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With San Francisco News Letter, January 5, 1901. 



Price, per copy. 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1858. 

N E V* ■ S-l ET)TBR 



Annual Subscription, $4.00 




Vol. LXII. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JANUARY 5. 1901. 



J f -si fir. Number1 - 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor FRED 
MARRIOTT. n Francisco. Entered at 

San Francisco Postofnee ns second-class matter. 

NEWS LETTER In London. Eng., la at 

■a Cornnlll E. C. England. (George Street & Co.. Represcnta- 

where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 

.tlons and advertising rates. Paris. France— Office, No. 

it Avenue de L'Opera. 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter. 
l 1 "^^ for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LcTTER, should be sent to tnis office not later than 6 p. m. 
Thursday. 



Uncle Sam does not borrow trouble; he pays for it. That 
perhaps, Is his reason for offering Denmark $3,000,000 for the 
Danish Antilles, which (pray heaven!) may prove a less 
expensive economy than our gift of Goi!, the Philippines. 



The recent encounter between the real estate brokers, 
Herman Shalnwald and B. If. Qunn, in which the first-named 
gentleman put the other to sleep in a short, snappy round, 
might be mentioned in our nnandal columns as "a clash in 
the market, followed by a sudden fall in realties. 



Superintendent Mills of West Point says that hazing can- 
not be stopped at West Point, and Superintendent Mills, as a 
soldier knows his business. If the military science is the art 
of killing, where better can the soldier learn his trade than 
at the school which teaches him the A B C of his craft? 



The Baptists and their fellow churchmen of the blue flame 
and never-dying worm held a grand transcontinental revival 
to usher in the new year. A certain minority of the body 
politic still remains unsaved — due. perhaps, to the general 
clamor of New Year fish horns which partially drowned out 
the national howl of righteousness. 



They have a free and easy way o£ handling social prob- 
lems in Australia. The New South Wales Government has 
become seriously alarmed over the decrease in the birth 
rate and has appointed a royal commission to investigate 
the cause and devise a remedy. The commission's report 
should make interesting reading. 



There is much grief among young and inexperienced col- 
lege instructors due to the late decree of the Board of Health 
to the effect that a professor must have had at least five 
years' experience in his institution before he is qualified to 
become a faculty member of the City and County Hospital. 
This rule, which it may he somewhat hard on the young 
medicos is an unqualified boon to those patients of the hos- 
pital, who do cut some figure, after all. 



And after the bang and crash of imperialism has died with 
numerous other ephemeral noises of the late campaign, it 
is to laugh when we read the accounts of McKinley's late 
dear enemies, now eloquent in their descriptions of the 
democratic simplicity with which the President bade a happy 
New Year to the glittering envoys of the Powers that Be. 



There is such a thing as a school teacher becoming too 
well educated, as Superintendent P. M. Fisher of Oakland is 
clever enough to understand. Teachers' institutes, he says 
(according to our interpretation of a recent speech), are too 
apt to force advanced ideas on teachers of lower grades, 
•who, if they be not level-headed, are prone to rehash them 
for the benefit of children who have not yet digested the 
mysteries of the multiplication table. Advocates of ad- 
vanced child study should be forced to try their experi- 
ments on their own children. 



After Belcher's reversal of the deer if Hebbard 

vi reed from the reversal of Troutt, it is pathetic to note thai 
the Washington Bnpreme Court is about to reverse itself 
ranking the Reno marriages legal by the reversed raver 
sal of a reversal empowered to reverse itself, if anybody 
can ).■!! from this tangle "f lav* whether Mrs. Joseph M. 
Wood is entitled to $400,000, he is well on the way toward :i 
satisfactory answer of the conundrum: "Why is a mouse 
when it spins?" 



Lucky Otto Kromatowsky of San Rafael has now eleven 
times attempted suicide by throwing himself in the track 
of a moving train, each time being rewarded by unsuccess. 
Not being as many tailors as are required to make a man. 
and not having as many lives as a cat, it would behoove Otto 
to be cautious. Thirteen is an unlucky number, and only 
one throw stands between him and the thirteen. However, 
there seems to be but one possible cure for this habit of 
his. 



That international baby contest which the London news- 
paper proprietor, Harmsworth, is arranging with the New 
York Journal will furnish an excellent opening for the in- 
genious photographer. A clever man behind a camera can 
do almost anything, and it would not he difficult to produce 
a composite photograph which would represent an ideal 
baby. To make the competition worth anything the winning 
infant should he produced in court to show that he or she 
really exists. 



That erratic journalist, W. T. Stead, has retired to The 
Hague, whence he can preach treason and exalt the enemy's 
cause in perfect safety. In the present temper of the Eng- 
lish people it would be dangerous for him to return to Lon- 
don, but in Holland he can laugh at the threatening letters 
he daily receives. There is only one way to reach such a 
man's feelings, and that is through his pocket. A boycott 
on the Review of Reviews would very soon bring Stead to 
his senses, and probably the British public will soon resort 
to this plan. 



"A real lady possesses all the qualities of a real gentle- 
man," says Max O'Rell, whose monumental ignorance of 
what is needed to make a fair example of either sex has 
been aired before the American public (Mark Twain and 
others) so long that his statements are going pretty well 
unchallenged for the reason that to dispute Mr. O'Rell is to 
waste the breath that God gave us to say something with. 
Just what the vague Frenchman's conception of a "real 
lady" is or a "real gentleman" may be, no one exactly 
knows — Max O'Rell least of all. 




Mrs. Carrie Nation, having indulged, perhaps to excess, in 
the milk and water so liberally labeled by her sisters of the 
W. C. T. U., ran amuck in several Kansas City saloons a few 
nights ago, and before she could be surrounded and dis- 
umbrellaed by the police had wrought several hundred dol- 
lars' worth of damage among the bottles and glassware 
which stand around the throne of Bacchus, after which the 
lady was borne on a wave of conscious rectitude and patrol 
wagon to the city prison, where she refused to be bailed out 
by her prayerful sisters of the W. C. T. U. Be not too hasty 
to condemn, ye slaves of rum and iniquity. On that same 
historic night in Kansas City a child was strangled, three 
women held up and one killed by a footpad, and a fourteen- 
year-old girl disfigured by acid at the hands of a vitriol 
thrower; so, you see, the W. C. T. U. is not, after all, the only 
lawless element in Kansas City. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 



HAZING AT WEST POINT. 

The evidence given in regard to the hazing of Cadets Booz 
and Breth at West Point, though very sparingly and reluct- 
antly given, makes it abundantly clear that the nation's 
great military training school is not what most people had 
been led to believe it was. If the brutal hazing practiced 
there cannot be stopped, and the officers say it cannot, it 
will be well to close the institution for a year and reorgan- 
ize it upon sounder and more democratic conditions. The 
crying evil at West Point that lies at the root of most of the 
other evils, is a snobbish assumption of aristocratic super- 
iority on the part of cadets from certain of the older sec- 
tions of the country. The youths from the South are particu- 
larly given to the practice of hazing, and they like above all 
things to have sons of Northern military heroes for victims. 
Thus a grandson of General Grant and a son of General Mc- 
Arthur have recently been put through a course of humilia- 
tion and brutality that might well appall the stoutest heart. 
We are told that this was done to "take the conceit out of 
them." But the judges of that conceit were self constituted, 
and the probabilities are that the conceit was all on their 
side. It must have been arrogance or self-sufficiency or 
conceit which gave them to feel that they were entitled to 
toiture, thrash, and humiliate their juniors beyond the 
point of human endurance. Yet who is there to take the con- 
ceit out of them? It might be well to hire a few professional 
bruisers to see if they could not put down hazing in the 
academy. No young man, De he military cadet or university 
student, is the worse for having a full share of pride and self- 
respect, and it belongs to no other man to try to beat it out 
of him by acts that degrade and humiliate. To administer 
"hell sauce," a decoction of nicotine and hot pepper, may be 
fun to brutes, but it may be death to sensitive natures like 
Cadet Booz. To break the jaw of Cadet Breth may have indi- 
cated that his senior was a fitting candidate for the prize- 
ring, but it ended poor Breth's chosen career. The nation 
supports West Point, not to turn out bullies, braggarts, and 
prize-fighters, but to supply the army with "officers and gen- 
tlemen." It is being said that if a man cannot stand the 
rough and tumble of West Point he is not fit to be a soldier. 
Let us see how that is. In a sketch just to hand of the early 
life and career of Lord Roberts, we find it stated that when 
he was passing through England's greatest military school, 
he was so physically weak as to be unable to take part in 
the athletic exercises of the institution. Yet his kindly na- 
ture and brilliant scholarship won for him the affectionate 
consideration of his companions. He graduated at the head 
of his class, and went out to the warmer climate of India, 
in which he was born. At over seventy years of age, he is 
still serving his country as her greatest soldier. He is as 
tough as oak, as hard as nails, and as supple as a four year 
old, yet he could not have stood a West Point hazing. 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. 

On the first day of the new century there was inaugurated 
in the sunny Southern hemisphere a new commonwealth 
that is bound to grow apace and expand into a great 
nation. Nothing can stop the progress of Australia or pre- 
vent her realizing the great destiny that manifestly lies 
before her. With her pride to excel, her vast resources, 
and her go-ahead Anglo-Saxon people, the new century into 
which she is born contains no fairer promise than her birth 
as a commonwealth. Independent in everything except 
name, she will yet make a name among the nations. If the 
mother country is to decline, as so many of our dailies are 
fond of predicting she will, it may well be that in her de- 
clining years she will draw all the aid and comfort she 
may stand in need of from her loyal offspring at the An- 
tipodes. The new commonwealth starts with a population 
more British than the British, and it is with something more 
than good will that they will henceforth bear part of the 
burden of empire. They might, if they so willed, have 
gained a separate independence, but they said "perish the 
thought! Sinking or swimming, living or dying, the British 
Empire is good enough for us." Well would it have been 
for the race if the United States could have ended their 
connection with the old country in a somewhat similar- 
spirit. But it is idle to speculate upon that now; it is. 
enough that Great Britain learned the lesson from us,, 
never again to rupture her connection with her colonies by" 



violence, and that she is now doing her best to heal the 
wounds left by our Revolutionary War. It will be well for 
the race, as well as for the peace and civilization of the 
world, if she succeeds. 

Meanwhile, the Commonwealth of Australia has been 
founded amidst the loud acclaim of the entire empire. Her 
white flag of peace, with the Southern Cross in the upper 
corner, has been given to the breeze, and has been saluted 
by Britons everywhere. The newly adopted constitution is 
neither wholly English or American, but a very considerate 
adaptation of both. There is a House of Representatives, 
based on population, as with us. There is also a Senate, 
chosen by popular vote in large constituencies. The error 
of giving each state, whether large or small, an equal num- 
ber of Senators has been avoided. The experiment will be 
watched with interest in this country, where we have a 
system that is an anomaly. Upon no just principle of rep- 
resentation can we defend the giving of Nevada, with only 
10,000 population, as much political power as New York, with 
seven and a half millions. We shall change that some day. 
Australia has adopted the British system of ministerial re- 
sponsibility that has been found to work so well. Sugges- 
tions have frequently been made in this country to give 
our Cabinet officers seats in Congress to enable them to 
explain the doings of their departments, but with responsi- 
bility only to the President. Some such plan will be 
adopted sooner or later. In Australia there is a well-settled 
determination to check the Senate from the start, and not 
permit it to become the chief power, as here. Though 
possessing as large an area as the United States, without 
Alaska, Australia will expand. She will find it necessary to 
her own protection to take in the neighboring islands, and 
she will not hesitate to do it. Her commercial expansion 
will follow much the same lines as our own. In South 
Africa and the Orient she will rival the old country, and 
from her own borders to the Philippines she will cope 
with us. 



THE PROGRESS OF THE IRON HORSE. 

While the State of New York still leads in point of popula- 
tion, it has taken seventh place in miles of railway, while 
Pennsylvania, which ranks second in population, has advan- 
ced to second place in mileage. Illinois is still the greatest 
railroad State, with almost 11,000 miles, as it has been for 
a score of years, although it is third in population, having 
1,480,000 less inhabitants than Pennsylvania, and 2,466 
less than New York State. Ohio ranks fourth in population, 
and fifth in mileage, and Missouri is fifth in population and 
ninth in mileage. These, of course, are old States compared 
with California and they naturally outrank us in the num- 
ber of population they have been able to attract, and the 
railway mileage they have been able to construct. Although 
only half a century old, California stands as the twenty- 
first State in the Union in point of population, and the 
fifteenth in the matter of railroad mileage. It has surpassed 
the older States of South Carolina, Louisiana, Maryland, 
New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, Dela- 
ware, Kansas, Arkansas, Nebraska, and Maine. It is ahead 
of Massachusetts, Kentucky, New Jersey, North Carolina, 
Alabama, and Mississippi in the matter of railroad mileage, 
but behind them in population. Illinois and many other 
of the older States are now so well supplied with steam rail- 
ways and with a rapidly increasing mileage of electric roads, 
that their increase of steam trackage will from this time on 
proceed at a slower rate, but the Pacific Coast and the 
Great West still afford room for many thousands of miles 
of new roads and for numerous and notable changes in the 
rnnk of States. The United States, not counting Alaska, 
or our new island possessions, now have 76,500,000 people 
and 191,000 miles of railroad. If even the rate of increase 
for the past ten years be maintained, the year 1910 will see 
in the same territory nearly 90,000,000 of people and more 
than 220,000 miles of steam railways, with electric railways 
or trackless automobiles, supplementing them on every 
street and highway. It is a prodigious growth that no other 
country — not even the great British Empire — has equaled. 
If China should wake up and give protection to invested 
capital, she might easily take second place as a railroad 
center. The gridironing of China with railways is to be one 
pj the achievements of the twentieth century. 



January 5, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



010 CUDAHY DO RIGHT 7 
Ruasell Sage says that Mr Cudahj offered a pre mium for 

•«'h.-n he paid the kldnapp. 

n fnr his safe retain. Mr Sage holds 

id no right to permit his parental affections 

of public duty He thinks that the 

Idren will now beoonM ns 

"f an Industry In the t'ni' u brigandage ll 

rts nf Italy. I'erhaps It may. bat If II fault 

will lie with our inadequate i nws nn d an Inefficient police. 

•hat in Nebraska there is no law against kidnap- 

ping, and that the only charge that will stick against the 

•f the boy Is one fur the extortion of the |i 

rhlch is a misdemeanor punishable with s 
'erm of imprisonment. All through the Weal the (eel ; 
now strong that laws must be at once passed making 
cplng a crime only less than murder. The criminal 
■•f California needs a now section added to it dealing 
with the subject matter, and no doubt the Legislature which 
on Monday next will attend to the question. It may 
If true that the ,-asy way in which Mr. Ciidahy parted with 
the large sum of $26, I will have the bad effect of conduc- 
ing t.i the commission of many more such crimes, but then, 
what fond parent would not have done as he did under like 
circumstances? "A sense of public duty' is a very estima- 
bl< thing in its way. but it pales Its Ineffectual Are be- 
ne yearning passion of a parent bereft of his offspring. 
Mr. I'udahy had before his eyes the example of the Charlie 
Ross case. Mr. Ross, who was a man of but moderate means, 
acting under the advise of the police refused to pay the ran- 
some money demanded, and as a consequence his child was 
drowned in North River. His abductors were never brought 
to trial, although they are known to have died in prison 
for subsequent crimes. Mr. Multi-Millionaire Sage is not 
just the kind of man to say what should be done with dollars 
when the life of a child hangs in the balance. With him, 
hi; counting house is his heaven, his ledger the only Bible 
he knows, and his money a god to be valued above the life 
of a child. Four or five years ago Mr. Sage was encountered 
In the passageway leading to his office by an anarchist, 
who demanded his money. A stranger passing at the mo- 
rn nt promptly interposed his body between the two men, 
and received a dangerous pistol shot wound. Mr. Sage es- 
caped scott free, but the stranger had to be carried to a hos- 
pital. When he recovered Mr. Sage refused to as much as 
pay his expenses or make him a present. Such a man will 
not be taken as a guide in the matter of paying money 
for anything. 



forward In this cause, a public subscription might hi 
■ ry funds. Bfary . hot! h 
churchgoer, area professing christian should 
would roll In by the bsrrelful 
iiinient which Would I 
of the world, surpassing even the statue of Liberty which 
guard „, . i,, \,.„ fork harbor. 



THE LONE MOUNTAIN CROSS. 

Here is a golden opportunity for one of our many multi- 
millionaires to celebrate the dawn of a new century and at 
the same time hand his name down to posterity graven on 
imperishable stone. The most prominent landmark in San 
Francisco, which has braved the wintry storms of nearly 
forty years, gave way at last before the recent great gale. 
Of course it must be replaced, and Archbishop Riordan has 
already intimated his intention of erecting another cross 
out of the church funds. But this is a matter which concerns 
every citizen of San Francisco, and it should be handled in 
a broader way. The maintenance of the symbol of Chris- 
tianity on the most prominent spot in the city is not an affair 
for the Roman Catholics only; it is the bounden duty of 
every Christian denomination. The cross on this lonely 
sandhill was the first sight which greeted the storm-tossed 
mariner gladly reaching the shelter of the Golden Gate; 
it was the last object which sped the parting voyager 
leaving home and friends behind him. It cast its gigantic 
shadow first over a racetrack where all the follies of life 
were given full play ; then over a vast encampment whence 
thousands of earnest, patriotic citizens went down to the 
Philippines to die. A symbol like this is not to be lightly 
treated. Let us put up the cross again, by all means, but 
let us see to it that the work is done in fitting style. There 
is in the Golden Gate Park a magnificent monument, the 
Prayer-book Cross. Why should we not remove this to the 
top of Lone Mountain, or, better still, erect something even 
larger and handsomer? It is merely a matter of a few 
thousand dollars. There are hundreds of men among us who 
could defray the cost out of their own pockets and never 
miss a cent. And if there is no one patriotic enough to 



ON CUTTING ONE'S HAIR. 
'There are three kinds of heads." said the author of 

' i.a.iy Windermere's Fair' , .e long-hatred, the simrt 

d an. I tin. bald; I am alia. ling In both the Inside and 
lie outside nf the heads." This was at a little late-and early 
■upper given In San Francisco some many years ago, when 
the play writer was al tin- summit of his eccentricity. "Had 
We never known the shears of the barber," he continued. 
"external baldness never would have been confined almost 
exclusively to the male." 

The late lamented Irishman of London never In all his life 
Uttered a truer remark. But nobody minded him In thoso 
<';;>s. and it has remained for a recent issue of the Frank- 
furter Wochenblatt to take up the question profoundly and 
expose the barber in all his unworth. "As grass that is often 
cut grows again and becomes thicker, so, it is believed, the 
hair should do when it is cut. This comparison, however, is 
a false one." And then in a clean, scientific way the editor 
explains that a developed hair is a perfectly formed mass 
of horn which has nothing further to do with the case in 
which the hair rests than to receive from it from below 
further growth and to be held firmly by it, while, on the 
other hand a blade of grass is a network of fine ducts In 
which is constantly circulating the nourishment which the 
blade draws from the root. Constant cutting, according 
to our scientist, disturbs the natural growth of the hair, as 
it incites the papilla, the real producer of the hair, to forced 
and unnatural production that in more or less time exhausts 
itself. That so few women are bald may be attributed to the 
fact that their hair is seldom cut; just the other way 'round 
with men, who spend a good part of their natural lives in 
the barber's chair. Baldness is becoming so common that, 
according to a worthy Glasgow physician, there will be 
little or no hair on the head of man when 1902 is ushered 
iti. So, gentlemen, it is up to you. Will you rob posterity 
of its natural' scalp covering, or will you continue to use 
the shears and beget a race of men whose foreheads start 
ac the nose and finish at the back of the neck? 



THE PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION AT BUFFALO. 

The City of Buffalo is to do herself proud on and after 
the first of May next. On that day her great Pan-American 
Exposition is to open amidst a blaze of glory that was not 
surpassed by even the World's Fair at Chicago. "All the world 
and the rest of mankind" are expected to be there, and most 
perfect are the arrangements being made to receive and 
gratify them. The work of preparation has been going on 
for months, and if we are to judge from the advertising 
sheets and illustrations that are being sent out, never be- 
fore have the grounds, buildings, and arrangements for ex- 
hibits for a great exposition been pushed so nearly to com- 
pletion a half year before opening day. The managers have 
undoubtedly taken hold of the enterprise with a skill and 
a vim that are bound to conquer success. Buffalo, first 
impressions to the contrary notwithstanding, is an ideal 
location for such an exhibition. Taking it as a center and 
drawing a circle of 500 miles radius, a population would be 
braced of over 40,000,000, or more than one-half the peo- 
ple of the United States, which, moreover, would include 
at least seventy-five per cent of the nation's industrial and 
commercial wealth. The same radius with Chicago as a cen- 
ter would not include one-half that amount of wealth or 
number of people. As a center of railroads and waterways, 
Buffalo is also at the front, with the tonnage of the Great 
Lakes pouring into its harbor, and twenty-six steel rail- 
ways reaching out in every direction 

Of course it goes without saying that the several 
States of our own Union will be well represented. Califor- 
nia will be there in all her glory. She will make a display 
of fresh and cured fruits such as the world has not so far 
seen. We hear that the railroad will send through fast 
trains during the fruit season with fresh supplies. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 



INDUSTRIAL SIGNIFICANCE OF SETTLING WITH 

CHINA. 

' The editor of the Engineering Magazine, in an article of 
much power, expresses the belief that the future of China 
was "practically settled" by the Anglo-German agreement, 
and he draws some significant inferences from this settle- 
ment. Nobody now, he thinks, wants to dismember the 
Chinese Empire. The bitter schooling which England has 
had in South Africa and the sorry blunders of the United 
States in the Philippines have taught the great powers the 
difficulties of world politics, and t _e fact that they are 
made greater, and not less, by the assumption of the stu- 
pendous burden of the actual government of huge sections 
of semi-civilized lands. The course to which the powers 
will have to come is the inspiring, advising, and to a large 
degree the organizing, of a new and wisely progressive gov- 
ernment, which, to the greatest extent possible, should be 
permitted and led to work out its own salvation. This, and 
not the colossal attempt to raise the mass by outside agency, 
should be the end to which the best efforts of Europe 
and America should be directed. England's burden in India 
is an object lesson that should deter other powers from en- 
tering into like obligations. The fearful cost of territorial 
acquisition in Africa and the Philippines has taught physi- 
cally the lessons which The Hague Conference put morally 
and intellectually. The world has gained from the sufferers 
by the Boer war and the Spanish wars, the knowledge it 
rejected when formulated in the abstract by the Peace Com- 
missioners. War and conquest, it is now plain, do not pay. 
The appreciation of that fact is vivid to-day, so that out of 
the turmoils at the close of the nineteenth century has come 
the promise for the unbroken peace and tranquility of the 
twentieth. Russia, long regarded as the menace of Europe, 
shows under the young Czar, unmistakable aspirations for 
peace and industrial development. The German Emperor, 
joining hands with English policy, has changed his role of 
War Lord for that of the promoter of enterprise and the 
foster father of commerce. What the preachers of peace 
could not impress upon the nations, the precipitators of war 
have written in blood and fire, and the lesson is learned. 
The most obvious sign of the change is the subsidence of 
the clamor for the partition of China, and the better work- 
ing together of the powers for the entity of the Empire, 
restoration of peace, the establishment of secure internal 
government, and the opening of common opportunity for 
the development of the country and the extension of its com- 
merce. 



SOME HOSPITAL REFORMS. 

The revival of the rumor that the Board of Health con- 
templates the removal of Dr. Sussdorff from the position 
of Superintendent of the City and County Hospital, is, if 
true, an intimation of purpose which the friends of the 
Board, as well as those who wish to see the management and 
general condition of the hospital improved, must regret. 
It is but a renewal of that species of personal politics which 
has for the past quarter of a century made the hospital a 
veritable shuttle-cock. That the condition of the City and 
County Hospital is susceptible of much improvement is 
all too true: but its faults are not of Dr. Sussdorff 's crea- 
tion, and his removal would not improve them. Upon the 
contrary, it would have a tendency to render "confusion 
worse confounded." If the Board of Health desires to im- 
prove the efficiency of the hospital as a place for the care 
of the sick there are two points to which it should promptly 
and earnestly devote its attention. The first and perhaps 
the most important of these is in the restraint of the doc- 
tors and students from the medical schools who are now 
using the institution as a clinic in connection with the edu- 
cational work of the college. There can be no valid objec- 
tion to allowing the hospital to be used by the college fac- 
ulties as an auxiliary in their work of imparting practical 
scientific instruction to those who are preparing themselves 
to care for the future health of their fellowmen: but there 
is a wide difference between allowing a hospital to be 
used in a rational manner for a clinical purpose and that 
other and irrational use which, practically, turns the institu- 
tion aside from the purpose of its existence and maintenance 
and by entirely subordinating its function as a hospital for 



the care and cure of the sick to its function as a clinic for 
the accommodation of medical schools — transforms it into 
a place of torture and worriment for the ailing and infirm. 
Patients in the City and County Hospital are human beings 
and the callow students from the medical schools should not 
be allowed to use their aching bodies as lay figures in their 
primative groping efforts after knowledge. Under the pres- 
ent arrangement the students from the medical schools ex- 
ercise, if they do not possess, the right to order patients at 
the City and County Hospital to lay down and strip for their 
examination at any time. The student examinations, it is 
hardly necessary to say, are not made with a view to aiding 
the sick man, but are solely for the purpose of enabling the 
student to "study the case." Patients are sometimes sub- 
jected to these examinations three and four times a day. 

Another point to which the Hoard of Health could profit- 
ably turn its attention is in regard to the dieting of the pa- 
tients. This has always been a weak spot in the manage- 
ment of the City and County Hospital. In the past rascally 
contractors and officials used to steal about one-half of what 
was appropriated for the maintenance of the patients. 
That condition of things has been vastly improved since 
the present Board came into office. Its purchasing agent 
is generally able to report a saving of seven or eight thou- 
sand dollars per month over similar months under other 
administrations. But the patients are not any better fed. 
Those who are convalescent are left hungry and those who 
are so ill as to be without appetite are left without proper 
nourishment. It is a notorious fact that the criminals in 
the County Jail and the inmates of the Alms House are far 
better fed than the patients in the City and County Hospi- 
tal. This is a condition of things for which the Board of 
Health is itself responsible. 



HOMES FOR WORKINGMEN. 

In the Century for December, Mr. William Howe Tolnan 
gives a very interesting account of efforts being made to 
"humanize labor" in England. Large employers are finding 
it to be to their advantage to build model villages within 
easy reach of their factories, to the end that their work- 
men may be cheaply and comfortably housed. Detatched cot- 
tages are built which are furnished with whatever contrib- 
utes to the comfort and integrity of the home. Schools, 
small allotments for raising vegetables and flowers, a hall 
for religious services, a club building for the men, an insti- 
tute for the girls and women, an assembly hall, and grounds 
for recreation and sport. The industrial village on the out- 
skirts of Birkenhead," just the other side of the river from 
Liverpool, is given as an example. This village represents 
an expenditure of $1,250,000. The ground had to be cleared, 
streets laid out, trees planted, and such a general scheme 
adopted as would allow for the easiest and most ample ex- 
tension. In 1894 eighty-six cottages were built, which had 
increased to over 500 by the beginning of 1900. The archi- 
tecture of each group is different, thus avoiding a tiresome 
uniformity. Architects make frequent trips to this village 
ti see the effect of the cottages, and to vie with each other 
in improving their designs. The cottages for the rank and 
file of the men rent from seventy-five cents to one dollar 
«. week. These cottages include three bedrooms, a living 
room, kitchen and scullery, the water closets being in the 
yard. Clerks and foremen have larger houses for which they 
pay from a dollar to a dollar and a half a week. The rentals 
for the houses of the manager and heads of departments 
are from one and a half to two dollars a week. These ren- 
tals include water rates, municipal taxes, and cost of repairs; 
a week's notice on each side terminates a tenancy. An 
e;ght hour day makes possible enjoyment and satisfaction 
for the wage earners. The rentals in this village are less 
than half what they are in Birkenhead. The reduction is 
made in accordance with what the owner calls "prosperity 
sparing," that is, bringing the industrial advantages of profit 
to the entire family, so that mother, sister, and daughter 
nay participate week by week in the benefits. Many more 
details are given by the writer, but we have quoted enough 
to indicate the nature of the enterprise. Why could not 
this municipality establish such a village for the benefit 
of the large army of employees it must always keep up? 
Then the street car lines, the large foundries, and the rail- 
reads might well follow suit. Progress is the watchword of 
the day. 



January 5. 1901. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

With the Rowdy Dowds 

on New Year's E\ i 



BY REGINALD SOMUTLeR. 

Another new year. ■ ry lo blant 

you In the .*.ir and imlte >■•■] In ■ 
Uke the man witn the horn: My auditor] 
n shock from the walk I foolishly took on K U irk.t 

It was til-- noisiest, rr. 
bawdiest crowd I ever saw In San Fran - many 

Tainted and chemical! | dint 

»H w " made out to loon alike to the drunken horn- 

blower, burnt-cork smearer and switch swinger. Rough men, 
putrid of drink, flew in the fa..- of law sod decency and 
; gross Hade* It was to be besmiitted with the cork, 
tickled with the switch and deafened with the horn at every 
few steps. A man can stand this sort of thing, but a woman 
cannot. There was one sight that gave joy to my jaded 
being. A rather diffident-appearing youth with lemon hair, 
top hat and an Inverness was assisting two young women to 
l.otta's fountain, where the cars stop. Just as they had 
made their way inside the stone posts that surround the 
fountain a flashy tough blew a noisy blare in the ear of one 
of the young women and rubbed smutty cork on the cheek 
ol the other. The lemon-headed youth did not move at the 
instant, but he said: Girls, is that the Haight-strect car 
coming up Market." Tin y turned to see, and as they turned 
he reached out a lean, powerful right to the chin of the 
offender, who dropped as though struck by lightning. 

"Why. certainly, that's the Haight. What's the matter 
with your eyes, Freddie?" 

And with the same delicate attention to business that had 
marked uis treatment of the rough. Freddie conducted his 
charges aboard the car, never once looking back at the now 
hornless, corkless and nerveless devil who was slowly pick- 
ing himself out of the street. 

We need more ,reddies on such nights. 

The only rebuke that is felt by these holiday hoodlums 
is one of the physical kind. Their tenderest spot is where 
they may be kicked with the least difficulty. Take a horn- 
blowing, smut-rubbing ruffian and turn his eyes due south 
and then let him be jolted by a well-filled boot from due 
north, and for a few minutes at least he will be reformed. 

Just why holiday should spell drunK I cannot fathom. 
Good fun, hearty and free, is always desirable, but it seems 
to me a poor token of new-century civilization that the first 
of its years should be welcomed with wet, obscene, absurd 
orgies. In my experience there is no city in the world that 
spends New Year's day and Independence day in i-ie violent, 
brutal fasnion that now obtains in San Francisco. Out of a 
mere festival the lower element of the town makes a dis- 
gusting, noisome, foul-breathed carnival of license and licen- 
tiousness, and, as I said before, no decent woman is safe on 
tue street. There may be a Freddy at hand to avenge the 
insult, but a half-ciozen Freddies could not prevent it. 

I went back to the nearest cluo at 1 o'clock in the morning 
of the first. A crowd of fellows were seated around the 
fireplace — bachelors, most of them, like myself — and I assure 
you, reader, it is on the bachelor these festal days and nights 
fall hardest. 

"Have a drink, Schuyler?" said the Colonel; "there's still 
a glass left in the last bottle." 

"Colonel," I said, "I don t think I'll ever take another drink 
as long as I live." 

"Great God, man! Not a New Year's resolution?" 

"Well, call it what you like," said I, "but I've just been 
up and down the street, and the very pavements are drunk 
and disorderly. I don't think I'll ever take another drink. 
No, sir — that is, except in a club, where a man has to behave 
himself whether he wants to or not." 

Policemen, Supervisors, Commissioners, did you ever 
tnink what a lovely place the city would be to live in if you 
could run it as simply and effectively as we run our clubs? 



- Swain's Bakery, on Sutter street, was flourishing when 

San Francisco was still in its infancy, and then, as now, it 
enjoyed an exclusive patronage. The best service and cook- 
ing in the city may be had there, and the surroundings will 
satisfy the most fastidious. Orders are taken for pies, 
pastries, bread, chicken sandwiches, etc. 



_ On the California Limited 

75 nOlirS loving San Francisco 

at 9 every morning 



to 



Chicago 



No i liatiKC of Cats and 
the most perfect set vice. 
Leaves every morning at 9 
o'clock. 



on 



Santa Fe 



Special Sale of 

Fine French Mixed 
and Assorted Chocolates 
30 cents a pound at 

WICHMAN'S, 754 Market Street. 



Bethesda 



to swim in." 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 

— Dr. SiikaI'Y, 274 Lexington avenue, New York 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 



Rend for 1'nmpltle 



418 Sacramento Si reel. 



WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 



Scotch_Whisky 

Importers • MACONDRAY &. CO. 

Double Eagle Whiskey 

ROYAL EAOLE DISTILLERIES CO. 

501-503-505 Market St. 112 Taylor SI.. San Trancisco. 

Deafness Overcome: 

Scunce has triumphed at last 

Latest and greatest invention up 
to times. " Invisible Ear-phone." 
Conveys sound directly to nerve of 
hearing. Appliance inserted in ear. 
Vibrating coil acts like telephone. 
Reasonabe. Head noises,- ear dis- 
charges cured quickly. Wiite for treatise and testi- 
monials free. 

INVISIBLE EAR PHONE CO , 

1230 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 




Vkasure'j 
Wand 



C&oley 



'ty no wand but P/easure's. 1^ 

Tom Jloort. 



A freak but a genius is Eduard Strauss. In leading the 
band he not only plays his own fiddle half the time, but 
dances whenever the measure will permit. This is the first 
time I have ever seen an orchestra conducted by foot power; 
but Strauss does it well in a lively, brisk fashion that we, 
unaccustomed to the court modes of Vienna might be in- 
clined to call vaudeville. Far be it from me to transfer 
the eccentricities of the Old World. If Eduard Strauss 
wants to dance and fiddle let him do it; his father did it 
before him, and the whole family has been prolific in turning 
out music of the Strauss type and dancing to its rhythmic 
measures. 

Having a ball-room orchestra, meagre in the wood wind, 
but splendidly equipped in the string choir, not to mention 
a fairly good brass department, Mr. Strauss is wise to stick 
mainly to a ball-room programme. The dance is his forte, 
and in spite of many ultra-European eccentricities that may 
appear as weird to the belated Westerner, he delivers this 
kind of music in fascinating style. It is all that any one of 
terpsichorean turn can do not to strike a step or two up 
and down the aisle when he plays, say, the "Blue Danube." 
Until you hear a Strauss direct this remarkable waltzy com- 
position you have not heard it at all. Eduard gives it with 
a lilt and a zip and a go that are irresistible. Of course he 
is to be seen as well as heard, but even a blind man could 
find joy in the sheer zip and speed of the Strauss waltz as 
Eduard plays it. 

The signal characteristics of Mr. Strauss' leadership are 
rhythm and delicate but sure enunciation. He varies the 
tempi as the mood influences, but I notice with pleasure 
that he never indulges in obscene rubato or in fierce, fiery 
finishes. There is nothing banal about Strauss. He is an 
original freak and an entertaining one. The orchestra is 
marked by the usual Viennese make up, which make the 
clarionet tribe nothing at all, the violin everything, and the 
brass a background, and re-enforcement in noisy passages. 
The combination is new to us, but the effect, which is that 
of predominant melody from the violins, is keenly realized. 

A great mistake was to charge 52. At normal prices there 
would have been less furniture and more people visible in 
the California. 

• * * 

Except for the most of its songs and specialties, which 
years and months ago anticipated this week's production at 
the Columbia, "The Belle of New York" is new to us, al- 
though old to less worthy people. The Salvation Army las- 
sie, the Prussian dialectrician, the tough girl and her 
"fren'," the pugilist, we have in vaudeville and in other 
musical and farcical comedies. But the general snap, glitter, 
spirit and whiz of the piece entire is a novelty to belated 
San Francisco, and even at the hands of a second-rate com- 
pany we may proudly say that this is the only real New 
York "review" in our experience. 

In spite of its forced tenderloinism, in spite of its utter 
disregard of plot and purpose, "The Belle of New York" 
wins through simple devilment and picturesqueness. It's 
a long late show, but you do not feel the hour until the last 
curtain is down and you are well outside in the cold. 

The S. A. belle is played with arch demureness by Beulah 
Dodge, a pretty girl with a mock Madonna face and a gen- 
tle, musical voice. The daredevil hero of the tender'oin fares 
less fortunately at the hands of George Tallman, who scorns 
to act and cannot sing. But this cocktail hero's father, 
as characterized by Edward J. Connelly, is a gem of unctious 
comicality. The madman dialectrician is howlingly good 
a= Joseph Kane presents him. But the tough pug and the 
Pell-street girl by Arthur Deagan and Flo Perry, and the 
insinuating French girl by Mae Sailor, are the best of all 
the bunch. A sprightly and sometimes naughty show it 
is, but never really vulgar. 

* * * 

Playwrights have taken a sudden and belated interest in 
Nell Gwynne, the little orange girl who won a certain place 



in the heart of King Charles II., and subsequently a certain 
place in his court. This furore is due to such a passion for 
emulation as prompted the Rubiaya of Le Gallionne and 
others still smaller to the tune of a thousand and one ver- 
sions for the press. There are half a thousand more or less 
crude attempts on the life of Nell Gwynne, I am told, and 
one has reached the Coast, as interpreted this week at the 
Grand Opera House. This particular one of the five hundred 
is said to be among the best, and is from the pen of Marie 
Doran. Scene and situation cannot help being of a certain 
amount of interest, considering the time of action and the 
wide difference in station among the persons represented. 
And so it is that Miss Doran's version generally interests by 
its color, even when true merit by dramatization and dia- 
logue are lacking. The piece as first produced had the ef- 
fect of being chiseled with an axe, and thrown together with 
a shovel, so loosely did the plot hinge and so poorly did the 
dialogue stand the oral test. It does not take an expert to 
see that "Nell Gwynne" is young, crude, and careless, but 
executed with a touch that tells occasionally. The material, 
as I have said, is good. Nell Gwynne, from the lowest sta- 
tion in society, acts the part of a good angel to the King, 
who proves grateful. Annie Sutherland as "Nell" was con- 
siderable of a revelation for versatility, and Kilgour's 
"King Charles" was full of humor and temperament. The 
piece draws good houses. 

* * * 

"Naughty Anthony" did an almost unprecedented thing 
by throwing up the dramatic sponge and quitting the 
boards in the middle of the week, the act standing as a 
tribute to the cleanly mind of the San Francisco public and 
to the good sense of the Alcazar management. And the 
latter showed good judgment, too, in replacing the New 
York atrocity by as clean a piece of romantic drama as 
"Nell Gwynne." 

If any of the half-thousand versions of this little play 
have merit I do not know, mt the samples I have seen, as 
plays, lack in many things, and the Alcazar production, from 
the pen of Charlotte Thompson, is no great exception. This 
is no fault of the management and the excellent company, 
for the play, as produced, is pictorial in the extreme, and 
Florence Roberts is the same expressive, magnetic heroine 
p.s of old. The scenic effects of the little play are above 
reproach, and it is worth mentioning here that to produce 
effective pictures in the cramped stage space allowed at the 
Alcazar is no small feat. The scenery of the last act is 
especially praiseworthy. But it was rather Florence Roberts 
that the crowd went to see and to applaud Thursday night, 
and but qualified praise can be given to the play itself, 
which, though occasionally quite clever, drags considerably 
and does not get anywhere in particular at the end. Lucius 
Henderson was Jack Churchill and Howard Scott was 
Charles II. Miss Roberts answered to repeated and enthus- 
iastic curtain calls. 

The popularity of "Nell Gwynne" will warrant another 
week's run, when "Sweet Lavender" will be put on the 
boards. 

* * * 

Packed houses nightly attest the success of the Tivoli's 
musical extravaganza, " Cinderella," which improves nightly 
and never fails to amuse the youngsters. The standing- 
room sign is in evidence nightly. The second edition will 
be put on Monday night, filled with new features and up-to- 
date material. Maud Williams sings a song called "The One 
I Love." Annie Myers will be heard in a sparkling difty, 
"Doing his Dooty-ooty," and Hartman brings out a funny 
topical song, besides any number of fresh jokes and witti- 
cisms. The other humorous numbers have been strength- 
ened by a supply of clever verses, and some new ballet fig- 
ures will also be added. After the run of "Cinderella" the 
comic opera by DeKoven & Smith, entitled "The Fencing 
Master," will be produced on a magnificent scale. 

"Way Down East," to open at the Columbia on Monday 
night, a rustic play of the "Old Homestead" type, will be 
produced by William A. Brady's special company, which 
played in New York and Chicago. The play was written by 
Lottie Blair Parker and elaborated by Joseph R. Grismer. 
Scenery and situation are said to be realistic pictures of New 
England life and character. 

• • 

Eight new turns will make up the Orpheum bill for the 
week commencing Sunday. The Olracs, five in number, 



January 5, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



irl<-*n.uo acrobats, and said to b) iWlina 

GirarrI Is an etromlr opera nUr; J K. frosbj- ntvl Inr-i K.ir 
man will pr- -.nt a sketch written for th<m !>)- J 

••ell. a well-known now»pai»rmiin. the Willy Collnls 
rlc dancers, and Joe Stanley Is a boy soprano. 

Hawthorne Sisters remain another week, and Shean 
A Warren, who www hire a short time ago. return for one 
week. The blograph pictures will bo new. 

• • • 

For the weak beginning to-morrow afternoon. "Human 
Hearts" comes to the California Theater. 'Take your sister 
to see this play: It will not cause a blush," says the press- 
hlldren— they will be amused by its abund- 
• >f humor: take the old folks — they will enjoy the re- 
vival of old associations." \ Brett? Time" will follow. 
.Mrs. Flake comes to the California the latter part of the 
month. 

• • • 

The advance sale of seats for the two afternoon concerts 
to be given at the Columbia Theatre by Mdlle. Dolores 
(Antoinette Trebell!) will begin at the box-office of the thea- 
tre on Thursday morning. Reserved seats are to be 11.00 
and $1.50. The first concert takes place on the afternoon of 
Tuesday, January loth, and on the following Thursday the 
second matinee will be given. 

• * * 

On Monday morning the advance sale of season seats 
for the Henschel recitals will open at Sherman, Clay & 
Co.'s 9tore, and the indications are that there will be a big 
line of the admirers of the superb artists, who 'will be 
anxious to secure choice locations in Metropolitan Temple, 
where the recitals are to take place. The recitals have 
bt.en arranged for the month of February, commencing 
with the 5th and ending with the 14th. The Henschels are 
now making their farewell tour of America and are sure of 
a big reception in this city, where they are popular fa- 
vorites. 



The art of a modern journal includes the advertisements 
as well as any other department. 

On the inside cover of the Christmas News Letter there 
was an illustration of two well-dressed young men seated 
at a table enjoying a glass of J. F. Cutter Whisky. It ap- 
peared to be a sketch from life, and the clever manner in 
which the artist handled his pencil was no doubt assisted 
by the inspiration of this famous and delightful beverage. 
We very much doubt if there is a brand of whisky in the 
market that is purer and safer to drink than the J. F. Cutter 
brand. It should be kept in the house by every family, 
for, besides being a delightful whisky to offer to a guest, 
it is for medicinal purposes the safest to take. It is well- 
known that the constantly changing climate of California 
makes whisky the safest all-round drink, and a pure article 
besides being safe prolongs life. There are crime and 
sickness in bad whisky, but in a good brand such as the J. F. 
Cutter there are health, vitality and the best of good cheer. 
As a well-known clubman said the other day: "I have 
sworn off for the new year against a single drop — that is, 
unless it be J. F. Cutter." 



New Goods Arrived. 
An elegant new stock of fine art, bronzes, marbles, vaces, 
bric-a-brac, and French furniture, from the different art cen- 
ters of Europe, selected at the Paris Exposition, can now be 
seen at S. & G. Gump Co.'s Art Store, 113 Geary street. A 
number of new paintings and water colors by some of the 
foremost European artists selected this year have also ar- 
rived, and are now on exhibition. 



The Post-street Hammam Baths have been entirely 

renovated, and both ladies and gentlemen may be assured of 
the best Turkish, Russian, Electrical and Medicated Baths 
at any hour of the day or night. Perfect cleanliness, skilled 
attendants, and elegant appointments conspire to make this 
the most popular baths in San Francisco. 



PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A sovereign remedy. One dose will cure a cough. It never 
fails. Try it. Price, 25 cents. George Dahlbender & Co., 
214 Kearny street. For sale by all druggists. 

Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 




How weak 



i|> and waiter seems when 
you begin your washing ! 
don't get any strength OUl 

of it till tin- work is about 
done. Plenty of hard work and 
rubbing and wear and tear, even 
then but more of it at the begin- 
ning; whin tin- \\at<r is weakest 
Now with Pearline, the water is 
just as strong at the beginning as at 
This is one of the reasons (only one) 
why Pearline acts so much better than soap, in 
all washing and cleaning. Use no soap with it. «s 

M///o/?s^/>e#r///re 



Columbia Theatre. 



Uottlob, Marx & Co.. 

LesseeB and Managers. 



Beginning next Monday. Jan. 7th, 
Brady presents the paateral idyl 



first time hero. Mr. Win. A, 



'"WAY DOWN EAST" 

(the sweetest story ever told) 
By Lottie Blair Parker. Elaborated by Jos. R. Grismer. 
Coming— Mdlle Dolores ( Antoinette Trebelli ) in afternoon 



G-i I !-£■*»-«! - Tk«^i,P« THE POPULAR HOUSE. 
3 1 1 TO r n I a I Ilea Xre ■ Reservations by 'Phone. Main 1713 
Beginning Sunday afternoon. January 6th, one week only 

HUMAN HEARTS 

The idyl of the Arkansaw Hills. Laughted, pathos, tears. 

Special and elaborate scenery. 

Usual popular prices. 

Next — "A Breezy Time." 

Coming — Mrs. Minnie Maddern Fiske, 



Alcazar Theatre. 



Bblasco & Thall. Managers. 

Phone Main 254. 



Week of January 7lh. Continued brilliant success of the 
FLORENCE ROBERTS' season in a special engagement of the 
sensation of two continents 

NELL GWYNNE 

Matinee during this engagement Saturdays only. 

In preparation: A beautiful presentation of "Sweet Lavender." 

Seats reserved six days in advance. 

Reserved prices: 15c., 25c, 35c„ 60c. 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. 



Mna. Ernestine Keeling, 

Proprietor and Manager. 

Second edition— fourth week begins Monday evening, January 
7th„ the greatest holiday attraction in years, 

CINDERELLA 

by Ferris Hartman. A season of delight for everyone. A new 
invoice of clever songs, pretty dances, striking costumes and 
up-to-date humor. 
Every Evenings at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp. 

Popular prices— 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



Orph 



eum, 



San Franolsco's Greatest Music Hall. 

O'Farrell St,, between Stockton and Powell streets. 



THE OLRAGS, 



Bettina Girard, J. F. Crosby and Inez Forman, The Willy Colinis, 
JoeSantley, Hawthorne Sisters, William Cahill Davis, Biograph. 
Return for one week of Shean and Warren. 
Reserved Seats 25c.; balcony 10c.; opera chairs and box seats, 50° 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 



Metropolitan Temple 

MR. and MRS. EENSOHIL in six 

GRAND RECITALS 

February 5th, 7th, 9th, Uth, 13th, 14th. Sale of Sfason Tickets 
beeins next Monday moraine at Sherman. Clay & Co. s Store 
Kearny and Sutter streets. Season Tickets transferable. 
Prices— 99, 87, and 86. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 




Library&ahk 



wsm-iMm* 




■-- ie—l- 



That there is no royal road to success 

How to Succeed, is a well-recognized fact, but in "How 
to Succeed," Mr. Austin Bierbower, au- 
thor o£ "The Virtues and Their Reasons," "The Morals of 
Christ," etc., tells his readers that the first problem of suc- 
cess is knowing what they want, as well as how to get it — 
in brief, what to attempt. The book is full of "wise saws" 
and excellent advice. Perhaps we cannot do better than 
quote a few of the author's pertinent aphorisms, taken at 
random here and there: 

"To be much of a man one must be a whole man." 

"The secret of great happiness is to enjoy work, and 
especially hard work." 

"Habitually man is a fool, and only when he tries does he 
rise above mediocrity." 

"Many work so hard at what they don't want that they 
have no strength to get what tney do want." 

"Greatness must be achieved, and to achieve it we must 
do a great work; and to do a great work we must have a 
great task; and a great task is a series of difficulties." 

"To achieve a great success one must be healthy, sober 
and aroused. Sickness, drunkenness and laziness are the 
three chief impediments to success. No man has brains 
enough for botn work and dissipation." 

"Success should be honest. For this every man must give 
to the world as much as he gets from it. Man naturally 
rises by uoing the useful, all other means failing because 
irrelevant. Few care to honor those who who do not benefit 
them. The great must be serviceable, and the greatest 
most so. One's importance is measured by his beneficences. 
He who can do men no good is not in demand." 

"One should learn that he cannot get anything for nothing. 
While doing so he lets the opportunity pass of getting it for 
something. Success must be earned, and he who is qualified 
for it prefers to pay the price (the easiest way of getting 
anything.) To beg one's way througn life is to travel a hard 
road which leads nowhere. Those who get on must do and 
not merely receive. Alms do not enrich men." 

R. F. Fenno & Co.. Publishers, New York. Price, $1.00. 

The Sword of the King. Somewhat remarkable as being 
his maiden effort as a writer of 
romance is Ronald MacDonald's stirring English story, "The 
Sword of the King." Undoubtedly one of the main reasons 
for Mr. MacDonald's literary proficiency lies in the fact that 
he is his father's son, the son of Rev. Dr. George MacDonald, 
veteran preacher, poet and novelist. The closing years of 
the seventeenth century and the struggle of William of 
Orange for the British throne are the time and. events 
chosen by the author around which to weave a dashing tale 
of adventure and hairbreadth escape. A broken biade which 
hf.ngs in the house of the heroine is a subject of curiosity to 
her children, and to them she relates t~e story of its pre- 
sentation to her by the Prince of Orange, whose life she had 
saved when, disguised as a trooper, she had rushed to his 
side to warn him of a plot to assassinate him. It is a highly 
dramatic tale, and is said to have been a play before it 
became a novel. Mr. MacDonald is himself an actor as well 
as a playwright, and "The Sword of the King" will certainly 
establish his reputation as a novelist of no mean ability. 

The Century Company. Publishers, New York. Price 
$1.50. 

The Frigate Constitution. Mr. Ira N. Hollis, with the laud- 
able purpose of keeping alive an 
interest in our oid war vessels and in -_e sailors who con- 
tributed so materially to me welfare of our country, has 
gathered together in an interesting volume, entitled "The 
Frigate Constitution," the many events which go to make up 
the long and eventful career ot the old ship that must ever 
be dear to the American people. In the old navies sailing 
frigates occupied much the same place as the cruisers of the 
present day. The power of the steam engine has in- 



augurated changes which have relegated the armed sailing 
vessel to a past already growing hazy to the young men of 
the Navy. The author ably sets forth the whole story of the 
maritime war of 1812 and tne Constitution's claim to great- 
ness, and in conclusion voices tne hope that the country will 
"preserve the old ships as the home of departed glory." 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., Publishers. Price, $1.50. 

Between Boer and Briton. The adventures of two boys, one 
American, the other English, 
before and during the first eight months of the war between 
Great Britain and the South African republics, is told by 
Mr. Edward btratemeyer in "Between Boer and Briton," 
cannot fail to interest the young readers for whom the 
story is written. The tale, however, is not all of war, for 
it contains many pictures of life as it is to-day on the ostrich 
and cattle farms and at the immense mines at Johannesberg. 
For a deal of information in decidedly attractive form many 
a boy will be indebted to the author of the ever-popular 
"Old Glory Series." Lee & Shepard, Publishers, Boston. 
Price, $1.25. 

The Fortune of a Day. Mrs. Grace Ellery Channing-Stetson 
in "The Fortune of a Day," a little 
book, the initial story of which gives the title to a collection 
of a half-dozen or more delightful sketches of Italian life, 
writes with charming simplicity of the men and women — ■ 
Paola, Beppino, Rosina and Tomasso — who, under the blue 
siies of Italy, where the nightingales sing in the ilexes, live 
and love and suffer, as they do elsewhere in this work-a-day 
world. Stmpatica the author must be to have so thoroughly 
imbued herself with the temperament of the characters 
she so faithfully portrays. Herbert S. Stone & Co.. Pub- 
lishers, Chicago. Price, $1.25. 

A. S. tsarnes & Co.. Publishers, New York. Price, $1.00. 
In the Hands of the Cave Dwei.ers. George A. Henty, the 

prolific writer of stor- 
ies for boys, has in his latest volume, "In the Hands of the 
Cave Dwellers." written a tale of exciting adventures and 
hairbreadth escapes which should prove quite as popular 
as its predecessors. It deals with the adventures of two 
young men, an American and a Mexican. The sister of the 
latter is captured by a tribe of Indians living in caves, and 
of the efforts made to rescue ner and her final safe return 
home the author writes with sensationalism worthy the oc- 
casion. 

Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New Y'ork. Price, $1.00. 

Vesty of the Basms. Mrs. Sarah P. McLean Green's fine 
Cape Cod story, "Vesty of the 
Basms," is out in holiday attire, illustrated with drawings 
by Otto H. Bacher and from photographs by Clifton John- 
son, all of which bring out admirably the quaint life along 
the Massachusetts shore. This book and her "Cape Cod 
Folks" have established for the author the reputation of be- 
ing one of the best exponents of down East Yankee cha ac- 
ter, while for mingled pathos and humor she has few super- 
iois. Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New York. Price, 
$2.00. 

Charming Renee. A very improbable story of a most beau- 
tiful middle-class English girl who mar- 
pies ;i misanthropic nobleman is "Charming Renee," by Ara- 
bella Kenealy. An attractive cover of gray and silver is its 
only recommendation. Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New 
Y'ork. Price, $1.50. 

The Mills of the Gods. Notwithstanding its attractive title, 
"The Mills of the Gods," by Louise 
Snow Dorr, is neither entertaining nor meritorious. It be- 
longs to what one might call the query category of books. 
One asks one's self why they are written, and wonders who 
will read them. M. E. B. 



— After twenty-four years under the Palace Hotel. Marsh's Jap- 
anese Fine Art Store has moved to 214 Post street. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 

Robertson's 126 ^ street 



January 5, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



*CH7i Crierth 



'Htv tit fricr>'.i/\tt l»e dtTil fi 
H •O—Ott mHflt/ tltt dml. jir. wtt j 




The wild galoot has ceased to toot, 

The revelry Is done. 
Til ntury Is h"re fur k> 

Anil I am glad for one. 
I tnke the cotton from my ears 

And I am glad for one. 

The idiot who goeth not 

Beyond the ken of boys. 
Whose greatest joy is just to make 

A heaven-splitting noise. 
He will be dead before thej make 

Another such a noise. 

And so when all that demon brawl 

Is passed away and done, 
The city takes a sober mien. 

And I am glad for one. 
If she keeps still a hundred years 
I'll still be glad for one. 

"I bring you the stately matron named Christendom, re- 
turning bedraggled, besmirched and dishonored from 
raids in Kias-Chow, and the Philippines, with her 
soul full of meanness, her pockets full of boodle and 
her mouth full of pious hypocrisies. Give her soap 
and towel, but hide the looking glass. — Mark Twain. 
Such is the new century message of America's humanitar- 
ian humorist, who is qualified, if any, to voice the sentiment 
of the bravest and best of the new world's manhood. Not 
sc pleasing a message as some gave, the Crier quite agrees 
— bitter medicine for a bad sickness. And even as he wrote 
"officers and gentlemen" of the British army were obscenely 
lampooning the holiest traditions of the Chinese race, 
voicing their bawdy jests in the most reverenced sanctuary 
on Chinese soil, the Temple of Heaven. That was not in 
keeping with the policy of the British, who have hitherto 
represented the fairest element in the Oriental Hypocrisy. 
God is good and may Westminster Abbey never be so rav- 
ished by a foreign soldiery. 

How near editorial opinion comes to the truth is shown 
in the varying opinions of great English editors as to what 
the newspaper of th'e twentieth century will be. C. Arthur 
Pearson, editor of the London Express, thinks that the new 
century journal will be a symposium of all thought from 
all sorts of writers, while Bruce S. Ingram of the Illustrated 
London News opines that the press of the future will spend 
most of its time turning off illustrations. Clement Scott 
of the London Free Lance, for his part, believes that illus- 
trations and fancy writing will go to the dogs in the future, 
and that the news, the whole news, and nothing but the news 
served up by telegraph will be all the matter of the daily 
press. The Crier, who, by the way, has not yet been con- 
sulted, believes that in 2001 people will still be folks and 
journalists editors, and that the prevailing dailies will be 
served up plain or fancy, solid or illustrated, as the case 
may be. 

Six-year-old Clifford Turk, who has set out alone to come 
all the way from Derby, Conn., to Pasadena, says that he will 
arrive according to schedule, unless the Cudahy kidnappers 
get him. If Papa Turk had the wealth of Papa Cudahy, 
probably little Clifford would not be traveling at the mercy 
of the conductors and porters, and unless Papa Turk were 
as rich as Papa Cudahy little Clifford will not be a shin- 
ing mark to the nappers of kids. So you see, Clifford, you 
are safe, unless you lose your ticket, in which case you can 
straddle the brake-heams, like the precocious little prodigy 
you are. 

The sole survivor of 182 ponies reserved for stew during 
the siege of Peking arrived from the Orient this week. 
Lucky animal to have survived the common embassadorial 
joke which began with "Have a horse on me!" 



The Crier it a Arm nponent of deportment* In newspaper*. 
init that all classes should 

I the depai 

■ 011111111. and the miniiiK column 
amo, and the financial column, 

at, in my opinion, 

I, ;ilir| lll.lt Is the . I 

re mine suit l.les daily than marrlagt 
big financial deals, and almost as many as than Ma church 
v, why shouldn't the suicide bo given his proper 
place and his proper section? This column would be handy 
and accessible to the searcher for thrills and would partially 
keep the fumes of gas and chloral from the nostrils of those 
who read the dally papers to get the n 

Why couldn't Goneral C. H. T. Collls have spoken up be- 
nd told us what actually did become of the lost Charlie 
Ross? It was unkind of the General to have kept us search- 
ing in Xt w Mexico and New Zealand , and where not for the 
boy who went to the bottom of North River these many years 
ago. But at last the strain is over, and we can turn more 
of our attention to the somewhat neglected tasks of dis- 
covering the author of "Beautiful Snow" and the where- 
abouts of Aguinaldo. 

The dirty public will insist on being too immaculately 
clean, and now the Park-goers are complaining that the 
benches that line the bosky dingles in Concert Valley, 
Golden Gate Park, rub off to the extent of a fresh coat of 
paint to every new suit of clothes brought in contact with 
those seats provided by a thoughtful municipality. What 
would you have, you dirty public? Benches that are war- 
ranted not to rub, rust, stain, run or lose their color? 
Such seats are only found in heaven, where they do not fur- 
nish public parks by contract. 

One phase of the grand New Year twentieth century cele- 
bration that was not half bad, or at all injurious, was the 
shipment of "Crooked Jack" Chretien to San Quentin. This 
act was less noisy than the fish-horn pandemonium of Market 
street, or even than that broadcast evangelical howl that 
traveled across the continent, but in its own small sphere 
of usefulness it was quite as Christian an act as either, my 
masters. 

The kidnappers are making Cudahy of Chicago sorry al- 
ready that he was "easy" to the extent of $25,000, and now 
thev are quoting the young of the Cudahy stock at $25,000 
per, or $500,000 a dozen. Will Cudahy continue to encourage 
the new industry as long as his money holds out, or will he 
feed a little of it to the Chicago police, making thereby a 
show of resistance against the leeches who prey on wealth? 
Since Cudahy's lost boy's return 

Have sleuths been on the go 
To scour the country East and West 
And find the brothers Crowe. 

And from the wide Nebraska fields 

A rural song is horn, 
Which sounds considerably like, 

"The Crowes are in the Corn." 

Mr. Scare Face Doyle, professional thug, has left his resi- 
dence in the Marin County jail for an outing in the Marin 
hills. Guards, telegrams, and searchlights are radiating 
from San Quentin as a reminder that the appliances for 
the re-capture of criminals is often better than those em- 
ployed for their retention. 

Pen and ink scientists like Flammarion and Tesla are look- 
ing for a twentieth century signal of congratulation from 
the people of Mars. The occupation of looking for messa- 
ges from the Maritans is a good one, as it shows no indica- 
tion of playing out, and will always make good profits for 
the astronomer who works on the Sunday supplement. 

Resident Chinese have promised to pay off the last $1,000 
on the burdensome debt against the sectarian university of 
the Pacific. Can students of diplomacy see what bearing 
this may have on the restriction of missionary immigra- 
tion into China? 

Acting Mayor Guggenheimer of New York telegraphed on 
New Years eve: "My best wishes to the people of San Fran- 
cisco. Let her go." And the idiot with the tin horn carried 
out instructions to the letter. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 



1 






LiOokorGn 



r 




Oh, jolly May Irwin, we're tickled to hear 
The oodles of pains that you're givin' 

To building a flat in the heart o£ New York 
For bachelors lonely to live in. 

We're glad the unmarried may live as they would 
With no inconvenience to rile 'em, 

A nickel-plate home for the lone and the lorn, 
A bachelor's happy asylum. 

We're glad of the comforts that you will provide 
(And that you know how, May, none better), 

A home for the homeless young swells of the town 
Where everything works to the letter. 

Oh, much I am tempted to move there myself, 
And be the most liberal patron — 

'Twould take less than minutes for me to decide 
If you were the kind-hearted matron. 

* * * 

A flea is a little thing not of much matter when his 
happy hunting ground is somebody else's cuticle, but when 
he elects to dine and roam on you he becomes bigger than 
an elephant and fiercer than a tiger. San Francisco is the 
home of the Great American Flea. We not only raise him 
in large quantities, nourished by our life's blood, but we 
name him without blush or pause in the best of our polite 
society. 

Say "flea" in London and you would have a drawing- 
room all to yourself in the space of a minute. And as for 
New York, you might as well talk about a — well, something 
not nice to have resident on one's person. New Yorkers 
will talk about cockroaches without a stammer, and call the 
domesticated bedbug, of which the metropolis has a goodly 
supply, by its common name; but "flea" — never! 

You and I who have grown up with fleas do not, perhaps, 
regard them as an obscenity. Uncomfortable creatures, 
with beak like a buzzard's and claws like a cat's, to be sure; 
but just as mentionable in our idiom as is the simple 
housefly. 

Some day I shall write an essay on The Flea, but in the 
meantime let me tell you something to which I was witness 
at the California Theater the other night. 

Directly in front of me sat a girl whose name has given 
writer's cramp to every society reporter in town. On her 
neck, fondly feasting, I espied a large, obese flea. Passion- 
ately he plied his beak into the sloping nape of her neck, 
and never a move from her, until suddenly her arm shot up 
and with the skill of a hunter she had him fast between 
thumb and forefinger. A moment of indirection, and then 
carefully she landed the reptile on the neck of the woman 
in front of her. 

Apparently all necks tasted alike to him, for the last I 
saw of him he was eating the powder and glycerine off a 
rough red foundation for a chemical wig. 

I don't know whether it is the actors or the plays that 
bring them, but certainly you will find more fleas to the 
neck in the playhouse than anywhere else. One of these 
days an enterprising management will advertise a flea- 
proof theater. 



Speaking of human skin reminds me of a fad that is fast 
becoming a mania among the younger fry attending the 
medical school, affiliated to our State University. The 
other day a student of not many months' experience called 
me aside and showed me a strip of fine, white leather, 
some three inches either way. It was tough and very 
pliable, and in substances somewhat thicker than doeskin. 
"Examine that closely," he said. "That was taken from 
the forearm of a body sent to us for dissection." "What do 
you intend doing with it?" I inquired, with a curious some- 
thing creeping up and down my spine. "Oh, I'll keep it as a 



curiosity," replied the pink and white youth carelessly. "I 
am having several pieces like this cured and tanned, and 
when I have gotten enough together I think that I'll make a 
sofa pillow out of them. Another fad we have is to collect 
tattoo marks. You see, the bodies of sailors are often 
taken to the dissecting room and the designs on their skin 
look very pretty when the leather is properly prepared." 

I turned away puzzled. Are parents sending their children 
to our State schools of medicine thus to make a mock of a 
high and holy science; to treat with such degenerate light- 
ness the human body, always sacred, entrusted to their 
keeping to study reverently for the good of the race? 
* * * 

"You never can tell what softness lies under a hard crust," 
said one of the mature members of the University Club at 
luncheon there a few days ago. "Out at the house we have 
a girl servant instead of a Chinaman to take in the stairs to 
scrub, give out the washing, shine the windows, carry coal 
and do the general housework. As I have frequently said 
to my wife, 'she is so tough that dynamite wouldn't make a 
dent fn her.' What with gum-chewing and heredity she has 
a jaw on her that would frighten even Barbour Lathrop; 
and 'pon my soul she spits through her teeth to catch a knot- 
hole in the backyard fence at fifteen feet. Put her on the 
stage just as she is and people would call it over-acting. 

"Well," continued the husband of the possessor of this 
proud gem, "I thought there was about as much of the 
milk of human kindness in that girl as there is in the three 
balls outside a pawnshop — until last week I went out with 

Overland Monthly 

JANUARY, 1901. 

SPE,CIAL FEATURES IN THIS NUMBER: 

Welcoming the Buddha's Most Holy Bones (Illustrated). 

By O. Brainard Spooner. 
Birds of Prey (Story). By Elizabeth Haight Strong. 
After-Life (Poem). By Park Barnitz. 
The Diary Habit (Essay). By Gelett Burgess. 
Sister Filomena (Story). By J. F. Rose-Soley. 
Mariposa Lilies (Poem). By L. Craigham. 
The Adventures of Shunyakclah (A Legend — Illustrated). 

By Frances Knapp. 
The Daughter of the Mayflower (Poem.) By Charlotte 

Leech. 
A Chinese Misalliance (Story). By A. B. Westland. 
Picturesque Guanajuato (Illustrated). By Clara Spalding 

Brown. 
Aloft (Poem). By Elizabeth Gerberding. 
A Lawyer-Poet's High Play at the National Capital. By 

George Selwyn. 
The Arrowhead (Illustrated). By Eugene Elton. 
California (Poem). By Annette Kohn. 

Indians of the Hoopa Reservation (Illustrated). By Theo- 
dore Gontz. 
Saved by a Mosquito (Story). By Fred Harvey Major. 
A Woman Who Has Lived (Illustrated). By Margaret Coy 

Kendall. 
Discontent (Poem). By Ina Wright Hanson. 
The Pan-American Exposition (Illustrated). By Henry 

Beever. 
Books: To read or not tc read. 
A Matter of Opinion. 



WELL. I An DELIGHTED 1 

After scribbllmr for years to find that with 

The American $11 Typewriter 

I can have up-to-date business methods at 
such a small cost. It is as well made as the 
htfirhcst-prlced machines, but more simple. 
Has stood the test: seven years without a 
competitor. Catalogue and sample of work 
free. 

AMERICAN TYPEWRITER CO.. 

F. A, Marriott. PttO. Coast Ael, b% Kearny St., 
San Francisco, California. 




January 5. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



11 



• U0, I "< n>H"> to ».'«■ bow thoy graft Iho skin on 

:> drl who wag 
soalpwj through haUim her hair caocbl In lh.> Ix-IUng at 
the factory. H uj do • ,i, lv Kirl» 

and women wit.- thrr p th'ir mi' 

many of them nir not unknown in go- 
to hu ,|iilt.- the modi in f or 
Ibis disfigured Rlrl 

didn't witness i f the 

skin, for It Is taken usually from the thlKh; bal the doctor 

explained. The part to be taken Is - ha B< at is 

lifted to tension by a pair of pinchers, ami with a pair of 

the bit of cuticle is snipped off. 

• Well, gentlemen, imagine my surprise to see my tough 
g-.rl come limping out of the skinnlng-room. She saw the 
look of amaze on my face and said: 

"•That'll be all right, boss; youse needn't worry about 
me not bein' able to do me work without no lay off. The doc 
only swiped eight pieres. and none of 'em was big enough to 
cover a five-cent piece. S'long.' 

"And out she limped. I told my wife to ask her what 
she wanted for a New Year's gift. 

'Well, if youse Is goin' to blow you'selves. I don't mind 
havin' a new sweater. This one's gittin' kinder bum around 
the chist works.' " 



From many mouths I've heard it told, 

How Adelina Patti, 
To Sir George Newnes having sold 
Fair Craig-y-Nos, her castle old. 

Will live in rooms more natty. 

And if the story, as it's told, 
Is built on gospel trueness, 

Then Patti's castle, since it's sold 

At once becomes, no longer old, 
Remarkable for Newnes. 
* * * 
You who are in politics may be for or forninst Mayor 
Phelan, but there is hardly an artist of any merit in the 
county who does not swear by him. Phelan not only buys 
pictures, but he puts them in places where the painters will 
receive the best possible benefit. A representative Peters 
and a Chinatown Joullin have honored positions on the walls 
of the Bohemian Club, thanks to the Mayor's generosity, 
and many of the other clubs and public places have profited 
from the same source. The latest benefactor is the Olympic, 
to which the Mayor has presented a Brittany fishing scene 
by Charles Dickman. That the canvas is representative 
oi Dickman at his best, all who saw it at the recent Art 
Institute exhibition will agree with me. 

By the way, they tell me that William Greer Harrison is 
endeavoring to work off an exhibition of the works of local 
painters for the Olympic Club. The artists, while willing 
to stand in, are hoping the scheme will not go through. 
The annual picture shows at the Bohemian have settled the 
fact that the members, not the outsiders, are the buyers, 
and I fear me much that there are very few members of 
the Olympic who would or could pay a decent price for a 
decent canvas. 



To Cure a Cold in One Day 

Take Laxative Bromo-Qulnine Tablets. All druggists refund 
the money if It fails to cure. E. W. Grove's signature is on each 
box. 25 cents. 



Under the management ot L. M. Greenhood, the Post- 
street Hammam Baths have been renovated in the most hy- 
gienic manner, and one may go there and have a Russian, 
or a Turkish, or an Electric or a Medicated Batn at any hour 
and be se. ved by skilled attendants, and be assured of per- 
fect cleanliness. 



THE CHALLENGE EXPLAINED. 



It has been reported to the Pattosien Co., that some of their com- 
petitors claim that this large furniture and carpet house don't sell 
all of their stock cheaper than others. The Pattosien Co. refutes 
this statement; they therefore organized this great Challenge Sale. 
Besides their already low prices they reduced the entire stock from 
15 to 30 per cent. The business done bv them since the opening 
challenge sale is wonderful. It is no wonder, when fine Moquette 
Carpet is selling at 95 cents per yard and good Brussels Carpet 45 
cents at 16th and Mssion streets. 



A Perfects Pure 011% e Oil of the line*! Quality and 
Delicacy of Flat or. 

Crosse S: BlackweWs 




Purveyors to the Queen 



Pure Lucca 



(Olive) Qj | 



Every Bottle Bears a Neck Label 
Guaranteeing Its Purity 



Sherwood & Sherwood, 

212-214 Market St., Importers. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE, 

California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 

For the Six months endiner December 31. 1900, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the Savings Department of this Company as follows: 
On Term Deposits, at the rate of three six-tenths {3 6-10) rer cent per 
annum, and on Ord nary Deposits at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum, 
free of taxes, and payable on and after Wednesday, January. 2. 1901. Divi- 
dends uncalled for are added to the principal and bear the same rale of 
dividend as the piincipal from and after January 1, 1901. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 

California and Montgomery Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1900, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Wednesday, January 2, 1901. 

GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 
33 Post street, San Francisco, Cat. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE- 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has b^e- declared at the rule of three and one-eight (Z%) 
per cent per annum O" all deposits for the six months ending: December 31. 
1900, free from all taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1901. 

December 28, 1900, ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Office— Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 

For the half year ending: with December 31. 1900, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one quarter f3M) per cent per annum on 
all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Wednesday, January 2, 1901 

GEO, TOURNY, Secretary. 

Office— 52G California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending: with the 31st of December, 1900, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate per annum of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per 
cent, on term deposits and three (3) per cent on ordinary deposits, free of 
taxes, payable on and after Wednesday. January 2, 1901. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Ofiice — 532 California St., corner Webb St., San Franoiaco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending December 
31, 1900, at the rate of three and one-fourth [ZV\) per cent per annum on all 
deposits free of taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1901. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same rate of dividend as the prin- 
cipal from and after January 1, 1901. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery St., cor. Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 




Now that the Producers - Oil Exchange 
Among the Oil has got fairly down to a working basis, 
Men. it may be hoped that something will be 

done to knock the methods of the com- 
panies operating on the floor into shape. At present the 
ideas of many managers are crude, as might naturally be 
expected when men find themselves mixed up in new lines 
of business with which they are not conversant. For in- 
stance, the cheerful manner in which the monthly financial 
statements are ignored would have brought them into the 
meshes of the law long ago, had the same eagle eye been 
kept upon them, ever on the lookout for delinquencies on 
the part of Comstock officials. The law here is very strict 
in regard to the posting of these monthly notices, and it is 
the duty of the exchange to see that it is complied with by 
all companies operating through it. If this is not at- 
tended to some of these new concerns will find themselves 
in trouble some bright morning. Then, again, there is a 
great lack of information in the way of reports as to 
progress of work, and weekly letters from superintendents 
should be on file to enable dealers to keep in touch with the 
situation. The business now has developed in importance 
sufficiently to warrant regulation of an order which will 
benefit clients. The share market has been quite strong 
during the past week and a number of stocks have been 
manipulated on a higher plane of values. Many opportuni- 
ties for money-making have offered in different lines of 
stock, and the attractions offered for speculators is broad- 
ening all the time. 

The Grand Pacific Oil Company has 

A Choice Invest- about closed out its second block of 

ment in Oil. 100,000 shares at a dollar per share, 

and those who intend purchasing any 
will have to subscribe at once, as the books on this block 
may close any day. The advantage offered is the rate t\ 
$1 per share at which this block is being sold, the next lot 
nf stock being held at $2.50 per share. This company is now 
having a well drilled in Contra Costa property and oil is 
brought up every bailing. This is considered very remarka- 
ble considering they are only down some 200 feet, and it is 
confidently expected from such favorable indications that 
this well is destined to prove a great producer. This is 
only a small portion of the company's holdings, which em- 
brace over 2,000 acres in the five leading oil districts of 
the State. These lands are located in the Coalinga, Kittle- 
man, McKittrick, Sunset and in Contra COsta. The Grand 
Pacific is ably managed by responsible people, and offers 
a safe and attractive investment for outside capital. 

The crash in London and Globe Finance 

The Big London Corporation, Limited, only excites sym- 

Failure. pathy for the unfortunate chairman, 

the Marquis of Dufferin. People who 
know this gentleman thought at the time he had made a 
mistake in allowing his name to be connected so promi- 
nently with an undertaking of the kind, and results have 
shown that their idea was correct. The failure has in- 
volved quite a number of firms and corporations, including 
a number of companies operating in Australia and British 
Columbia. It will be interesting to note before commenting 
at length upon the proposition to await the explanations of- 
fered by some of our esteemed London contemporaries, who 
are always so admirably posted upon Westralians, etc., more 
so, of course, than persons could be living outside the magic 
circle of Lombard or Tiirogmorton streets. Let us hope we 
are not on the eve of another Hooley sensation, with all its 
interesting revelations on the side. 

The year just closed shows the largest 
Immense Bank record of clearings since the local clear- 
Clearings, ing-house has been established, aggre- 
gating $1,029,582,595, against $971,015,- 
072 in 1899. Last month alone the clearings were $93,470,700, 
against $87,223,121 for 1899. 



The Barton Vineyard Company 
Reconstructing an Old- Limited is the name of the new 
Time Company. London organization which will 

take over property of the Barton 
Estate Company Limited, which in turn will go into liquid- 
ation. The new scheme of reconstruction involves the re- 
striction of debenture debt of the new company to £40,000, 
the creation of £20,000 new preferred shares of £1 each, and 
36,000 deferred shares at £1 each. Resolutions to this ef- 
fect have already been passed and an effort will now be 
made to effect changes which will put the property on a 
paying basis. It is many years now since the Barton estate 
passed into the hands of this English corporation, con- 
trolling lands in Fresno County laid out in vineyards. It 
has been a well-managed company from the start and any 
financial difficulties which have existed have resulted in 
the ordinary course of business and through no fault of 
those in charge. With care and economy there is no reason 
in the world why the new departure should not result in 
ultimate success. 

A strong tone in Con-Cal-Virginia has 

The Pine-Street marked the opening of the year on Pine 

Market. street, and it is generally hoped that 

this presages a better run of business 
than prevailed last year. All late reports from this mine 
speak most encouragingly, and the developments are said 
to be the most important encountered for years past. 
This ought to pull the market out of the rut it is in, to- 
gether with other improvements going on along the lode at 
one point and another. The installation of electrical ma- 
chinery is proceeding with all the expedition possible, and 
outside of the new hoists everything should be in running 
order within a few days. The new management of Gould 
& Curry will start the mill up again within a few days, 
and make a test run on a smaller quantity of ore per day 
than that crushed in the primary operations. By this means 
it is hoped to get better results and place the property on 
a self-supporting basis. Last year the total sales at all 
sessions of the San Francisco Stock Exchange were 5,344,768, 
against sales of 6,337,893 shares in 1899, a falling off for the 
past year of 993,125 shares. 



The oil tanks lying westerly from Santa Cruz, contiguous 
to the famous bituminous rock mines, are to be exploited by 
a local company. Oil indications have been abundant here 
for years, but heretofore the owners have refused to sell 
or lease. 



MISCELLANEOUS BONDS 

Bay Counties 5 5.000@101% Oceanic Bonds 5%.. 1.000(3110% 

California-street. 12,000(3119 S P of Arizona 6.... 3 000 0110^5 

Hawaiian Com 5 . 7.000 @ 103*4-103% 9VWW6S 1.000 @ 1 I4'<; 

LosAng Ry 5 7.000 (3111% S V W W i% 2 Mtg.. 20.000 103% 

Nor Ryof Cal 5%.. ..20,000 (9 110% U S Bonds (coui>)3„ 500® 111 

Oakland W 5 6.000 @ lul% 

STOCKS. 
Water. Shares. H'st L'st Sugar Stocks. Shares. H'st 

Contra Costa Water... 50 71 71 Hana 50 6% 

Spring Valley Water. 281 93% 93'4 Hawaiian 25 90 

Gas and Electric. Honakaa 260 31', 

Equitable 150 SH 8% HutobinBpn 770 25; 

Mutual Electric 50 9 9 Jfakaweli......... 3 ' 5 « 

Oakland Uns 10 49 s k 19' 3 Paauhau S PI Co 245 31"„ 

Pacific Gas Imp 110 45/4 15 Street Railroads. 

Pacific Light 5 44 44 MarketStreet 135 69% 

Gas and Electric 1600 47 44 '4 Miscellaneous. 

Powders. Alaska Packers 150 123% 

Giant 110 83% 83% California F dinners 1". 102% 



Vieorit 10J 3% 3% Cal Wine Assn 50 100 

Transactions for this week amount to 4,731 shares stock 

82,500 bonds against 5181 shares stock and 50,033 bonds for 

previous week. 
Monday and Tuesday of this week no meetings of the Board were 

held, the same being a holiday. 



69% 
123% 

103 '4 
100 
and 
the 



There is more Catarrh in this section of the country than all other dis- 
eases put together, and until the last few years was supposed to be inour- 
able. For a firreat many years doctors pronounced it a local disease, and 
prescribed local remedies, and by constantly fulling to cure with local 
treatment, pronounced it incurable. Science has proven catarrh to boa 
constitutional disease, and, therefore, requires constitutional treatment, 
Hall's Catarrh Cure, manufactured by F. J. Cheney & Co., Toledo, Ohio, Ib 
the only constitutional cure on the market. It is taken Internally In doses 
from 10 drops to a teaspoonful. It acts directly on the blood and mucous 
surfaces of the system. They offer one hundred dollars for any case it fails 
to cure. Send for circulars and testimonials. Address, 
„_ F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O. 

B®~ Sold by Druggists, 75c. 

Hall's Family Pills are the best. 



SOTJTHFIELD WELLINGTON COAL 
best results with least cost. 



January S. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IS 



LESSONS for CHILDREN 



Bt WALLACE IRWIN. 
nwmt nam ■>■•. 
Who la N 
In., le, 

"Is be Indeed a scientist 
Of 

And with his wonderful machines 

All leveled at the stars 
Do you believe he soon will got 

The latest news from Mars?" 

"Tcsla is not." mamma replied , 

"To any great extent 
What professional men would call 

A scientific gent; 

"In fact, If I must candid be, 

Tesla's profoundest lore 
Is bow to work his little job 

And draw his pay some more. 

"And even If he does attempt 

With foreign words to speak. 
Don't worry if you do not hear 

From Martian friends this week." 

"But, then, Mamma," Marie remarked, 
"I think, perhaps, don't you, 
"We'll have a page called 'News from Mars' 
In 18002?" 



BEWARE THE BUNCO CONDUCTOR. 

The Sabbath bells were ringing last Sunday morning 
just as Amadee Joullin was riding outside on a Sutter-street 
cai townward bound. There had been regular Christmas 
dinner at the Bohemian Club the night before, and maybe 
that had something to do with the hooded revery that over- 
lapped the dark brow of the painter of Aztec sandscapes. 
Anyway, Joullin was in deep thought, so that he did not 
see his very good friend and fellow-artist, Orrin Peck, as he 
stepped on the rear platform of that same Sutter-street car. 
Peck, however, noticed Joullin's dark brown study and as he 
walked through the car and out onto the dummy he tipped 
the wink to the gripman, and, leaning close to Joullin's ear, 
shouted: "Fare, please!" 

Joullin, like an honest man and peaceable, delved into a 
side pocket and produced a 50-cent piece, which he tendered 
to Peck without turning his head. Peck pocketed the silver, 
and walked back to the enclosed section of the car, where 
he unfolded a Sunday edition and fell into an abstraction 
that rivalled Joullin's; and as he read trouble of many 
kinds was in the process of generation in that peaceful 
Sutter-street car on that equally peaceful Sabbath morn. A 
few minutes later there came a sound of many voices from 
the open section and the notes of Joullin in prayerful male- 
diction alternated by the burr of an Irish conductor, who 
kept saying something about the police. Affairs at last 
waxed so unbecoming to the day and the place that Peck 
came to the rescue and paid the fare himself. What he 
did with the 45 cents change history absolutely refuses to 
state. 



An Enormous Industry. 



Our enormous facilities, tremendous output, rapid movement of 
greeds always fresh in the hands of consumers, insures the Gall 
Borden Eagle Brand Condensed Milk the first place in American 
homes. 



THE NICKEL PLATE ROAD (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R.) 

offers East bound passengers three elegantly appointed ves- 
tibuled express trains daily between Cnicago and New York 
and Chicago and Boston. For sleeping car reservations and 
full information address Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast Pas- 
senger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country Tel. Main. 1042. 



OH Stocks 



PORTER & CHENEY, 

l . 5. Licensed Brokers 

BUY or SELL ALL STOCKS. 

530 CALIFORNIA ST. 



nining flachinery 



and 
Supplies 



The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 

Unntington Centrifugal Roller Mill 

Bartlett Concentrating Table 

James Ore Feeder 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers 

Two and Three Stamp Mil's 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps 

Wood- Working and Iron- Working Machinery 

PARKE & LACY CO., 2I and 23 Fremont St 

__ \ 8an Francisco 

769,100 shares of OIL STOCKS 

have been Bought and Sold from January 1, to December 31, 1000 
by JOSEPH B. TOPL1TZ . 

Oil Stock Broker. Member Producers' Oil Exchange, Rooms 9-10, 
330 Pine Street, San Francisco. Tel. Bush 385 

THE JOHN M. KLEIN 
ELECTRICAL WORKS. 

Manufacturers and dealers in Electrical Supplies, con- 
struction and maintenance. Railroad, telephone and 
automobile supplies. Established 1879. Incorporated 1897 

421-423 MONTGOMERY ST., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone, Main 389. 

Removal Notice! 

The Pacific Saw Manufacturing Company have re- 
moved from 17-19 Fremont to 110-112 Beale Street 
San Francisco. 

Saws of every description on hand and made to order. 

n. ISaaC JoneS, rl. D. Eye . Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office — 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 
streets, S. F. Hours, 10 a. m. to 4. p. m. 



Sunday by appointment. 



Tel. Grant 101. 



Worthington Ames 

Member Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

8afe Deposit Bulldlne. 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1381 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Obookeb Building, San Francisco. 

THE AWARD AT 

CHICAGO, 1893 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-1839. These pens are "the 
beat in the world." Sole aerent for the United States 
Mb. Hbnbt Hob, 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, 



A. B. TREADWELL Attorney-at-Law 

(Formerly Judee Police Court No. 4) 

HAS RESUMED PRACTICE at 533 Kearny St., cor. Sacramento St. 
All legal business attended to promptly. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 



'9 J Vintage will not be in your market until 
APRIL J, J90J. 





IjtftSl 




Full Quart Bottles . . $1.25 
One Gallon Jugs . . . 3.80 
Half Gallon Jugs . . 2.00 
Twice its price will buy none better. 



College San Rafael 



For Young Ladies 



Conducted by the Sifters of St. Domlnlo. 
Pull eollegic course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
trade. Superb modern building:. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms, 

Located In the lovely Maernolla Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael. San Rafael, Ca). 



H. J. Stewart 



Teacher of Vocal and 
Instrumental Music i 



Studio : 1406 Van Ness Avenue 



THE PACIFIC COAST REGULAR 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



Season Begins May 1, 1901. 



Four years' course. University Graduates allowed one year advanced 
standing. All lectures between 6 p. in. and 10:^0 p. m. Address. College 
Building, 818 Howard St. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of John McCarthy Deceased. 
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned. P. Boland, Administrator of 
the Estate of John McCarthy deceased, to the creditors, of, and all persons 
having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers, within fourU) months after the first publication of this notice, to 
the said P. Boland, Administrator at his place of business No. 238 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, the same being his place for the transaction 
of the business of the said estate in the City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California. 

P. BOLAND, 
Administrator of the Estate of John McCarthy. Deceased. 
M. C. HASSETT. Attorney for Administrator. 

308-10-12 Phelan Building, San Francisco. 
Dated at San Francisco, December 8th.. 1900. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enj oy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the theater 
over. 

C. A. Murdock & Co., PRINTERS_^ 

No- 532 GLA-r STREET, 8- F. 




Not for many years has a Christmas tide heen so generally 
observed in our social world as the one which marked the 
close of the century. Entertainments have run the gamut 
trom the smallest to the largest, the most simple to the 
elaborate affair, and with it all there has been such an air 
of absolute pleasure and good will. 

The Presidio kept up its end of the Christmas festivities; 
indeed, the Red and White hop last Friday was one of the 
prettiest sights imaginable and our city belles were there 
in force. At the officers' quarters jollity reigned supreme — 
dinners, cards, eggnog parties and Christmas tree frolics 
have been as numerous as there are homes at that post. 

But a few years ago it was considered the correct thing 
to rush away from the city to one of our summer resorts 
to spend the Yuletide and the game of follow the leader 
was played with such success that hardly a family of the 
swim ate their Christmas dinners in town. Second thoughts 
have come, however, with the result that this winter 
home Christmas dinners and Christmas tree parties were 
the rule and not the exception, and New Years was selected 
as a better time for country frolics. The Blingumites seem 
to have gone to their villas at that suburban retreat en 
masse and taken friends with them, while many of our 
maidens fair were members of house parties at San Jose, 
and even as far south as Bakersfield, where Mrs. McKittrick 
has been entertaining a few of her friends. 

At the Concordia Club the guests witnessed a burlesque 
play; at the Verein a vaudeville entertainment, and at both 
the stage performances were followed by supper and then 
dancing was indulged in till a late hour. 

Eggnog parties were so numerous New Year's day that it 
was strongly reminiscent of the old-time New Year's calls, 
with this difference, that then men only were the visitors 
to be entertained, while this year a goodly proportion of 
those who partook of that insidious concoction were young 
ladies . 

The Yale Glee and Banjo Club has come, seen and con- 
quered, and the members have been the lions of the hour 
this week. Between the reception on Thursday afternoon, 
the concert at Metropolitan Hall on Thursday evening, fol- 
lowed by the ball in Maple Hall of the Palace, there did 
rot seem to be much spare time for them, but what odd 
moments there were they filled in most satisfactorily to 
themselves and the pleasure of their friends. Yesterday 
was full of social events for them, and their concert at 
Metropolitan Hall in the afternoon was a fashionable 
crush. 

Mrs. Dutton was a dinner hostess on Tuesday evening, 
and on Thursday evening dinners were given by the Misses 
O'Connor in honor of the bride-elect, Miss Margaret Cole, 
and by Miss Kate Dillion, her guests going afterward to the 
ball at the Palace. 

Last night the third of the Friday" fortnightly gatherings 
followed closely after the ball of the night before, but who 
among our younger set would let any amount of fatigue 
keep them from those popular dances? 

This evening Miss Edna Hopkins and Will Taylor will 
be guests of honor at a dinner to be given by Mrs. J. B. 
Crockett. 

The New Year has opened with the announcements of 
several engagements of interest in the swim. First came 
the news of that of Miss Ethel Dimond and Will Sherwood, 
which caused quite a flutter, possibly because Mr. Sherwood 
was considered a confirmed bachelor; he was so hard to 
please. Then followed the news that Miss Eugenie Santa 
Marina and Harry Rogers had decided to take each other 
"for better or for worse" in the near future, and thirdly 
that the wedding of Miss Margaret Cole and Lieutenant 
Crimmins, U. S. A., would take place during the month 
of January, the formal announcement of their engage- 
ment being made at a dinner given them by Mrs. Martin 
last Sunday evening. 



January 5, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



18 



irlle-st wedding* of the n«>w century was 
•> Hallle llydo nn<l William II Irwin, which tM 
rated nn Htm ^ .if the 

Mrs. David Blxlar, In Pk 

mony waa perform.. I by the It. v |i r HcClura, the bridal 
party standing beneath ■ canopy of cardinal silk placed in 
ih" drawing-room, which was oil irnad with Unllax, 

holly berries and large bowkaota of cardinal rlh!.»n. The 

who was given away by her uncle, wore a rC 
cream crepe de chine, trimmed with point lace, and carried 
n bouquet of bride's roses; she was attended by Miss Oraee 
as maid of honor, who was gowned in blue chiffon over 
white silk, and carried n bouquet of red carnations. Charles 
K. Field supported the groom as best man. 

The Hotel Del Coronado has during the holiday week sur- 
passed the reputation of its hitherto famous cuisine, and 
delightfully artistic menus have surprised the guests each 
day. Among celebrities who enjoyed the hospitality of 
the house were: United States Senator George C. Perkins, 
De Putron Gllddon, Paul de Longprf, Raphael Peixotto and 
Rear Admiral Kautz. 

On the 2d of February the Benefit Ball of the Mount Zion 
Hospital will take place in Maple Hall, and nearly all the 
leading ladies of Jewish circles are on the committee now 
arranging for it: and on the 19th a Mardi Gras ball will be 
given at the Art Institute in California street. 

Miss Leontine Blakeman's friends are all delighted that 
she has reconsidered her intention of spending this winter 
in the East and will remain here in San Francisco, where 
she is a universal favorite. The proverbial "little bird" is 
whispering that this charming young lady will join military 
ranks ere the year is old. 

Another popular belle. Miss Azalea Keyes, has returned 
from her wanderings abroad, having made a tour of the 
world since bidding us au revoir last spring. 

Our young society has been called upon of late to bid 
adieu to some of its most popular members, and the regret 
was general at the departure of the Misses Edith and 
Norma Preston, who, with Mrs. Preston, sailed for Japan 
last Saturday, with the understanding that California will 
not see them again until next autumn at the earliest. 

Then, sprightly Miss Addie Murphy has taken herself 
away to enjoy the gay doings of Gotham and Washington 
away to enjoy the gay doings of Gotham and Washington, 
and a whisper is afloat that as Miss Murphy San Francisco 
society is not likely to see much of her in the future. 

Dr. W. J. Younger dropped in upon his numerous friends 
a few days ago to pay them a brief visit ere returning to 
the delights of gay Paree. Mr. and Mrs. Willie Babcock 
and Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Blanding are among the visitors 
at Coronado at present. Dr. Guy T. Edie, U. S. A., is now 
en route home on the transport Sheridan, and is expected 
to arrive about the first of February. 

Dr. H. J. Stewart has issued invitations for an evening 
concert by his pupils on Tuesday next at 140C Van Ness 
avenue. 

Many of the fashionable people of San Francisco are lin- 
gering by the soft Pacific breezes that blow across the hotel 
Del Monte where weather remains so equable as to make the 
lingering guest loth to return to the northern winter. 
Though the Christmas week has past good cheer still reigns 
at the Del Monte, and this inter-season is the most brilliant 
yet seen at that famous hostelry. 

There is golf and excursions and sport and outing of all 
kinds at the Hotel Rafael, San Rafael, where the guests, 
surrounded by ever-blooming flowers, have forgotten that 
it is winter anywhere and are enjoying that delightful blend 
of nature and good living which has made the Hotel Rafael 
famous the length and breadth of the continent. 

Mr. George E. Morse, clerk of the United States District 
Court, is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Ahner McKinley in New 
York. Before returning home he will again visit the Presi- 
dent in Washington, where he was staying during the 
holidays. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street. San Francisco. 



Artistic Hardwood Grilles 
Made to order. Prices reasonable. Pacific Grille Co., Adams' 
Building, N. E. corner Sutter and Ke y streets. 




A Skin of Itc.iutv l» a Joy Porevcr. 

pwR. T. iim\ (lOlikAl l>'> ORIENTAL 
m *-> CREAM, OR MAOICAL BBAUTIPI8R. 

■ T*n, ri.ni.tr,. Frfcklca. 

Moih 1-m.i.. - 

Ml). I .telle- .1. N. ■!(...,. I 
icfll ..I M > . ..r, nn. I I- . 

"'• UA, „ |,„|y . | II,,. 

haul-ton 

will ..-.- I',, m, r r. ■ '...,, .i.-.i. I 'OoUF 

'".'I'- ' r .,' n« the lrn.il hnri.it.il.it 

nil the skin preparation*." For unto 
!■>' nil druirgi'l* n.,.1 Fancy-go.,.!* 
|t««leraln the United State* Canada* 
... .1 Ki. . 

FEHD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
B7 '.'rent .lone* street. N. ¥, 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

Belcher Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal plncc of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location ol 

works— Hold Hill. Storey county. Nevada. 

N-.tkc i*. hcreliy civen that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the third day of January, 1901, an assessment. (No. 07) oi Ten cent* per 
share wns levied upon (he capita] stock ot the corporation, pnyablo Im- 
mediately in United stales cold coin, to the secretary, at the oflice of the 
room 37, third floor. Mills Building, corner Bush and Montgomery streets. 
Snn Francisco. Cnl. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 6th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1901. 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale nt public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 27th dny of 
February, 1901. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F. E. DIETZ. Secretary. 

Office — Room 37. third floor Mills Building, northeast corner Bush and 
Montgomery Sts.. San F rancisco. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco, California; location 
of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey county. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Direotors. held 
on the 28th day of December, 1900. an assessment (No. 35) of five cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States gold coin, to the secretary at the oflice of the com- 
pany, room 29, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery St.. Snn Francisco. Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
1st DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1901 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction : and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 21st day of Febru- 
ary. 1901 to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

A. W. HAVENS. Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, Cal 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 80 

Amount per share Scents 

Levied December 28, 1900 

Delinquent in office January 31. 1901 

Day of sale of delinquent stock February 21, 1901 

ALFRED K. DURBROW. Secretary. 
Oflice: Room 57. Nevada Block, 3 9 Montgomery St., S. F. Gal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal, Location of 
works — Gold Bill. Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, beld 
on the 27th day of December 1900, an assessment (No. 81) of five cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately in United States gold coin to the secretary, at the oflice of the 
company, room 35. third floor. Mills Building, nortbease corner Bush and 
Montgomery street. San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 30th DAY OF JANUARY, 1901, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is made bofore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 20th day of 
February. 1901, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES NEWLANDS, Secretary. 

Office, Room 35. third floors. MilisBuilding, northeast corner of Bush and 
Montgomery street, San Francisco California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association. 

For the year ending December 31, 1900, declared a dividend of 5 per cent 
per annum on ordinary deposit sand G per cent on term deposits. 

WILLIAM CORBIN, Secretary. 
Office— 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

For the six months ending December 31. 19(10. a dividend has been de- 
clared upon Term Deposits at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per 
cent per annum upon Ordinary Deposits at the rate sf three (3) per cent, per 
annum, free of taxes, payable on and after January 2, 1901. 

S. L. ABBOT .IE. . Secretary. 

Office: 223 Montgomery street, Mills Buiiding.San Francisco, Cal. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 



Bubbles from the Swim. 



By LADY ALGY, 



The California girls who are wintering in Washington 
are having a glorious time. Anna Voorhies, Addie Murphy, 
Susie Blanding, and of course the McKenna girls, are prov- 
ing to the Washingtonites that California girls are very 
charming and clever. 

The McKenna girls are in the sacred inner circle of the 
official life, owing to their father's position. They are very 
much admired, and the little birds who warble secrets in- 
sist that Isabel McKenna has at last been caught in Dan 
Cupid's toils. Isabel has had admirers in every legation 
in the capital. But though, with apologies to "Pinafore," 

She might have wed a Roossian 

A Frenchman, Turk, or Proosian, 

Or perhaps an Ital-i-an; 

But in spite of all temptation 

To marry another nation, 

She prefers a plain Amer-i-can! 

Anna Voorhies is dividing her time between Virginia and 
Washington. Her sister Leila, who married Lieutenant Guy 
Scott, is down in Virginia, and "Snooksy," as Anna is called 
by her intimates, foregoes some of the Washington gaie- 
ties in order to be with Leila. 

When in Washington Anna divides her time with her 
other married sister, and Senator and Mrs. Scott, who have 
not only fallen in love with daughter-in-law Leila, but -with 
all the Voorhies girls. I think if I were asked to name the 
most affable, sweet-natured girls in San Francisco I should 
select the Voorhies. The only trouble with them is that 
they are so popular. that they are carried off before their 
second season. Leila was married almost immediately after 
her formal bow to society, following on the heels of Anna's 
engagement to Tom Bishop. 

Marie Voorhies, the oldest of the family, has strenuously 
resisted the little blind god's wiles, and despite much urg- 
ing to the contrary, pursues a course of single blessedness. 
Anna Voorhies is expected home in spring, but her mar- 
riage to young Bishop is still indefinite. He is at present at 
a law college, earning a sheepskin as a fore-runner to a 
marriage license. 

The Bishop boys develop heart affairs while still at college, 
but Bishop pere withholds a "bless you, my children" until 
the boys have learned to run their own skiffs. Jim Bishop 
has been engaged these many moons, and I hear his mar- 
riage-day is set for an early date. Tom will probably be 
taken into his father's law office, after graduating, and then 
the wedding bells will ring out for sweet Anna Voorhies. 
* * * 

"The Cole girls are trumps," said a club Johnnie, the 
other day. He had expressed the desire of finding a home 
in a private family away from the din of hotel life. A 
friend gave him an address, and imagine his surprise when 
he found himself in the Cole drawing-room stammering, 
out his errand to Miss Margaret. "Awfully sorry I got the 
wrong number," he explained, "but the fault's partly the 
maid's for calling you. I told her I was looking for a board- 
ing place." 

"There isn't any mistake about it," answered Miss Mar- 
garet in a quiet, dignified way; "we are keeping boarders, 
but we couldn't accommodate you just now." 

"She might have denied it, since they couldn't make room 
for me," quoth the club Johnnie afterwards, "but she held 
her head like a thoroughbred and took the fence like a gen- 
tleman." 

Since the death of their father the Coles have been 
forced to consider the pros and cons of living, and solved 
the problem by taking outsiders into their big beautiful 
home — really converting it into a private boarding house. 
It. takes grit and courage for girls like Bessie and Margaret 
Cole to acclimate themselves to such conditions, but they've 
shown that they're true blue. And their friends of the 
gilt-edge days have with scarcely an exception been most 
considerate. The girls are still invited everywhere worth 
going, and like sensible maidens have no false pride about 
accepting. 

Forsooth an' why should they? For does not Mrs. Salis- 
bury keep boarders sub-rosa! 



Hotel Bartholdi, 



THE very center of the city, convenient to 
all Ithe big stores and all places of amusement. 
European plan, Jtt a day and upwards. 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Sauare Park) 
Finest cafe in this city. 



Milton Roblee. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Wm. B. Hooper, Manager 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

San Francisco 



RIGGS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C. 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 



of tbe National Capital. First-class in all appointments. O. G. 
Staples, President; G. Devitt, Treasurer. 

American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

Paraiso Hot Springs 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 



Monterey County, Cal. 



C. T. Komie, Proprietor 



J. B. Pon. I Pierre Carreer. Founder of Malson Tortonl. I C. Lalaxne 

Old Poodle Doq Restaurant 

445 Bush street, cor. Grant Avenue, San Francisco 
Lunch, 60 cts. Dinner, 75 cts. Also, a la carte. 



I. Deutch, Proprietor. 

Crystal Palace 



Telephone, Main 5544 



5 Kearny St., 12 Geary St., S. F. Cal. 



Choice Wines and Liquors. 



Cafe Royal, 



Corner Fourth and Market streets. San Francisco. 
Try our special brew steam and lager beer, 5 cents. 
Overcoats and valises checked free. 



CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT CO. 



Proprietors 



Fifth floor. Mills Building San Francisco 



l"*1 ;i-. , ,-trt j-, »-. Kill «%***« Santa Cruz and King City. 
DltUmen MineS Monterey county, Cal. 

Contractors for all kinds of street work, bridges and railway constructio d 
wharves, jetties and seawalls. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Bullion Mining Company. 

The Regulsr Annual Meeting ef the stocknolders of the Ftillimi Mining 
« onipnny will be held at Ibc office of the Company, room 14, 331 Pine street 
Sau Francisco. Cal. on 

THURSDAY, the 10th DAY OF JANUARY. 1031, 
lit the hour of 1:30 o'clock, for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors 
to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other business a* 
may come before the meeting 

R. R, GRAYSON, Secretary. 
Office— Room 14, 331 Pine street, San Fra cisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Spring Valley Water Works. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Spring Valley Water 
Works wll be held at the office of the company. 12*> Stockton St.. San 
Francisco, Cal., at 12 oVock M . on Wednesday, the 9th day of .Tnmmry 
1901. to elect trustees to serve for the ensuing year mid fur the trmieat ion 
ofsuofa other business as may come before the meeting. 

PELHAM W. AMIC3, Secretary 

San Francisco, Cal.. 



January 5. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 




When a Smith Sound tCsqulmo .liw- 

:ly has regard only to linuse wifely qualities, 
.Mr Walter A Wyi khotT. in ..n. -r. S'le 

must noklng, and t" lew, tod to chew 

hides. This Inst is a aloe qua Don. Furs are the only 
possible in ilry. t li • y ire, of course, as slllt as 

boards, and before they can be made Into garments the 
fibres must be broken. Accordingly the women bend the 
hide double, making I creaM through its length. Beginning, 
then, at one end, they chew steadily to the other. Then in- 
creasing the hide a little further on. they ehew again, and 
I the slni|>le proress until every Inch of the surface 
has been I hewed, and. With fibres broken, the skin is llexible 
enough to be sewed into garments. 

A>. says the Liverpool Daily Posl. Mr. T. P. O'Connor 

is at present figuring rather prominently before the Liver- 
pool public the following two anecdotes, told by Justin Mc- 
Carthy, may prove interesting: A lady, in the presence of 
^lie witty member lor Scotland Division, remarked of a 
certain M. P. "that it was a great pity for the sake of his 
personal appearance, that he had such large ears." "Yes." 
sain T. P.. and the worst of it is that, while they are too 
large for ears, they are too small for wings." On another 
on. when the conversation turned on an absent friend 
who conceived he had an undoubted gift for music and dis- 
tinct faculty for reform, somebody asked whether the per- 
son in question was always "playing the fiddle." "Well," 
replied T. P.. "I do not know that he is always playing the 
fiddle or the fool." 

The Rev. W. H. P. Arden, acting-chaplain to .he 

Forces at Winchester, agrees with the condemnatory re- 
marks which the Globe made recently on the question of 
exposing missionaries' wive.; ana children to such horrors 
as those of which we have lately heard from China. Mis- 
sionaries have, says Mr. Arden, no right to marry; and hav- 
ing regard to the fact that upwards of fifty children have 
been tortured and butchered in China during the present 
..rouble, he urges that it is time to call attention to the use- 
less sacrifice of the lives of children in the mission field. 

A curious instance of the accuracy with which fore- 
casts founded on figures can be made has came to light. 
In the July number of the North American Review an arti- 
cle appeared called "Forecast of the Twelfth American Cen- 
sus," by Mr. Mulhall, the well-known statistician, in which 
the prediction was made that the census would show a popu- 
lation of 76,200,00, instead of 77,500,00, as given in the 
Statistical abstract, 'rue official report is now published, 
and the official result is 76,295,000. 



"Argonaut" Whisky is and always was a credit to the 

trade, being manufactured more with reference to giving 
satisfaction than to being sold, and as a consequence it is the 
brand that is sold because it gives satisfaction. Possessing 
a bouquet like wine and an oily richness that does no vio- 
lence to the inner man, it does not endanger the nerves of 
those who drin». it, as inferior whiskies do. It is consumed 
by drinkers, not drunkards, and is a gentleman's drink. E. 
Martin & Co., 54 First street, sole agents for the United 
States. 



It is an art to serve a luncheon so that a patron can 

get what he wants in a short space of time and yet get it 
hot and neatly served. That is what the Original Vienna 
Bakery, 205 Kearny street, can do and are doing every day. 
Every modern appliance, including the steam table which 
keeps dishes hot on hand, has been obtained, with reference 
t) giving you the best there is to be had, in a hurry. The 
Original Vienna Bakery's extra mince pies and plum pud- 
dings are famous, and will be delivered when ordered. 



Kelly's Corn Cure. 

Eddy street. 



Never fails. For sale only 102 




f //' 






m 



Cap J4.482.750 

I «~^«~ A,.,-..,,.,,.,, Capital Paid Op 2,241,375 

London Assurance A ^,. ls 19,195.145 

pita) Subscribed ss.ooo.ooo 

n,- =r« M=^;^ Capital Paid Up 500,000 

Ocean Marine Ass ,„ s 2>502050 

City Index and Purchasers' Gu i de. 

RESTAURANTS. 

POODLE DOG Restaurant. N. E. corner Eddy and Mason Sis.. 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone. Main 429. 

A. B. Blanco & B. Brun. 

LAY .STATE OYSTER HOUSE AND GRILL ROOM, 16 Stock- 
ton street and 109 OFarrell street. N. M. Adler. Proprietor. 
Telephone, Main 5057. 

BERGEZ RE&l'AURANT-Rooms for ladles and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez. Proprietor. 

NEVADA RESTAURANT, 126-130 Geary street. Private roo.ns 

for parties. 'Phone. Main 1179. Noel P. Loupy. Proprietor. 

FELIX'S ROTISSER1E. Felix Gouailnardou, Prop. 537 Califor- 
nia street, below Kearny. Private rooms for families and ban- 
quets. Telephone Black 2906. 

MAISON TORTONI, French Rotisserle, 111 O'Farrell street. 
Private dining rooms; banquet hall. S. Constantini, Pro- 
pnetor. 

HOTELS. 

PALACE AND GRAND HOTELS— Connected by overhead pas- 
sageway; under one management. Palace Grill Rooms a fea- 
ture. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL— a quiet home centrally located; flrst- 

class. Wm. B. Hooper, Manager. 
RUSS HOUSE— J. S. Young, Proprietor. Leading business and 

family hotel. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
YV. F. GREANY. 827 Brannan street. Selections on approval; any 
place in the world. 

BOILER MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Ironworks, 314-316-3*8 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

DIt. G. S. MOORE'S Scientific Hair Restorer. A Sure and Posi- 
tive Cure, one bottle will convince the most skeptical. Testi- 
monials, 488 Geary St., San Francisco. 

MRS. MARY M. JOHNSON, Psychic Palmist; Automatic Writer, 
St. Ann's Bldg., room 37, cor. Powell & Eddy. Hours 10 to 4. 



BROOKS-FOLLIS 
ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

527 Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Importers and Jobbers of ElCCtriCal SUpDlJCS 
Tel. //lain 861. 

CieOrge (JOOdman, p a i e ntee andManuJacturer ol 

Artificial Stone 

CSchillineer's Patent) in all its branches, 
Sidewalk and irunlun walk a specially. 

Office- 317 Montgomery street, Nevada block, San Francisco 
Blake. Moffitt & TOWne Telephone Main 199 

Dealers in PAPER 



Blake, Moffit & Towne, Los AneeleB. 
Blake. McFall & Co., Portland Or. 



55-57-59-61 First street, S. F. 



Weak Men and Women ^^TiSSSSTr^S 

It irives health and strength to the Sexual Ore-aim. Depot at 323 Market 
street San Francisco. Send for circular. 



1S 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 




The News Letter wishes the insurance men — Are, life, 
accident and casualty — a happy New Year, an increase of 
rates and lines, a decrease of losses, an increase of 
salary and a decrease of expenses, the utter abolition of 
rate cutting and rebating, the non-flndable loss of the 
Hammer, and paralysis of the arms of the Knockers, good- 
will and good-fellowship, mutual respect, and the repeal of 
the stamp tax. If all these conditions can be achieved there 
will not be any insurance men left; the Milennium will have 
arrived, and the insurance fellows will be angels — even 
the nonboarders, twisters, and rate-cutters. 

* * * 

Bleeding Kansas! The Insurance Commissioner of that 
State will recommend to the Legislature the enactment of 
some effective laws against mutual livestock and hail in- 
surance companies. He wants all mutual livestock insur- 
ance companies in the State abolished and all mutual hail 
insurance companies organized under the Kansas laws con- 
fined in their operations to the counties in which they are 
organized, since when they attempt to do business outside 
of their counties they generally fail, and the Commissioner 
will attempt to prevent this by amending the Kansas laws 
regarding their organization. There are no hail companies 
in California, and not a single livestock company left. 

* * • 

The Commercial Insurance Company and the Vernon In- 
surance and Trust Company of Indiana, .je Manufacturers' 
Insurance Company of Bay Cicy and the Continental Fire 
Association of Fort Worth, Texas, all of which are under- 
grounders, have had juugments and fines amounting to $20,- 
000 entered against them in the United States Circuit Court 
of Illinois. The defendant companies were charged with 
doing business in Illinois without a license from the Insur- 
ance Commission. 

* * • 

The appointment of Henry W. Bush as Western manager 
of the Fire Association, to succeed the late W. H. Cunning- 
ham, has been announced. Mr. rsush has been with the Fire 
Association over twenty-five years, and had been assistant 
manager since 1892. 

* * * 

Minnie C. Hopkins has sued the Modern Woodmen of 
America. Her son held a policy for $2,000, payable in event 
of his death to his mother. A year ago he was accidentally 
killed. The Woodmen then discovered that Hopkins had 
been SO cents short for nine days on his lost premium, and 
refused to pay the claim. For an organization that howls 
and preaches fraternity this looks bad. It would appear 
that the precise value of love for a deceased brother Wood- 
man, where $2,000 is in question, is just about 80 cents for 
nine days. 

* * * 

The Connecticut Fire has reinsured the St. Louis Mutual 
Fire, which has been doing business since 1881. 

* * * 

The Columbus Mutual Life Association, an assessment 
fake of Illinois, has been examined by the Insurance Com- 
missioner of that State and found insolvent. 

* * * 

President Register of the National Association of Life 
bnderwriters has sent out a circular to local associations 
and managers of companies, urging them to have all policy 
holders write personal letters to their Congressmen urging 
the repeal of the insurance stamp act. 

* * * 

Louis w'einmann, secretary of the Fireman's Fund, has 
received notice of the safe arrival in New York of his wife 
and family on their return home from a tour of the Conti- 
nent. 

* * * 

The Christmas number of the Insurance Sun is extremely 
creditable. 



John Marshall of Marshall & McElhone, managers at 
Chicago of the central department of the Fireman's Fund 
Insurance Company, is in the city, greeting his many friends. 

* * * 

The Associated Assurances Companies, Limited, consist- 
ing of the Munich Reinsurance Company, Limited, and the 
Alliance Assurance Company, Limited, will continue the 
business heretofore conducted by the Associated Compa- 
nies, by the Alliance Assurance Company, Limited, of Ber- 
lin. The Munich Reinsurance Company will, as heretofore, 
be interested in every risk accepted by the Alliance. Gutte 
& Frank are the Pacific Coast managers. 

* * • 

At the time of writing there is absolutely nothing new in 
regard to the Scottish Union and National matters. 
* • * 

President Dutton of the Fireman's Fund returned from his 
trip to the Hawaiian Islands in time for the holidays. 

» * * 

E. B. Holden has returned from a trip to the East. 



Anything in the way of suits, gloves, laces, tapestries 

and the like may be cleaned to the best of satisfaction at the 
Spaulding cleaning and dyeing establishment, 127 Stockton 
street, where the most modern appliances, the most skilled 
and most conscientious workmen and the most moderate 
prices make a bid for your patronage. Don't grieve if you 
did not get any new clothes or a set of window draperies 
for Christmas. Send what you have to Spaulding, and he 
Mill make them new again. 



Zinkand's comes next after the theater, you will find, 

if you follow the best people. Stark's orchestra plays the 
best music and the cuisine serves the best things to eat, and 
its wine and beer are unexcelled in Europe or America. 



—John W. Carmany still makes shirts, stylish and well-fitting. 
He Is at room 32, second floor Chronicle Building. 



A Joint Income 
While You Live 

The New Policy just issued. by the 
Mutual Life Insurance Company of 
New York 



Enables a man not only to provide an income for life to his 
wife, but secures an income for himself as well. 

Under its terms a father may obtain a life income and at 
the same time contingently secure the same for a child. 
Or a brother may provide for himself and for a sister, or a 
son for himself and a parent. 

It offers the very best form of insurance investment at' 
the lowest possible cost, and it is a contract whose fulfill- 
ment is guaranteed by the Greatest Financial Institution of 
its kind in the world. 

For full information as to details apply to 



A. B. FORBES & SON, San Francisco, Cal. 

General Agents The Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York. 

RICHARD A. McCURDY, President. 



January 5, 190t. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



It 



ll Hull. linn 
Tho 



meat of ti. 
ami I sun Association in out in tl 
repor' with figures to show I osper- 

Ity of (ho association, as Is eridoncad l>> tilt following ax- 

from the report .if i 
assets Increased during the year from 11,311.846.14 la 
king a gain for the > 
as again;. ■ a 1899 The aarnlngs 

'ioned to Installment stock Increase, I (ron I1SJ 
1169,736.80 In 1900. In addition to this th< 
fund of $il,<48.73." A neat l)lt of commercial 
fiction occupies a few back pages in the book. It Is entitled 
Tli.- Story of Two Young Men." and may be of Interest to 
investors. 



San Francisco's invention, the commercial lunch, is 

found at its best at Fay & Foster's, in the Grand Hotel Catt, 
where they serve from 11 to 2 daily. If you have not time 
to go home at noon, drop in at Fay & Foster's. 

INSURANCE 



i 

i ' 4 4 1 






Solid 

Secure 

PROGRE9 

'•H'nuPAancMCr' 

fir ^F" "**" 


5 1 V E J 
UAL Jlj 

i,A Is 




w* 


■ --.". 


"$^* ~ aJ^JI 1 


[*^*ra3 



The PaCifiC Mutual Life Insurance Co 

of California 

Organized 1868.) Paid Policyholders. $11,000,000 

Kilgabif & Beater, General Agents Life Department 
F. W. Vooqt, General Aeent Accident Department. 

Pacific Mutual Building. S. F. 

Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital, 93,000,000 Gross Assets. 812,808,395 

Surplus to Policy-holders, S7.631.926 
H, L. Rofp, General Agent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal- 
The Hove has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of Ger- 
ebal and Special Agents resident in the Pacific Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of Its agents and the Insur- 
ing public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pay- 
ment of Losses 

New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of New York 

405 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal, 

Edmund F, Geeen, Manager. Jesse "W. Lilienthal, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability, Accident, Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Phenix Insurance Gompany of Brooklyn, n.y. 

415 MONTGOMERY ST., S, P. 

Capital $1,000,000 

Surplus 2.520,708 

Assets 5,816,560 

GEO. T. WELLINGTON, State Aeent for California, Oregon, and 
Washington. 



Pacific Coast Underwriting Co. 

Main Office— 507-508-509 Parrott Building-. San Francisco. 
Companies Incorporated. Bond furnished to guarantee stocks. Oil lands 
and mining properties for sale or lease. 

E. D. CORING, President. 

W. B. BURROWS. Secretary. 

J. E. PIRMSTONE, Auditor. 



HRC, MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 

PALATINE 

lN9trRANCE COMPANY (Limited) OF MANCHESTER ENGLAND 

SOLID SECURITY OVER $9,000,000 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON, Manager. 439 California street. 8. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Insu 



Founded A. D. 1792 



ranee Company 



of North A 



menca 



OP PHILADELPHIA, PENT?. 

Paid-up Capital 83,000.000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 85 022.016 

JAMES P. BAILEY. General Agent. 412 California street, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up, 83,446.100 Assets. 824.034.110.85 

Surplus to Policy Holders, 89,612.455.96 

PRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Gompany 

op New Zealand 
Capital, $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER & HEWITT. General Agents 



413 California street, S. F. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Go. 

OP HARTFORD 

Cash Capital 81.000,000.00 

Cash Assets 8.869,451.75 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,068,839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital ..$6,700,000 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE! & CO., Agents 816 California street, S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital, 82,250,000 Assets, $10,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO.. General Manage 
Pa cific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street. 8. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 

N. SCHLESINQER, City Agent, 304 Montgomery street, San Francisco 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 




Stolen From Thieves. 

Old Aunt Dinah had not been long in town or in service 
as cook. One evening vanila and pistache ice cream had 
been ordered for dinner, but when it made its appearance 
at table it was minus the pistache. Her mistress asked how 
it happened. " 'Clar to goodness, missie, it war kind o' 
mouldy; must have bin a long time in de tin pail; so I just 
scraped it off." 

"Did you trump my ace, my dear?" asked Mr. Meekton, 
who was his wife's partner at whist. "I did," she rejoined 
sternly; "what of it?" "I merely inquired to relieve my 
mind," he answered, with a gentle smile. "It is a great 
comfort to know you trumped it. If any one else had 
trumped it, you know, we should have lost the trick." 

Wife — "Alfred, do look at that lovely hat! How I should 
like it! I know it would make me look at least ten years 
younger." Husband — "Then I couldn't buy it for you, my 
dear, because you would look altogether young to be my 
wife." 

Gus de Smythe — "Those new boots of yours squeak aw- 
fully; perhaps they ain't paid for yet." Johnny — "That's 
all nonsense. If there is anything in that, why don't my 
coat and vest and my trousers and my hat squeak, too?" 

Professor — "You wish your daughter to take lessons on 
the piano. Has she any aptitude for it?" Proud Mamma — 
"Wonderful talent, sir; there are very few operators who 
can equal her speed on the typewriter." 

Book Reviewer — "I don't know just what to say about this 
new fiction writer." Magazine Editor — "Well, goodness! 
don't come to me for help. Say he reminds you a little of 
Gertrude Atherton and a little of George Eliot." 

"That duck you just bought is tender." "Why, how can 
you tell?" "By the man's manner, whether he is polite or 
rude. Now, he treated you very curtly; ergo, the duck is 
all right. ' 

She (coldly) — "Our engagement, sir, is at an end. I shall 
return everything you have ever given me." He — (cheer- 
fully) — "Thanks, dear; you may begin at once with the 
kisses." 

"So you let your leading man go?" "I had to," answered 
Mr. Stormington Barnes; "he was too realistic in his ideas." 
"Interfered with your work on the stage?" "No, not on the 
slage; in the box office. He wanted real money." 

Miss Lulu Finnegan — "I will give yez me answer in a 
month, Pat." He — That's right, me darlint; tek plenty av 
time to think it over. But tell me wan thing now — will it 
be yes or no?" 

Ethel — "Count Grafterino, who is engaged to Maud Gotros, 
seems to be a very fragile-looK.ng man." Thomas — "Yes, 
they say the slightest 'touch' woui_ break him." 



BANKING 



Spaulding's Carpet-Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama 

street, are the undefeated champions of the coast in their 
own especial line of work. Do not be afraid of sending them 
ycur most -elicate Moquettes or Axminsters, as they have 
mastered the art of getting the dust out of things without 
injuring the fabric. 



G. H. Mumm & Co.'s champagne has attained its pres- 
ent reputation through the support of thousands of famous 
epicures, who vote its flavor unequaled. Mumm's champagne 
is found in every clubhouse and cafe of repute at home as 
well as abroad. 



Camelline is made to wear on the human skin, to 

soften and to beautify it. We can name a thousand famous 
beauties who indorse it, among them Ellen Terry and 
Adelina Patti. 



"Cock o' the North" whisky is another good thing that 

comes from Scotland, though it is a universal drink. 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. 112.000,000 Surplus, 81,000,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profils. October 1. 1000. 83.5] L0&8.82. 

WILLIAM ALVORD President! CHARLES K. BISHOP. Vlce-Pius't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. PRENTISS SMITH Ass't Cashier I I. F. MOULTON 2d Ass'l Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.: the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shau-mut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 
Virginia City. Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies— Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit issued available in ail parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET. S. F. 

Deposits July 1. 1900. fc6.952.675 Reserve Fund 8218.593 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 439.608 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen, Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barth. E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m„ and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits oidy, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo X Go. Bank 

N. E. Cor. Sansome and Sotteb Stb. 
JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KING. Manager F. L. LLPMAN, Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER. Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

Branches— New York City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier; Salt Lake City. J. E. 

Dooly, Cashier: Portland. Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Chrlsteson, Oliver Eld ridge, 

Henry E. Huntington, Homer S. Klnc. George E. Gray. John J. McCook, 

John Berniingbam. Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny. Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000.000. Paid Up Capital 8300.000 

James D. Phelas, President S. G. Mdbpht, Vice-President 

George A. Story, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan. S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy. Chas. S. Neal. James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

DeposlU may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo &. Co., or Exchanee on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82,238,372.45 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000.000 00 

Deposits June 30. 1900 .28, 938.395.1 2 

BOARD OF DntECTORS— President, B. A. Becker: First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer: Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier, A. H. R 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann ; Secretary, George Tourny 
Ass-stant Secretary, A. H. Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodiellow. 

[-I,. SMnhart, E. Ruhte H. B. Russ, N Ohlandt. John Lloyd, and I. N 
Walter. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capital. .81 0,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund... 8210.000 
Paid-in-Capital 1.500.000 Mouthly Income, over 100,000 

It<3 Purpose is to help Its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 percent. Interest on their slock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office— 222 Sansome St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm, Corbin, Secretary and General Manager 

Crocker-Woolworth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market. Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital 81.000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kline, Cashier 

W. E. Brown, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr., Assistant CashWr 

Directors— W. H. Crocker. E. B. Pond. W. E Brown. O. E.Green, G W. 
Kline HenryJ. Crocker, G. W. Soott. 



January 5. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 




ULTIMA THULE. 

15 l\ Olbl-.n. In P.ll Mull Mwuinc. 

Over the rollinc ocean*! rim. 

Away I. .'low th« Ufa 
Where, fathoms deep, the ghoal-flsh swim 
And the tiger-shark, gray, gaunl and Krlm. 

Masks with the pilots nine, 
We know of an Island, you and I. 
Like a gossamer cloud in a summer sky. 
Where the dreams of faery do not die, 

And the isle i syours and mine. 

Girt with a strip of silver sand 

And a filigree fringe of brine 
Is a land where the virgin lilies stand. 
Like a choir of vestals, hand In hand. 

Clad all in jessamine; 
Where the roses riot o'er pastures broad. 
And the violets cluster on scented sward. 
And the kingly bee and butterfly lord 

Sit throned on the fragrant vino! 

Do you forget the Isle of Fays? 

You were a princess and I a knight; 
I won your side by dangerous ways 
And kissed your eyes till you woke in amaze 

To the dawn of a new delight. 
Right royal were you on your canopied throne. 
In white and purple, with golden zone, 
And we ruled a land that was all our own 

The space of a summer night. 

Over the edge of the outer sea. 

Long leagues below the Line, 
Is the land where the frightened fairies flee, 
-he goal of our dreamy Odyssey — 

A land that is yours and mine! 
An island mottled with green and gold. 
Ruled by a princess seven years old, 
And warded well by a warrior bold, 

A knight of summers nine. 



A STROLLING SINGER. 
(Charlotte Becker, in Ainslee's MnKnzine.) 

He sang along the woodland paths, 
When all the world was warm and gay; 

The birds half mocked him overhead, 
The shadows cooled his greenlit way. 

The earth was sweet with growing things, 
The vintage promised full and fair; 

And one with eyes like larkspur buds, 
And garnered sunshine in her hair. 

Stood watching by the ilex trees, 
A glow, a welcome in her eyes. 
He sank, too tired, at her feet 
And smiled througn wistful little sighs. 

"Dear love," he said, "I cannot live; 
I shall not see the morrow's sun. 
But I am fortunate to die 
While yet my loving is not done. 

"And weep no foolish tears for me, 
But when the vines with gold are hung- 
Think, 'Life was very good to him. 
For he had nved, and loved, and sung.' " 



THE VINTAGE. 



(Arthur Ketchnm, in Ainslee's Magazine.) 
Love brewed me a drink in the cup of Life 

At the tavern of the years. 
Love bade me drink to the dregs thereof, 
And, oh! I found that the brew of Love 

Was but the wine of tears ! 



BANKING 



London and San Francisco Bank, i 

■ - ul-fne, 



trrioR ! 

»l Aulh 



r'ratiri.fsi; ftinrlv-I H« I 

i Howard - i rmdon; Kor* 

nmu I*. HHrot]', grin 

faspMtov <>i Br-mc h f. Qtwtai i 

\««Mil« ill NVir Y"rk. Mi»«r«. J. I*. M ■ 

BRAKf III*'-; Portland, i .m«. WMhlntUAti 

Let4«n ••! trc-iu i-«ncil kwallitbla far timralcn mnl the pom ha«e ■ ■( mi r • 

rlmiirfUc tn any city of the World Pent hi foreign and dOW H HUfl rxchnnre 
kOOOOntt <-f 1-finnlry hmikn rri-ch »■<!. Ten mi on ftpplloftllOfl. 

W. Mackibto -h 

Bank of British Columbia 

8. R. cor. Bush and Sansome St*. Incorporated by Royal Charier, 1882, 

HKAD OFFICE: GO Ix>mrari> St.. 1-ondow. 

Capital Paid Up. t3.000.000. Reserve Fund, 1500.000 

BRANCH F.S--VUt.. Ha. Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloop*. Nanl- 
mil". Nelnon Rowdaud, Haudon, British Coltimhla; Portland. Oregon. 

This bank transacts a general banking business. Accounts openci] niih- 
jeet to check, and special deposits received. Commercial credits granted 
available In nil parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advance** 
made on (rood collateral security. Draws direct at current rales upon ft" 
head office and branches, and upon Its agents, an follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada: Chicago— First National Bank: 
Liverpool — North and South Wales Bank; Scotland — British Linen Com- 
pany: Ireland— Bank of Ireland: Mexico — London Bank of Mexico: Sonn 
America— London Bank of Mexico and South America: China and Japan— ■ 
Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China; Australia and New Zea- 
land — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
Ld.; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other banking 
business. Terms upon application. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 82,500.000 Paid-Up Capital. 82.000.000 

Reserve Fund. $925,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street. London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 

Limited, No. 10 Wall street. N. Y.: Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie. 17 

Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 

Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. C. ALTSCHT7L, Managers. 
R. ALTSCHUL. Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco 
Jab. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, $500,000 

DIRECTORS— James K. Wilson. Wm, J. Dulton. Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia—Droxel &Co.: Chicago-- Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City—First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Parls—Morean, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital. 91,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, $375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and sayings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Board of Directors— Ernst A. Denicke, F. Kronenberg, J. C. Rued. F. 
C. Siebe. Albert G. Wieland. H. P. Sonntag. John Rapp. H. Brunner. 

Officers— Ernst A. Denicke, President; F. Kronenberg, vice-president; H. 
Brunner. Ca shier 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

..$1,500,(100 
700.0C0 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues tetters of credltavallable throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. L1TJENTHAL, Managers. 



Capital Authorized $6,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 



Paid Up.. 
Reserve Fund.. 



Security Savings Bank 



Interest paid on deposits. 



William Alvord 
William Baboock 

Adam Grant 



222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

Loans made. 

DIRECTORS. 

S. I* Abbot, Jr. H. H. Hewlett 

O. D. Baldwin E. J. McCutchen 

W. S. Jones R. H. Pease 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 



TJhe Tfearest "Uhing. 



On the white buildings that consti- 
tuted the quarters of the Universe 
Telegraph Compan- s station at Ma- 
renzoa, the tropical sun was blazing 
down. It was called Marenzoa. though 
as a matter of fact, a distance of 
three miles separated it from the 
little Portuguese town inland, from 
which the station look its name. 

In the dim light of the living room 
were two young men. One was stret- 
ched full length on a sofa; his eyes 
were closed. The other reclined in 
a basket chair, his feet propped up on 
a stool. A bottle of spirits stood on a 
table close by. He stretched forward 
a shaking hand, and poured out a 
half tumblerful. 

Brickenden, the man on the sofa, 
opened his eyes. He shivered slightly. 

"Thank heaven, I'm through with 
this week's dose!" he exclaimed. 
"What a first-class all-around joy is 
intermittent fever!" Then his eyes 
fell on his companion, who was in 
the act of raising his glass to his 
lips. "Here, go easy, Stavvy!" he 
cried. "That's the third since lunch, 
and it don't do in a sweet, lovable 
climate like this. You'll have to stop 
it, old son, else — well, it is equiva- 
lent to going out by your own hand, 
that's all!" 

Stavert gulped down half the brandy. 
He was a young man of about twenty- 
three, with strikingly handsome fea- 
tures. Fever and hard drinking, how- 
ever, had told their tale, and the eyes 
were sunken and red-rimmed, the 
cheeks holl ved, the face haggard and 
worn. 

"There doesn't seem to be any par- 
ticular drawback to going out by my 
own hand at present!" he remarked. 
"No, I'm durned if there does!" he 
added thoughtfully. 

Brickenden raised himself on the 
sofa, and looked across at his friend. 

"I admit Marenzoa is a bit 'nervy' 
at times, and about the worst of the 
stations!" he said, slowly. "But it 
wouldn't tot up to your present condi- 
tion, all by its sweet self" He 

paused. "I suppose there are a few 
other things, among them the usual 
thing. And the bits didn't fit in nicely, 
eh?" 

Stavert tossed down the remaining 
brandy. 

"It was impossible in any case!" 
he said jerkily. Then he broke into 
a harsh laugh. "I've never told you 
my little story, have I, Brick? I don't 
make a habit of doing it, you know." 

He got up from his seat shakily, 
and leaned against the edge of the 
table. Brickenden watched him from 
the corner of his eye, but said noth- 
ing. 

"It's quite like a two-penny novel- 
ette," began Stavart, rolling a cigar- 
ette meditatively. "My mother made 
a run-away match with a poor devil 
of an artist. She was a woman of 
title and belonged to a noble family, 
who promptly disowned her for dar- 




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ing to marry the man she loved. She 
was absolutely cut off: her name was 
never to be mentioned again in the 
family. The artist, my father, worked 
hard, and managed to keep her in 
modest but comfortable circumstances. 
They loved one another, and I don't 
think she ever regretted the step 
she had taken." Stavert paused. "Then 
when I was about fifteen, I found my- 
self an orphan, with an odd hundred 
pounds to my name. My great idea 
had been the navy, and a friend wrote 
to my uncle, who was a lord of the ad- 
miralty, to know if he would help 
me. The dear gentleman replied that, 
as he refused to recognize his 
sister, so he must refuse to recognize 
her son. Then some one suggested 
the U. T. C. service, and put me in 
the way of going through the course." 
"But," interposed Brickenden, 
"what about the impossible thing — 
the incident which has caused you 
to adopt drinking brandy neat as your 
favorite recreation?" 

Stavert wetted his dry lips. 

"After putting in my five years at 
Calcut Point, I went home. I had a 
pretty good time knocking around. In 
the midst of it, I went to Cowes for 
the regatta week. I ran against some 
decent people who invited me on their 
yacht. He paused. "And there — I 
met her!" 

"It was my father's case over again, 
but without his means to carry it to 
an issue. She was clean above me in 
station. She loved me and I loved 
her. It was a mad time!" He sighed 
softly at the recollection. Then he 
jerked his head back and laughed bit- 
terly. 

"And as I was getting eight pounds 
a month for working a cable end in a 
foreign hole, and not good for any- 
thing else — good God, it was utterly 
impossible! — so I just told her what 
had to be, and went. They appointed 
me to Marenzoa, and here I've been 
for six months, cursing my luck! I 
can't forget her! Every day, every 
hour, every minute, she is in my 
thoughts! I can't have her, I never 
can! So that's why I don't particu- 
larly care whether I go out or not!" 
he finished abruptly. 

Brickenden had risen from his 
seat, and crushed a wide straw 
hat on his head. He made no com- 
ment on the story, but merely glanced 
at his watch. 

"My turn on; so long, old son!" he 
said, laconically, as he strolled away. 

"Poor old Stavvy!" he murmured. 
"He's jumpy! A little more drink, 
another touch of fever, a little more 
thinking about that girl, and he'll 
come one of the nastiest kinds of 
croppers. I must devote some atten- 
tion to him." 

Presently Rennick, the senior, poked 



his head into the room in which Stav- 
ert was sitting. 

"The Turbulent has just anchored 
off the point!" he announced. "And 
I've signaled 'em to come up. So we'll 
be having a bit of a spree to-night! 
I'm off to stir up that black-faced, lo- 
tus eating devil of a cook!" And he 
vanished. 

Another couple of hours and a 
batch of the younger officers of K.M.S. 
Turbulent invaded the quarters. They 
had been there before, and their arri- 
val was always welcomed by the U. T. 
C. men. As the night drew on they 
gathered around the vinkly station 
piano, and made merry over songs 
that were comic in name and noisy 
in chorus. 

Early in the evening Stavert had 
made a discovery. There was a new- 



Dunlop Pneumatic Tires 

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The American Dunlop Tire Co., 






Though 
New En- 
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name, it is na- 
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the fallacy of the necessity 
for foreign study 10 make a 
finished musician or elocutionist. 
GEORGE W. CHADWICK.Muj. Dlrec. 
All particulars and Catalogue will he sen! liy 
FRANK W. HALE, C. l ti Man , Boston, Miss, 



EVERY WOMAN 



Is interested and should know 
about the wonderful 

Marvel Whirling Spray 

the new Vaginal Syringe 

injection and suction. 

The hest, safest and 

most convenient. 

It cleanses 
instantly. 

If your druggist cannot "" 
supply the MARVEL, 
accept no other, but write 
us for illustrated book, sent f 
—sealed. It gives price by mail, 
particulars and directions invalu- 
able to ladies. 

MARVEL CO. 
Room 21, Times Building, • New York 




January 5, 1901. 

' I ^ HI. plague of lamps is 
the breaking of chim- 
neys ; but that can be avoided. 
Get Macbeth's "pearl top" 
or " pearl glass." 

The funnel shaped tops are 
beaded or " pearled " — a 
trade-mark. Cylinder 
are etched in the glass — 

'MACRETH PEARL GLA^-S " — 

another trade-mark. 

Our " Index " describes a// lamps and ihdr 
fpf chimr'v-. We.h it you can always order 
the ri;ht me atid shape of chimney lor any lamp. 
We mail it KK r V to any one who writes for it. 



Ads%WM 



MaCPRTH. Pittsburgh. Pft. 



comer, a lieutenant who hart lately 
joined the ship. The midshipmen re- 
ferred to him as the " 'Onerable 'Er- 
lirit." His proper name was the Hon. 
Herbert Haylesden, and he was a 
grave-looking young man with a some- 
what pompous manner. Stavert had 
been introduced, and though they had 
never "met" before, he at ence recog- 
nized him. The 'Onorable 'Erbert 
glanced curiously at him, they shook 
hands rather stiffly and turned away. 
After this incident Stavert resumed 
his drinking, and attempted, but with 
ill-success, to throw himself into the 
gaiety of the evening. Presently he 
rose from his seat. It was time for 
him to go on duty. He said good-night 
to the party at the piar j. 

"See you to-morrow, old chap!" they 
chorused. "You're coming on board 
you know." 

He made his way out .uto the night. 
The red eyes gleamed with a sudden 
passion. 

"He knew me! My own cousin, yet 
I'm only the 'U. T. C. man' to him, a 
casual acquaintance he can't escape 
from meeting. Curse him!" 

He stumbled along the little path 
that led to the operating room and 
relieved Brickenden, who had been 
eagerly waiting for him. 

For the first hour he was kept pretty 
busy at the instruments. There had 
been a block on one of the south- 
ern cables, and Port John messages 
were coming over their line. With 
his head burning, his throat parched, 
he worked mechanically. He was 
transmitting a message, when a name 
in it caused him to start. It was to 
a firm of Port John lawyers, and it 
ran: "Inform Lieutenant Haylesden 
sudden death of father; must return 
home immediately." 

He sent the message along, then 
sank back in nis chair, his brain a- 
whirl. Lord Haylesden was dead, and 
his only son, now smoking placidly in 
the quarters not a hundred yards 
away, would reign in his stead. Sta- 
vert ground his teeth. To think that 
this man should have everything while 

he And now he came lo think of 

it, this young lieutenant was the only 
man between him and the title. If 
he had died, Dick Stavert, the tele- 
graph operator, would have stepped 
into it all — would have been able 

to marry the one woman who ! 

He pressed his hand to his forehead. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



HI* hr-aii tu ili- 
lilootl thai 

If ho died now' The mad , 

upon him. He turnc d awajr with a 

shudder and t ri • I lu 

and ■! irnlng like 

li"l I bit. k Im 

the qiiart<" i the room. he 

pulled a hie leather trunk from lis 
ami rummnK'''l feverishly 
among Ita content*. Finally he pulled 
OUl a liny class bottle. In it was about 
[spoonful of colorless liquid. He 
held it up and gaied nt It with a wild 
bulk. 

It would be Bate — absolutely safe!" 
be muttered hoam 

• • • • • 

The Turbulent, resplendent in her 
white awnings and gleaming decks, 
was lying motionless on the calm 
sea. In the smoking room a small 
group of officers were chatting and 
laughing. Together, on one side of 
the table, sat Uriekeuilen and Stavert 
— the latter opposite Lieutenant Hay- 
lesden. who at that moment was sip- 
ping a glass of whisky. 

"The gig's coming in!" cried one 
of the officers, glancing out of the 
pert hole. Haylesden put down his 
whisky and jumped up. 

"Shan't be a minute." he said, hur- 
rying away on deck. Then one of the 
officers noted something curious about 
the boat and commented on it. They 
all stood up and crowded around the 
port hole, Brickenden with them. 

Stavert did not move. He shot a 
glance at their backs. A look of cun- 
ning crept into his face, and his eyes 
glittered. The next moment his hand 
had slipped to his pocket, and with- 
drawn something. With his eye still 
on the backs, his hand passed swiftly 
over Haylesden's glass, and a tiny 
stream poured into it. Then his hand 
went back to his pocket, and he rose 
to his feet, and watched with the 
others. His hands were clenched so 
that the nails dug into the flesh. 

They reseated themselves, and re- 
sumed their talk. Stavert felt his 
eyes irresistibly drawn to the deadly 
glass in front of him. He shuddered 
convulsively. With a superhuman ef- 
fort he turned away and joined in the 
conversation, talking in a high-pit- 
ched tone and laughing. Brickenden 
gazed at him in wonder. 

There was a sudden crash on the 
deck above their heads. Some of the 
officers jumped to their feet. 

Then a midshipman came clatter- 
ing down to them. He thrust a white 
face into the smoking room. 

"An accident,'" he gasped. "They 
had swung the gig in, when the tackle 
gave way, and she fell lrom the bow; 



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' futon, write*: "We kno*. Dr 
Mllri to be ■ most skillful »-i»eciftllr>i." The lite 
Prof. J. 8. Jewell, M.D* editor of the "Journal 
• if Nirv-.n-i DlHgm," Mjri: "My nil in can « 
pu..lt«.h your surprising results." 

Bend i<T 1000 References to Blahopg, Clergy- 
men, Mayors. Parmer*, mid their wive*. < "npy* 
rightod Examination Mlank *>r < h«rt. pamphlets 
And Special Individual Treatment Free. Twcnty- 
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BUSWELL CO. 



Bookbinder, patier-ruler, printer 
and Blank-Book Manufacturer 



53« Clav Street. 



the keel caught Haylesden on the back 
of the head — killed him!" finished the 
youngster in a tone of awe. The offi- 
cers raced away. The two U. T. C. 
men remained alone. 

"Great Scott! What's the matter 
Stavvy!" cried Brickenden suddenly. 

Stavert's eyes were fastened on a 
glass standing on the table before 
him. His jaw had dropped, and he 
was trembling. Then with a quick 
movement he picked up the glass and 
staggering to the port hole tossed the 
contents into the sea. 

He tumbled back into a chair, gaz- 
ing stupidly at Brickenden. Then the 
full force of the thing he had been 
saved from broke upon him. A gleam 
came into the red eyes, and the words 
came out with a wild rush. 

"I'm going home, Brick — going to 
'marry her — cut the drink — run 
straight forever!" he cried incoher- 
ently. "I'm Lord Haylesden, Brick — 
Lord Haylesden, my God, I am!" 

Brickenden looked at him pityingly. 
Stavert had come his "cropper" then 
— drink and the fever had turned his 
brain. 

He was wrong, however, for in the 
course of time he found these things 
actually come to pass, and he wonder- 
ed exceedingly. 

But it had been the nearest thing. 
— Gilbert Dale, in London M. A. P. 




Scotch Whiskey. 
Distilled by Royal 
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■A 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 5, 1901. 



Southern Pacific Co.--Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANOI8CO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market S&reet] 



leave] 



From January 1, 1901 



[ARRIVE 



7:3f) A Benicla.Sulsun, Elmira. Vacaville, RumBey, and Sacramento.. 7:45 P 

7:30a Davis. Woodland. Knights Landing. MarysviUe. Oroville 7:45 p 

7:30 a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East - «■ l-=}5 ** 

8:00a Marlinez, San Ramon. Vallejo. Napa. Callstoga, Santa Rosa..... 6:15 p 

8:00 a NUes. Livermore, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton : , ;* lr y;;' ' :15 p 

8:30 A Shasta Express— Davis. Williams \for Bartlett Springs), Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland ■■■■■ "»5 p 

8:30 A San JoBe. Livermore. Stockton, lone. Sacramento, Placerville, 

MarysviUe. Chlco. Red Bluff. 4:15 p 

8:30 a Oakdrde. t'hinese, Sonora, Carters 4:15 P 

9:00 A Haywards, Niles. and way stations •■ 11:45 A 

9:00 a Los Angeles Expre-s— Martinez. Tracy. Lathrop. Stockton, 

Merced. Fresno, and Los Angeles J : J5 P 

9:30 a Vaiiejo. Martinez, and way stations 5:45 P 

lti:00 a The Overland Limited— Ogden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago .. 6:45 P 
11:00 a Nlles. Stockton, Sacramento. Mendota. Fresno, Hanford. 

Vlsalla Porterville 4:15 P 

11:00 A Livermore. Sanger, Goshen Junction. Bakersfield, Los 

Angeles 4 K j« 

tl:00 P Sacramento River steamers F : « A 

3:00 P Haywards.Niles. and way stations 5:45 p 

4:00 p Martinez. San Ramon. Vallejo. Napa. Callstoga, Santa Rosa 9:15 A 

4:00 p Benlcla, Winters. Sacramento, Woodland. Knight'B Landing 

MarysviUe, Oroville +L :4 ?r A 

1:30 p Haywards.Niles and San Jose „ T8:45 a 

5:00 p Ntles, Livermore. Stockton. Lodi 10:4--> a 

ff5:00 v Sunse t Limited. El P*so, New Orleans and East CI0:15 a 

5:00 p The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno. Bakersfield, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara. Los Angeles 10:15 A 

5:00 p New Orleans Express— Bakersfield, Santa Barbara, Los An- 

gelee. Doming, El Paso, New Orleans, and East 7:45 A 

6.00 p Hayward*, Niles, and San Jose 7:45 a 

t6:0u p Vallejo .-• }} : ? 5 A 

6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ogden, Cheyenne, Omaha. Chicago 12:15 p 

6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ocden. Denver. Omaha. Chicago 4:15 P 

7:00 P Oregon and California Express, Sacramento. MarysviUe. Red- 
ding. Portland Puget Sound and East 8:45 a 

8:05 p San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez and way stations 11:4V A 

t8:05P Vallejo ■■- 7: 5 '' 



Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

8:15 a Newark, Centervllle. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way Btationa 6:20 P 

t2:15p Newark, Centerville. San Jose. New Almaden. Felton. Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations T10:50 a 

4:15 p Newark. San Jobc Los Gatos 8:50 A 

09: 3Qp Hunters' Excursion. San Jose, and Way Stat'ons 17:20 p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15. 9:00, and 11:00 
A.m. 1:00.3:00. 5:00. P.M. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.-t6:00. J8:00. ts.05. 10:00 A. w. 12:00. 

2:00. 4:00, °5:15 P.M. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (T hird and Townsend streets). 

t6:10A Ocean View. South San Francisco t6:30 P 

7:00 a San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) 1:30 p 

9:00a San Jose. TresPinos. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove. PasoRobles, 

San Luis Obispo. Surf, Lompoc. and principal way stations 4:10 p 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations 6:35 A 

11:30a San Jose and way stations 5:30 p 

t2:45 P San Mateo. Redwood, Menlo Park. Palo Alto. Santa Clara, San 
Jose, Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz. Salinas. Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove tl<>:36 A 

„:30p San Jose and Way Stations ":30 p 

4:15p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 9:45 A 

5:00p SanJose. Los Gatos, and Principal Way Stations T9:00 a 

6t30p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 8:35 a 

6:30 p San Jose and Way Stations T8:00 a 

an :45 p San Jose and Way Stations 7:30 p 

A for Morning, p for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted. 

tSundavsonlv. 9 Mondays. Wednesdays. Fridays. 

c Tuesdays. Thursdays, Sundays. a Saturdays only. 



The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time CirJ* andother 
i nf ormation . 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 




Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf, San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports, 11 A. M.: January 1. C. 11,16. 21. 
26. 31. Feb. 5. chance to company's steamers at Seattle. 

ForB. C and Puget Sound Ports, 11 A. m,. Jan. 1,6. 11 
10. 21,26. 31. Feb. 5. and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 P. M.. Jan. 3, 8, 13, 18, 
23, 28, Feb. 2. and every fifth day thereafter. 
For San Diego, stopping only at SantaBarbara, Port 
Los Angeles. Redondo, (Los Angeles). "Queen." Wednesdays, 9. a. m., 
Santa Rosa. Sundays. 9 a. m. 

For Santa Cruz. Monterey. San Simeon. Cayucos. Port Harford, San 
Luis Obispo. Gariota. Santa Barbara. Ventura, Hueneme. San Pedro, Ea^t 
San Pedro, and Newport (Los Angeles), " Corona." Fridays. 9 a. m.; 
"Bonlta." Tuesdays, 9 a. m. 

For Mexican ports, 10 a w., 7th of each month. 
For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice. 
TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
GOO0ALL, PERKINS & CO.. Gen.Agts.. lOMarket St.. San FranclBco. 

7:20 A. M. LOCAL FOR FRESNO. BAKERSFIELD 
and intermediate points. 9 A. M. California Limited, 
with Sleepers. Dining and Observation Cars to Kansas 
City and Chicago. 1:20 p.m. Local for Stockton. 8 p.m. 
Overland Express, with Palace and Tourist Sleepers and 
Choir Cars San Francisco to Chicago. 



Santa Fc 
Route 



Brushes 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 
tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners, 
dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
era, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men. tar- 
roofers, tanners, tallers. etc. 



Buchanan Bros., 

Brush Manufacturers. 609 Sacramento street. San Francisco. Tel. 5610 

THE UNION PACIFIC 

The Pioneer Overland Route. The only DIRECT LINE to and 
from the East. Sbortes-t line, ijuickest time. 

The Overland Limited 

Run*' pv«>ry day in the year. Leaves San Francisco rlailv at 10 \. K. 
Double Dining-Koom. Palace Sleepers, Dining ("ars, Meals a la 
Carte. Equipped with Pinicb Light and Steam Heat. No change 
of cars. Hnffet Smoking and Library Cars, with Barber Shop and 
Pleasant Reading Rooms. Broad Vestibuled Throughout. 

D. W. HITCHCOCK, General Agent. 
No. 1 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibueon Fkeet— Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30.9:00, 11:00 a.m: 12:35. 3:30. 5:10. 6:80 p. m. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 P.M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11 :30 p. m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00. 9:30. 11:00 a. m.; 1:30, 3:30. 5.-00. 6:20 p. m. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10.7:50.9:20. 11:10 A. M.: 12:45. 3:40, 5:10 P. a. SiturJiyj 
Extra trips at 1:55 and 6:35 P.M. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10. 9:40, 11:10 A. M.: 1 :40, 3:40, 5:05, 6:25 p. M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco | In Effect Nov. 7, 1900 1 Arrive in San Francisco 


Week days I Sundays | Destinations | Sundays | Week days 


7:30 AH 
3:30 pm 
5:10 PH 


8 KM AM 

9:30 am 
5:00 PM 


Novato 

Petaluma 
Santa Rosa 


10:40 ah 
6;05 PH 
7:35 PM 


8:40 'am 
10:25 AM 
6:22 pm 


7:30 AM 
3:30 pm 


8:00 ah 


Fulton, Windsor. 

Healdsburg, Lytton. 

Geyservilie. Cloverdale 


7:35 pm 


1025 AM 

622 PH 


7:30 A " | 8:00 AH | H °» land - ™ ah | 7:35 PH | 622 PM 


7:30 AH | 8:00 am j Ouerneville 1 7:35 PM 1 10:25 AM 
3:30 PM 1 ! uuernewne | 6;22 pM 


7:30 AH 1 8:00 AH 1 Sonoma 1 9:15 am 1 8:40 am 
5:10 pm I 5:00 pm 1 Glen Ellen | 6:05 pm I 6:22 pm 


7;30 am 1 8:00 AM 1 Qphastonol 1 10:4 ° AM 1 10:25 AM 
3:30 pm | 5:00 pm I Sebaatopol | ?;35 pM | 6;22 pM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs; at Fulton for Altrurla: at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyservilie 
for Skaggs' Springs: at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hoplaud for Duncan 
Springs, Highland Springs. Kelsey\ille, Carlshad Springs, Soda Bay. Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs; at Uklah, for Vichy Springs. Saratoga Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Wliter Springs, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter 
Valley, John Day's, Riverside. Llerley's, Bucknell's, Hmihedrin Heights, 
Hullville. Booneville, Philo. Christine Soda Springs. Navarro, Whites- 
boro, Albion, Little River, Orr's Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg. 
Westport, Usal Willlts, Laytonville, Cumrulngs, Bell's Springs, Harris, Ol- 
sen's. Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St.. Chronicle Building. 



H. C. WHITING, Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass, Agent. 



Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m.. for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kohe(Hlogo). Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkon 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Garlic (via Honolulu) Wednesday, January 16, 1901 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday. Feb. ft, 1901 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday. March 7, 1901 

Garlic (via Honolulu) Saturday. March 30. 1901 

Round Trip Tickrts at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 

corner First. D. D. ST P BBS. General Manager. 



SS "Auptrnlia." lo Tahiti, Sunday. Jan. 6, 1 p.m. 
SS "Zcalandis." Wednesday* Jan. IB - p. no. 
SS "Sonoma," Wednesday, Jan. 23, ntop m, 
line l" CooTgardie, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRKCKF.US& BROS. 00 . 
Agent*. 643 Mnrket Street. Freight office. 327 
Market St., San Frnneisco. 




Price, ptr copy, to cent*. 




ESTABLISHED JULY JO, tSSS. 



Annual Subscription, S4.00 



News bkter 



- • 



r 



(tfuUfarnia X&tartisjcr. 




Vol. LXII. 



SAN FRANCISCO. JANUARY 12, 1901. 



Number 2. 



^MARmn^'k^-™'™;' "f™?"^ by £? Proprietor. FRED. 
MARRIOTT. 5V, Kearny street. San Francisco. Entered at 
San Francisco Postoffice as second-class matter. 

The office of the S. F. NEWS LETTER In London. Eng . Is at 
JO Cornhlll E. C. England. (George Street & Co.. RenVesenla- 
lives) where Information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising rates. Parts. France— Office No 
37 Avenue de L'Operm, 

All social Items, announcements, advertising or other matter 
l n "m2°, < ' for publication In the current number of the NEWS 
LiTTER, should be sent to tnls office not later than 6 p. m. 
Thursday. 



There evidently is not enough bad "literature" extant, 
so "Peck's Bad Boy" has bobbed up again to add a fresh hor- 
ror to the Sunday supplement. 



Cannabalism is the crowning horror In the Province of 
Shanshi, China, where the inhabitants have suffered most 
heavily from the scourge known as "civilization." 



President Benjamin Ide Wheeler of Berkeley tells us that 
Aguinaldo is dead. If the local savant is so good at riddles, 
perhaps he can explain the whereabouts of Mayor Snow's 
missing bond. 



When you see a man hurrying toward Nevada with a hand- 
satchel and a watchful expression, the question always 
arises: which law is he trying to break, that which governs 
divorce or that which restricts pugilism? 



There are no jokes this week about the Louisiana town 
clerk and sheriff who pumped chivalry at each other from 
behind telegraph poles. The jokist is silent, for well he 
knows the Southern duel has ceased to be a joke, and is fast 
becoming a public nuisance. 



If half of what Grand Councillor W. H. Savage says about 
the scaley proceedings of his Eastern brothers of the Chosen 
Friends oe true the layman is forced to the conclusion that 
the Chosen Friends have not been so careful in their selec- 
tion as the name of the order would lead us to believe. 



The Quartermaster's Department is complaining that 
Spanish laws prevail at Manila, making it most unhandy to 
land military stores. Too bad the former owners had not 
foreseen the Yankee invasion and adjusted the laws of 
the Philippines to facilitate the subjection of the island. 



The Czar has sent instructions to his troops to avoid loot- 
ing and unnecessary barbarities in China. Possibly his 
motive was a Christian one; possibly he has been told that 
the Powers had stolen everything portable and destroyed 
everything in sight, so that the orders would exercise no 
great self-restraint on the part of his soldiery. 



From the recent experiences of that energetic lady mis- 
sionary, Donaldina Cameron, in her several unsuccessful 
ventures at rescuing slave girls, it would seem that the 
principal occupation of ladies of her calling was to serve as 
a standing joke to the sharp slave dealers of Fresno and 
Mayfleld. 



Bishop Potter of New York has been congratulated on his 
tact and diplomacy in maintaining a discreet silence after 
having exposed the city's police atrocities, but the Bishop 
has spoken lately on the subject of "Municipal Degenera- 
tion," and spoiled it all and tempted us to the belief that 
loquacity is almost a universal disease among the clergy. 



Richard Le Gallienne, in writing on "The Tasks of the 
Twentieth Century." revealed plainly enough that the subject 
was as much too large for him as that of interpreting Omar's 
songs or criticising the Influence of Kipling. 



The Deakin family of San Leandro are living on raw 
meat and uncooked groceries. The Deakins'may be named 
in the same category with vegetarians and like harmless 
i ranks whose manias usually prove mercifully fatal. 



Mrs. Ferdinand Gonzales (nee Lindley) has taken her 
present name from the swart Cuban who tends door at the 
Hotel Sunderland, at a salary of $10 a month. That Mrs. 
Gonzales, who enjoys an income of $100 a month still accepts 
the hard-earned mite of Ferdinand Gonzales would lead us 
to believe that she Is taking an advantage of her husband's 
position. 



Five years ago Professor E. H. Griggs of Stanford said 
on the platform that "women who are unwilling to live their 
lives in uhe circle of their family are best fitted to be in- 
telligent mothers." To-day Professor Griggs is lecturing in 
Boston for a consideration of $30,000 a year, to say nothing 
of the soubriquet of the "Perfect Man," which he receives 
gratis from millions of the emancipated. Professor Griggs 
comes high, but the ladies must have him, for cultured 
flattery is rare and in great demand. 



New York State, always fertile in such phenomena, has 
developed a spook of a musical turn, who claims to have 
buried a large fortune under a church in San Francisco. 
Unfortunately the ghostly visitant has forgotten the name of 
the church, though it has chimes which play D flat. And now 
a number of D flats are ransacking our places of wor- 
ship, and church-going San Francisco bids fair to become 
once more a popular pastime. 



Quite a number of writers, including Richard Le Gallienne, 
are puzzling their ink-sodden brains as to whether the Trans- 
vaal was worth the gigantic war which England has waged 
for its possession. Curiously enough they all miss the point. 
The war was not fought to gain a small patch of territory in 
South Africa, but to maintain the prestige of the British Em- 
pire. The Transvaal may not have been worth the heavy 
price paid, but the Empire certainly was. 



All thanks to the obliging Senators who have proposed 
at Washington that one of the new first class battleships 
contracted for be named for the State of California. With 
all due praise to the above gentlemen and their proposition, 
was not our State worthy the honor some years before many 
of her sisters who bear their emblems proudly on the bows 
of some of our most famous fighting ships? 



Papa Zimmerman is indeed good. He has not only pro- 
vided that his new family aristocrat shall stay at home in 
considerable ease, but that he shall move about and see the 
world, charging up traveling expenses to that grateful 
spender who gave a daughter and a fortune to the pride of 
station. So Mr. and Mrs. Manchester are speeding toward 
San Francisco without a care in the world except, perhaps, 
an occasional regret that San Francisco affords no hotel 
sufficiently exclusive or expensive. Ideal marriage seldom 
occurs on earth, where new found fathers stand none too 
often above a pile of bonds, scissors in hand beside the 
hymenial sons who hold the family seal! 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 



THE GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 

Governor Henry T. Gage, following a long line of prece- 
dents, sent to the Legislature as soon as it was duly organ- 
ized his biennial message. It is not a document of extraor- 
dinary importance, yet it was the message of the Governor 
of the State and deserved to be received with more courtesy 
than it was by the law-making branch of the Government. 
It was simply "received," but not read, by the Assembly, 
and the Senate adjourned before it could arrive. Thus the 
highest official announcement of the condition and needs 
of the State became a public document without its having 
been so much as read in either house. If the Governor 
thinks that there are certain matters to which the attention 
of the Legislature should be called, the least members can 
do is to listen to what he has to say. To do that would, of 
course, take a little time, but members are paid for their 
time, and no excuse holds good on that account. There is 
some small excuse, however, for their thinking the reading 
of this last message would be a plague. Two-thirds of it are 
taken up with matters growing out of Dr. Kinyoun's reports 
of plague in this city. The Governor boldly and aggressively 
asserts that we never had a case of plague among us. Who 
knows? When doctors disagree who shall decide? It is 
enough that we know the plague in an epidemic form did 
not at any time exist in San Francisco and that if a few 
sporadic cases did occur they were confined to Chinatown. 
In view of the conditions that surrounded this port at the 
time, it behooved all our medical officers to exercise great 
vigilance; and it is a weak charge to make against the 
highest officer of them all that he was too vigilant. If he 
was, the error was on the right side. In any event, the 
Governor might have better dignified his office than by using 
it for a libelous suggestion like this: "Can it be possible," 
he asks, "that some dead body of a Chinaman had, inno- 
cently or otherwise, received a post-mortem inoculation in a 
lymphatic region by some one possessing the imported 
plague bacilli?" There are two things to be said about that. 
First, it is an admission that bacilli really was found in the 
dead body of a Chinaman, and, secondly, as the Federal 
medical officers were the only persons who at that time 
possessed "the imported plague bacilli," the charge of "inno- 
cently or otherwise" inoculating a dead body must apply 
to one or all of them. It is an astounding charge, about 
which the Governor has either said too little or too much. 
Does he really know that any such inoculation took place? 
If he does, he should have gone further and have brought 
the crime home to the miscreant who committed it. If he 
does not, be has furnished a more than sufficient excuse 
for the manner in which the message was received by the 
Legislature. Upon the flimsy, hypothetical case he imagines, 
the Governor has founded recommendations which he urges 
the Legislature to place in the statute book. Among these 
is one to prohibit the use by scientific men, for the purposes 
of study or otherwise, of any cultures or slides of any plague 
bacilli. Their doing so he desires punished as a felony. 
He further suggests that it be declared a felony for any 
person or corporation to publish or cause to be published a 
false report of the existence of plague within this State. 
Of course, if the person publishes such a report, knowing it 
to be false, he should punished. Scientific men all over the 
world procure bacilli for experimentation. Koch and the 
great Pasteur could not have made their life-saving discov- 
eries under such a law as Governor Gage wants enacted in 
this State. We are very sure Governor Gage means well in 
this connection, but he is beyond his depth. The News Let- 
ter refers to these matters now because it agrees with the 
Governor that they are of the highest Importance. Our 
nearness to Asia renders us at all times amenable to the 
incoming of contagious diseases, and it is not confidence- 
inspiring that our local authorities are all at daggers' points 
over questions concerning the health of the city and State. 



The ballots at the late election were simplicity itself. The 
voter had but to stamp the rubber cross against the names 
of the candidates he desired to vote for, and therewith his 
task ended. The number of candidates to be voted for were 
arranged together in separate sections, so that no intelligent 
man need have made a mistake under that head. A dis- 
tinguishing mark made on a ballot very properly vitiates it, 
because otherwise it would destroy that absolute secrecy 
which is the best feature of 'the Australian ballot. If a voter 
be unable to read he is entitled to the assistance of a sworn 
election officer. What further concession ignorance is 
entitled to it is hard to see. Six years ago the State gave 
an overwhelming majority to a constitutional amendment 
authorizing the Legislature to institute an educational 
qualification for voters. It was a sound and wise step to 
take and was commented upon all over the country as 
highly creditable to California. It cannot, therefore, at this 
lute date, be made an objection to the Australian ballot law 
that it takes some small modicum of intelligence to vote it. 
If it is to be amended at all it should be in the opposite 
direction. The section enabling a man who cannot read to 
vote might well be eliminated. There is no excuse in this 
State for illiteracy to that extent. The Chronicle, we regret 
to observe, is making use of the present recount difficulties 
as an excuse for subverting the Australian ballot, and ap- 
peals to the Legislature now in session to take steps to that 
end. It is bad advice. We are persuaded that no serious 
interference with the law as it at present stands will be 
tolerated by the people. The Chronicle does not say, and it 
is not in its power to say, what law could be framed to pre- 
vent fraud on the part of election officers banded together 
to commit it. Naturally enough, the present law is very 
obnoxious to the bosses as well as to all who use those 
vampires on the body politic. But that is one reason why 
honest men like it. It has done more to put a check-rein 
on bossism than all the laws that have been passed in this 
State. It is now the law of most of our States and is every- 
where approved. Proposals for its repeal are no longer 
within the domain of practical politics. 



STAND BY THE AUSTRALIAN BALLOT! 

The recent errors or frauds in counting the ballots of this 
municipality ought not to be permitted to make for the 
repeal of the very excellent ballot law under which we 
new live. False counting is possible under any other written 
law that can be framed, as it is under the existing one. As 
a matter of fact, it does not appear that it is the counting 
that is at fault, but the marking of the ballot by the '"iter. 



WOMEN AS MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

The last half of the century that has just closed was 
marked by an almost revolutionary enlargement of the 
spheres of activity in which women ot the genteel class 
may seek for occupation. In commercial pursuits, in profes- 
sional life, in the higher education of the universities, and 
in several of the mechanical trades women are now jostling 
cheek by jowl with men in a competition tuat a century ago 
would have been regarded as not merely "unladylike," but 
as an unnatural violation of the inherent law of the sexes. 
Opinions may and do differ as to whether the change has 
been beneficial either to the women who have availed them- 
selves of the wider liberty and broader field of exertion thus 
presented, or to organized society as a whole. A considera- 
tion of that general question, however, necessarily brings 
within the range of disputation moot problems, in regard 
to woman's rights and wrongs, and the sociological condi- 
tions under which humanity is organized into communities, 
which it is not within the scope of this article to engage in. 
We think, though, that the time has come when there should 
be a full, free and unprejudiced discussion of the propriety 
of permitting women to enter the medical profession. In say- 
ing this we must not be understood as implying or suggest- 
ing that the legal right of women to study, and when quali- 
fied, practice medicine, should be in any way disturbed. 
We are merely suggesting that the time has come when that 
wholesome and conscientious public sentiment which, more 
than any formal municipal law, rules the world, should 
pause and consider whether any decent woman can undergo 
the ordeals of study and training, as at present established 
within the medical profession as a prerequisite to the secure- 
ment of a diploma, without destroying the better part of 
her womanly nature, and necessarily leaving her as coarse 
and blunted in her sensibilities as a Barbary Coast bawd. 
We are merely suggesting to careful fathers and mothers 
that the time has come when they should institute inquiries 
and ascertain what influences they are subjecting their 
daughters to before they permit them to become medical 
students. Those who are seeking information upon this 
point can find a veritable mint of knowledge among the 
patients at the City and County Hospital. A calloused man 



January 12, 1901. 



SAN FRXNCISCO NEWS LETTER 



of tho world who wan twin* treated at the Hospital for a 
mom*, h cougn relates bla experience tola way: 

"ling lady or evident refinement, whoso every si 
dlcatcd that Mio bad come from a careful horn.-, and bad 
apent the nineteen year* si 

dltlona, came to me and told me that she had been 
by the professor, who also acted as visiting ,1,. 
ward, to make a study of my ailment— a physical as well aa 
an oral study. The latter she coram, m .• by asking 

a few stereotyped questions about my age and the r. 
character of my family for healthfulncss. Then ab< 
denly demanded if I had ever suffered from a cortala 
some disease, which decent women do not mention 
to each other. This question she followed by others of 
ii similar nature, until she bad exhausted the list Now, 
there was nothing in my condition or in the nature of my 
ailment to suggest these questions or to give them 
the appearance of scientific Inspiration. They were abso- 
lutely Irrelevant and In no wise materially connected with 
the case. Obviously they were asked through the sheer 
lust of carrying on with a member of the opposite sex a 
conversation in regard to a forbidden subject; and the gen- 
eral manner of the girl indicated that she was a new begin- 
ner, and that she was conscious of the Impropriety of her 
conversation, and that within her the womanly instinct 
of modesty was still struggling, though unsuccessfully. 
against another instinct of a licentious character." 

The evidence of this man is corroborated and more than 
corroborated by the almost universal testimony of all the 
patients who have ever come into clinical contact with 
the female medical student. The stories, indeed, which are 
told by some of these patients in regard to the conduct of 
the female students, is absolutely revolting. Be that as it 
may, it is clear that no girl can pass through incidents of this 
kind without having her better nature calloused and her 
cleanliness of mind destroyed. No man may touch pitch 
without being defiled, and no girl or woman can be exposed 
to influences and surroundings that must necessarily blunt 
those delicate instincts which are the outgrowth of a guard- 
ed and refined home life wihout losing that which is her 
grandest attribute. 



NEWSPAPERS BY A PROGRESSIVE MAN. 
Mr. Alfred Harmsworth, editor and proprietor of the Lon- 
don Daily Mail, has been trying to show the people of New 
\ork what the newspaper ought to be, by taking control of 
the World for a single day, and bringing out a number 
changed to meet his present ideals. There is nothing very 
striking or new in the reformed sheet, except its altered 
make up. It is much reduced in size, but its pages are corre- 
spondingly increased. There is just as much matter in it 
as before, but its broad and somewhat unwieldly pages made 
narrower and shorter. For convenience in reading in cars 
and railroads, and for carrying in the pocket, the change is 
an improvement. The news is better arranged, more con- 
densed, and given space more proportioned to the importance 
of the subjects than is at present common with our so- 
called great dailies. To this extent it is a betterment of 
the average newspaper. It is not an ideal publication by 
any means. But t-hat is not the fault of Mr. Harmsworth. 
He had charge for only one day, and had to take things as 
he found them, and not as he would have made them. The 
staff was not in sympathy with him, and rather ridiculed 
his efforts than aided them. Much of their writing is be- 
neath contempt. Mr. Harmsworth is plainly not satisfied, 
for that we take to be the motive of an interesting article 
he has contributed to the North American Review for Janu- 
ary, advanced sheets of which are to hand. It is entitled the 
"Simultaneous Newspaper of the Twentieth Century." He 
finds much to criticise in the present condition of the press. 
He thinks it has lost much of its influence over public opin- 
ion, that its political leaders are lacking in both experience 
and ability, and that much of the intelligence printed and 
illustrated conspicuously, is of the most, trivial interest. 
In the future, however, he thinks that large developments 
are to be expected. He sees the time coming when, through 
the organization of vast newspaper trusts, one or two great 
newspapers, with publication offices in all the large centers 
of population, will supply the necessities of the public in 
both this country and in England. That may be. As a mat- 



newspaper ImslQeaa In the United Stale* 

■ In that direction already. With tho 

•upanl.-s and the Asso- 

«. aa It now exists, no man can afford to start s 

n the Asm ■ dla- 

■ ~. an.l h. OOOM not Bff.ir.l. by h;i to pay the 
r-ttos for telegraphic news Thi .itlng 
formlty anionu the dallies that n.v.r existed I 

■ i as to their little petty local Jealousies, they all ahare 
noughts molded for than by the Asso. i 

managers. The people of the country are only told what the 

organization wants them to know. That there will 

. omblnntions wPl only be keeping with 

■ ml of the limes. That It will subserve public interests 
we do not believe. Publishing should be as free aa think- 
ing, and the printing press will become a curse Instead of a 
blessing, unless It is. 



AS TO OUR EXPORTS OF COAL. 

If England be in the dire straits for coal that the Chronicle 
60 industriously labors to have it appear, how comes it that 
she continues to export coal to all the world? She sends 
many cargoes of it yearly around the Horn to California, 
because our manufactories must have it. She sends us still 
more cargoes annually from her Australian possessions, 
and has done so from our discovery of gold until now, and 
withal she shows no sign of wearying of our trade. 
Our large foundries could not get along without a certain 
percentage of Welsh coal, and ill would betide the steam- 
ship builder who should have to make his trial trips 
withany other kind. The Scotts can certify to that, and so 
i an the Government to the tune of some hundreds of thou- 
sands of dollars in premiums. Then it would go hard with 
our Trans-Pacific steamers if they had to depend solely upon 
coal mined within our own territory, which burns out bars 
on long voyages, forms clinkers, and does not produce a 
maximum of steam. In a thoughtful paper in the January 
number of the North American Review, Mr. Louis Wind- 
muller points out that "the annual exports of coal and coke 
from Great Britain amounts to 50,000,000 tons, whilst those 
from the United States during the year 1899 amounted to 
5,000,000 tons." The figures for 1900 were not made up, 
but he estimates that our export for that year increased 
3,000,000 tons, which is acounted for as partly a result of 
the coal miners' strike in England, and partly because so 
many of her Atlantic steamers were diverted to South Africa', 
and did not take half their supply from this country as they 
usually do. England's manufactures are increasing rapidly, 
and of course the home consumption of coal is keeping pace 
therewith. It may be that the time will come when England 
will not care to sell her black diamonds to all the world so 
freely, but when that time comes, her colonies around the 
world will be more than ready to take her place. It is a 
glorious thing for the United States that they have enough 
coal within their borders to meet all possible requirements 
of the home market, but we do not think they will ever sell 
much of it abroad. Freight rates do not permit of profitable 
coal exportation. In England coal is mined and delivered 
at an average of $2.50 per ton; in the United States, accord- 
ing to the authority just quoted, the cost of mining and 
handling coal is about what it sells for in England. The 
freight on cargoes we recently sent to the Mediterranean 
ports averaged from $5.00 to $5.10 per ton. It will be seen 
at once that there is no encouragement for exporters in 
these figures. If, therefore, we cannot send coal to Europe at 
a profit, it would be a bad thing for us if England could not, 
because the measure of her purchasing power is largely the 
measure of our own success. She buys more from the 
United States than does all the rest of the world. If she 
could not buy, our farmers could not sell their surplus pro- 
ducts, and in that case prices at home would fall almost out 
of sight. 



General Pearson, a prominent Boer leader, declares that 
none of the money collected in the United States for the aid 
of his countrymen has ever reached the Transvaal. Surely 
our laws provide some way of reaching the embezzling 
scoundrels who have made the Boer war an excuse to prey 
on the sympathies of the charitable. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 



THE CHINESE EXCLUSION LAW. 

Congressman Kahn has introduced a bill to continue in 
force the Geary law which expires next year. When that 
law was enacted it was thought by our benevolent friends 
of New England that we should change our opinion on the 
Chinese question within ten years, and hence the only law 
we could get passed at the time, had to be limited to that 
period. Mr. Kahn's bill proposes to extend exclusion for 
twenty years more, and he further seeks to put a few needed 
rivets into the act in order to make it more water tight. 
It is needless to say that the people of the Pacific Coast 
have not changed their opinions as to the extreme necessity 
of excluding the Chinese from our local labor markets. 
They would look with horror upon a renewal of Coolie im- 
migration, and we do not think they could be made to sub- 
mit to it. At the same time, what our relations are to be 
with the little brown man, are by no means settled yet. The 
paramount aim of this day and generation, is cheap produc- 
tion. To accomplish that end we are ready to sell our very 
souls. It is being argued on all sides that that nation 
which succeeds in producing most cheaply will win out in 
the contest for supremacy in the commercial world. Cheap 
labor is, of course, the chief element in cheap production. 
Where can that element be obtained at as low cost as in 
the Chinese Empire? The Coolie knows few or none of the 
wants of civilization. He works steadily all the hours the 
sun shines, he lives on rice, and thrives on it, and wears 
cheap but strong Nankeen cloth. He makes no home, 
raises no family, but, with his fellows, packs himself and 
them in a room like sardines in a box. Not the Latins, nor 
the Anglo-Saxons, nor the Teutons are in the race with 
him. For the time being he can be excluded from competi- 
tion by legislation. But there is a higher law than any 
made in Congress. Eternal progress was long in reaching 
China, but it is there at last, and cannot be stayed. If we 
will not permit the Chinaman to come here and work, he will 
make his workshops, and factories at home, and undersell 
the world in the products of his cheap labor. He has al- 
ready made a start in that direction, and his speed will in- 
crease as he advances. His country has coal and iron, and 
most of the raw materials, equal to the best. The time has 
come when he must find work on those materials, or emi- 
grate, or perish. There are four hundred millions of him, 
and his country will hold no more. Yet he is increasing 
and multiplying all the time. What is to become of the 
overflow? It is a serious question. It looks as if the Coolie 
is bound to become the labor machine of the world. Cheap 
production cannot be carried to its ultimate result without 
him. As competition becomes keener and keener, our farm- 
ers, manufacturers and producers generally, will fight 
Chinese exclusion laws, and it is very questionable whether 
in the contest that will arise the day laborer will win. It 
will be the most severe battle between capital and labor 
that has ever taken place. Mr. Kahn cannot too soon get 
his bill through. 



GAMBLING AND VICE IN SAN FRANCISCO. 

There is a great deal of humbug being talked about the 
fantan games of Chinatown and the houses of shame in the 
Tenderloin district. Against such places the law ought to 
be efficiently enforced, and without fear, favor, or affection; 
and we believe that is now being more nearly done than at 
any time during the past thirty years. The Mayor and the 
Chief of Police are being taken to task for proposing a 
scheme by which the gamblers and vicious women shall be 
arrested once a month, allowed to put up bail and forfeit it 
for non-attendance, as they always have done. The only 
difference between the new plan and the practice that has 
hitherto prevailed is that arrests are now to be made of all 
alike once a month, whereas previously only those were 
arrested who either refused or were unable to pay hush 
money to the police. Under the new system the law is en- 
forced. There is no condonement of a felony about it, as 
has been alleged. The guilty parties are arrested, the 
Police Judges are compelled to grant bail and, the charge 
being only a misdemeanor, the parties are not bound to 
attend, and the forfeiture of bail follows as a matter of 
course, and the law is satisfied. As a matter of fact, it can 
no farther go. The broad distinction between this r.nd ihe 



previous system is that now arrests are frequent and certain 
and the tines go into the public treasury, whereas formerly 
the arrests were uncertain and generally made because of 
"failures to provide," and the wages of sin were divided 
with the pet officer who understood collection, addition, di- 
vision and silence. That certain men were getting rich out 
of their share of those wages was long notorious, and woe 
came to him, whether he were a Police Judge, public writer 
or an honest officer, who did not understand the virtues of 
silence, and tried to break the system up. It may be and no 
doubt is humiliating to Chief Sullivan to have to confess that 
only by causing the police to arrest all alike can he keep 
them from extorting bribes. They were trained that way 
through no fault of his. The only cure for that condition 
of things is to dispense with all "the old pets" and train a 
new set to a new order of things. The merit of Chief Sul- 
livan's course is that it shows a sincere desire to break up 
the system by which the police have long battened and 
fattened upon the proceeds of vice and crime. It may not 
be an ideal way of dealing with vice, but the thing to be 
treated with does not permit of high ideals. Moreover, 
why do not some of the Chief's critics suggest a better way? 
The trouble with some of them, whom we know, is that his 
way cuts off their largess. We were told that under the old 
regime there was very little vice and no gambling in the 
city. Pshaw! It paid then to hush things up, and now it is 
hoped that it will pay to kill off every man who means better 
things. 



THE MEETING OF THE LEGISLATURE. 

California's State Legislature assembled on Monday last, 
elected a speaker, named its committees and is now ready 
for business. It may endure for sixty days on full pay and 
as long thereafter as it may choose to serve without pay. 
It may well end its term in thirty days, for it has really little 
or nothing to do. A reapportionment bill and a primary law 
are all that it has got to do. A United States Senator has 
not got to be elected this time, to tie members as it did in 
the last two sessions. A reapportionment bill is a mere 
matter of figures that an expert could settle in half an hour. 
The number of members can be neither reduced nor in- 
creased. The total population of the State has got to be 
divided by eighty, and each district has got to have as nearly 
as may be an equal number of voters. If gerrymandering 
and shoestring districts be not attempted, there is no reason 
why a just reapportionment bill may not pass both houses 
within two or three days. The Stratton primary law, had it 
been held to be constitutional, would have satisfied all the 
requirements of the case. Since then the people have 
adopted a constitutional amendment to meet the objections 
of the Supreme Court, and now the Stratton law could be 
re-enacted with perfect safety; and it would be well if that 
were done. Both houses might then adjourn sine die. Noth- 
ing worth wasting time over would then remain for them to 
do. But we fear there is no such luck in store for this much 
overtaxed State. We hear of members going to the Capitol 
with gripsacks plethoric with bills that have little jokers in 
them. Every well-to-do corporation and every successful 
material interest will have to "step up and see the boss," 
and members hardly able to raise carfare to Sacramento 
will return at the end of the session and, without work, will 
live on the fat of the land for a year or two to come. It 
will be the same old merry-go-round that we have witnessed 
ever since California has had a Legislature. We have had 
Legislatures of a thousand scandals, a thousand drinks and 
more than a thousand bills. It remains to be seen in what 
the present Legislature will be distinguished. There are no 
indications at present that it will "leave a record to be 
proud of." It would be otherwise if there were not dailies 
expecting a piece of the pork. 



The best satisfaction quietly given year in and year 

out has made for Swain's Bakery and Restaurant, on Sutter 
street, the name to which it has attained on the Pacific Coast. 
Swain's is one of the oldest establishments in San Francisco, 
and it has enjoyed an exclusive patronage for years. For 
a high-class meal, quietly served, there are few to equal 
Swain's in this city. 



—John W. Carmany still makes shirts, stylish and weH-nttlng. 
He Is at room 32, second floor Chronicle Building, 



J.nmry 12. 1901. SAN l»RANCI»CO NMM L1TTIR. 

How I Would Improve 
The Table Manners of Sorrvt.. 



Br REQINALO SCHUYLER. 

I have always contended that It Is Jiim ns ea«y for the 
roughest of us to be well mannered as to be bad m.i- 
The politeness of life requires no more effort than U 
garltles. There Is no reason why my plumber, for u 
should not eat his dinner In the same elean. prnrtl. I 
ner that I eat mine. But although I never hart had the 
pleasure of dining with him I am sure that he does not. 

This subject was suggested by a visit I paid the water 
f.ont the other day. I was waiting to welcome some friends 
on an incoming steamer and the pangs of hunger t» 
so persistent that I dropped into a little restaurant— the 
one that struck me as having the cleanest front— for a lunch- 
eon. I gave the waiter a quarter — he nearly dropped dead— 
and ordered something plain to eat. In remarkably quick 
time I was served with a "rib" steak and a cup of steaming 
coffee. The steak was thin, but what it lacked in thi 
it made up for in length and breadth. It was good, tender 
meat — something like a slice of roast beef fried in last 
week's butter. A big boiled potato accompanied It, un- 
peeled. I didn't mind removing the skin of Ireland's national 
fruit, and despite the maturity of the butter I enjoyed a 
unique and fairly satisfying meal. All but one thing — the 
service. 

Now in the water front chop house you do not expect to 
meet with damask, crystal, silver, and waiters in felt slippers. 
Indeed, as no table cloth is better than a dirty one I was 
glad to rest my plate on plain oil cloth. But the service 
was not as good as it might have been for the same trouble 
and the same expense. In the first place the waiter's 
hands were dirty, his nails out of repair; a fault easily 
remedied. Then he threw my knife and fork and spoon on 
the table with a clatter that could have been heard in the 
ferry depot. A little gentleness would have corrected this. 
The spoon, fork, and knife were half wet and quite sticky; 
an extra swish in the pan and a more conscientious rub on 
the dish cloth would have fixed this. The coffee was slopped 
all over the saucer; a smaller portion more carefully 
poured would have avoided this. The imperfections of the 
butter were, I dare say, a matter of price. But everything 
else that was wrong might as easily have been right. 

Bad service makes bad table manners, and bad table man- 
ners make anything, even crime. Let me see him with knife 
and fork in action and I will tell you what sort of a man he 
is. I do not ask that the water-fronters become howling 
swells. I do not even prescribe finger bowls for them. I 
mention them at all only because I happened to stray along 
the front and have it there occur to me that the bad manners 
of the poor might be easily remedied; that there really need 
be no class distinctions in the little decencies of life. It is 
all a question of example and influence. Listen. 

I remember several years ago spending a week in the 
little California town of Auburn. I left one hotel the first 
day because it was dirty. At the place of my second choice 
I found clean ta,ble linen and polite service at the hands of 
comely, willing waitresses who as far as neatness was con- 
cerned were dressed out to the nines. And I noticed that the 
men — were they farmers or railroad employes or miners or 
commercial travelers — made a most successful effort to live 
up to the atmosphere of the place. Coffee was neither 
spilled into nor drunk from the saucer. The knife was used 
for cutting not conveying food. The cloth was kept fairly 
clean, and at the noon-time dinner only a few of the rougher 
men gargled with their soup. Influence, example, cleanness, 
politeness — these were hard at work, and they did well. 

I blame the waiters and the restaurant Keepers for most 
of the bad table manners that one encounters. The next 
time a waiter brings you a flooded saucer or throws down 
the table tools with a clash, ask him to try it over again. 
You will be doing a service to the world at large. Servants 
in all stations are the better for a little severe attention 
now and then. Remember, frequently it is the servant who 
makes the man. I have seen the fiercest Nevada millionaire 
cow and hide his quill toothpick under the glare of a well- 
regulated waiter at the Palace Grill. 



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College San Rafael 



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Studio : 1406 Van Ness Avenue 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 




Tkarsurelx 
Wand 



CJkoiw 



ey no wand but Treasure 's .J 

— Tern Alport, 




" Am ; i minister I could but feel most keenly tbe comparative impotence 
of our pulpits — as compared with the power of your 'realistic plays.' You 
are doing: a brave and noble ae> vice in put line this before the world. Long 
and widely may ' 'Way Down Hast ' prosper." 

Rev. Horace Poetee, Plymouth Church. Brooklyn. 

I cannot hope to cope with the Rev. Porter in praise of 
this rustic melodrama that has been shaped from the work 
of Lottie Blair Parker by Joseph R. Grismer. I never have 
been able to cope with the parson as a press-agent; and way 
down deep between you and me I think the parson is a 
nuisance and a bore so soon as he mixes in the theatrical 
business. If you want to find out for yourself just how valu- 
able are these gentlemen of the cloth as dramatic critics, 
grateful for a brace of dead-head seats, observe the kind~of 
play they condemn and the kind they boost. What among 
managers and actors and practical, practiced playgoers^is 
known as "hog-wash" strikes a sudden dent in the suscep- 
tibilities of the pulpiteer. His idea of elocution is no bet- 
ter than his own forced, studied unhuman system of de- 
livery in his Sabbath place of business. But it is not so 
much that I fear the parson will ultimately rob me of my 
office of petty dramatic censor as the sort of pieces he 
praises, that moves me to protest. Good strong dramatic 
material worked into a play with brains in it, a play dealing 
with the vital issues of life, say "The Second Mrs. Tan- 
queray," or any of the Ibsen pieces — that is the stuff he 
pounds the pulpil and strains his throat to rail against. But 
give him "The Old Homestead," with Denman Thompson's 
real woolen socks, or "Shore Acres," with real turkey and 
a little child blowing a real little nose; or "Way Down East," 
with Mr. Grismer's patent snow-storm throwing whitewash 
all over the windows, and he will for the time being make 
even his property god a secondary consideration. 

As a dramatic critic the parson is a faker; you might as 
well send him to the racetrack as to the theater; he knows as 
much about one as the other. 

But the parson's praise of it need not kill "Way Down 
East," which pretends to be nothing more than a rustic 
melodrama larded with heart and tears and equipped with 
the usual vocal quartette. The good old white-haired far- 
mer is none the less plausible because there is a bit of 
harshness in his voice and incredulity in his mind, when the 
heroine with clasped hands and never-lose-me shawl asks 
him. for work and shelter This very gruffness, honestly shown, 
until he is convinced is, to my thought, a much more real- 
istic phase of the play than real wet water in the well and 
the copyrighted snowstorm. The young woman who in the 
usual melodrama fashion has gone through that vague pro- 
cess known as being ruined, only to be deserted by her 
lordly betrayer and married by the faithful son of the far- 
mer, is less up to the minute. With the quartette she belongs 
in that century which we have numbered 19. But a great 
many people weary of urban pleasures will enjoy "Way 
Down East," in spite of all the good things the clergy have 
said about it; and a great many suburban people will hike 
for town and imagine themselves quite close with the modern 
drama as they witness the regulation road production of 
Mr. Grismer's profitable pot-boiler. 



the house was warmed up in its fighting blood. I do not say 
that Miss Girard can sing; I do not say that she has any 
business on the Orpheum circuit; but I do say that the 
cowardly ruffians who hissed and hooted a woman who was 
doing her best to please them deserved rock salt from a 
Gatling gun. 

The show on the whole is good, if, indeed, not so good as 
the "road" bill that preceded it. The five Olracs are the 
only comic acrobats in my experience whose comicality is 
diverting and whose real work is thrilling. They amaze you 
in every minute of their act. A boy with a sharp, shrill 
voice, named Joe Santley. sings goo-goo songs with the usual 
cock-sure manner of spoiled juvenility, and Mr. Crosby and 
Miss Forman present an entertaining short piece in "A 
Duplicate Husband," a condensed melodrama of comedy and 
pathos and good substance. 

♦ * * 

The California has been throbbing all week with a flushed 
and swollen melodrama by the descriptive title of "Human 
Hearts," in which the village blacksmith weds with the 
lissome adventuress, who, of course, deserts him for the 
Tenderloin villain, who had in turn deserted her, and who 
kills the smith's father with a single thrust of his deadly 
dirk. Unlike most adventuresses of a business turn of mind, 
this one has been indiscreet enough to have a child by the 
man of the anvil. But she pays the price of folly by being 
shot by her lover early in the last act; and then everybody, 
even the hero, kisses the corpse. There is a thrill for every 
minute and a printed time-table to tell you just when they 
are coming. 

* * * 

"Women and 'Wine" carouse at the 'Central Theatre this 
week with Howard Hall as ths "patent, villain-proof hero 
and certain Parisienne corset displays intended to stamp the 
piece as risque. "Wine and Women" is a really clever 
melodrama, full of thrills and, in this case, staged with some 
elaborateness. 

* * • 

"Old Jed Prouty" brings his Down East twang to the 
Alhambra this week, where Richard Golden stars with a pass- 
able company and a somewhat picturesque play. Golden him- 
self is a good character player and his rendition is full of 
sympathy, but his company, especially the women, commits 
most of the faults of amateurs. 

* » * 

The fifth and last week of "Cinderella" at the Tivoli begins 
Monday night, after which the regular season of comic opera 
will be inaugurated with an ambitious production of Smith 
and De Koven's "The Fencing Master." "Cinderella" has 
proved a most enjoyable entertainment for everybody, and 
phenomenal box-office receipts have been the rule. For the 
last week more new material will be introduced. 
• • • 

The announcement that Mrs. Fiske will appear at the Cali- 
fornia Theatre Monday evening, January 21st, in her famous 
production of "Becky Sharp," is the most important yet made 
of the local dramatic year. During the past five years Mrs. 
Fiske has risen to the front rank of dramatic artists, and the 
honor she has reflected upon the American theatre is prop- 
erly a matter in which Americans take pride. She is the only 
actress of English speech who has been icempared with the 
two reatest actresses of Europe, Duse and Bernhardt, by cos- 
mopolitan critics and theatre patrons familiar with the 
world's theatre, and she is also the only player in this coun- 
try whose productions have rivaled the productions of Irving 
in their artistic completeness. 



In my less than three score and ten I have been witness 
to many strange, rude and disgusting happenings in a play- 
house. I have seen players hissed from the stage because 
they were obscene or drunken or because the audience was 
obscene and drunken. I have seen a comedian doing his 
best hot to disappoint the audience while in his hand was a' 
telegram telling him his child was dead. I have seen a 
banjo player egged and vegetabled. But none of these 
experiences was more jarring than mine of Sunday night, 
when Bettina Girard was hissed and cat-called by the 
rowdies in the Orpheum gallery. It was the sort of thing 
that makes strong men fight, and, judging by the appbuse 
that greeted Miss Girard at the conclusion of her poor little 
effort, it was evident that the more respectable element in 



It is claimed by the management of "A Breezy Time" Com- 
pany, the California's attraction for the week, commencing 
with the Sunday matinee, that it is one of the most laugh- 
able farce comedies before the American public, and that it 
has been the purpose of those interested in the production 
to make it such that every one who attends it will be glad 

of it. 

• • ■ « 

Next week will be positively the last one of the Alcazar's 
pretty production of "Nell Gwynne" written by Charlotte 
Thompson and played with Florence Roberts as the star. 
Miss Roberts has corrected many of the deficiencies of the 
original part, and her conception of the role has improved 
steadily since the ovation which greeted her on her first 



January 12. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO MWI LITTER. 



nlgbl hpf. I.lln Convrro will rrappoar In 
<1«>r." which la to follow. 



Ijl» 



The h>'».llln.' attra. | nPW b ,n „ 

Sam l.o.-kharta Habjr Elophanta. Thla la probath 
cat animal act In vaudeville. Ixx-khnrt l« a won 
trainer. ami he considers his baby elephanta hla miw 
This la their Brst visit to • 
nfl O'Rourke. comedian, assisted by M .iham 

and company, will present Edmund I>< 

Link, the minstrel, has forsaken the burnt cork arena for 
the vaudeville stage, and will appear In monologue 
0lra.es will remain another week; J. F. Crosl. 
Inei Forman and company, will present "A Model Hell 
by SI U. Collins. Among the hold-overs will be the Willy 
Collnls. Joe Santley. and the olograph. 
• • • 

The sale of season tickets for the Henschel recitals to be 
given next month at Metropolitan Temple has thus far 
broken all records during the few days the sale has been in 
progress at Sherman. Clay & Co.'s store. That the Henschels 
will have packed houses for their farewell appearances Is 
a foregone conclusion. 

• • • 

Mile. Antonia Dolores will give concerts at the Columbia 
Theatre on the afternoons of Tuesday and Thursday of 
the coming week. Mile. Dolores is well-known to San Fran- 
cisco music-lovers as Antoinette Trebelli, and the advance 
sale Indicates no diminution of her popularity. Robert 
Clarence Newell will accompany the singer on the piano. 



A MAGAZINE FOR THE POLYCLINIC. 
To say that free medical service cheerfully and merci- 
fully rendered by men of eminent ability is a noble work is 
to say a trite thing, perhaps, yet what the San Francisco 
Polyclinic has done in the past, is doing, and will continue 
to do, can bear the label of "a noble work." if ever work 
could. And it is with no little pleasure that we greet the 
issue of the San Francisco Polyclinic Bulletin, under the 
editorship of Dr. J. Wilson Shiels and Dr. Frank B. Eaton, a 
well-printed little magazine replete with treatises by the best 
known medical men in the West. Eminent among the papers 
contributed is one by the editor, Dr. J. Wilson Shiels, on 
operating for exophthalmic goitre, together with valuable 
suggestions for its cure. This essay, o£ great value to tech- 
nical surgery, is replete with that knowledge of the craft 
which gained for Dr. Shiels his present high position in the 
profession. A peculiar case of "broken heart" which came 
under the observation of Dr. Thomas B. W. Leland during 
his experience as autopsy physician, is interestingly set 
forth. Other contributors are Dr. George F. Shiels, Profes- 
sor Louis Bazet, Dr. C. G. Levison, Dr. Frederick A. Rinne, 
Professor Wilson, Dr. W. A. Martin, Dr. George W. Merritt, 
Dr. F. B. Eaton, Dr. M. W. Frederick. Dr. Rosamond L. 
Cox, Dr. Henry L. Wagner, Dr. W. Friedhoffer, Professor 
C. W. Jones, and Dr. Martin Regensburger. The object of 
this little magazine is to show the San Francisco public 
what the Polyclinic is doing, to demonstrate to them that 
this society is not dead, but very much alive. 



One of the numerous handy inventions which have 

originated in San Francisco is the commercial lunch, which 
gives many a good thing on short notice. This invention has 
been perfected at Fay & Foster's, who serve from 11 till 2 
daily at the Grand Hotel Caf6. 

• Be careful what you put on your complexions with a 

view to beautifying it, lest you get something that will ruin 
it. Camelline is recommended by Adelina Patti, Ellen Terry, 
Mrs. Kendall, and famous beauties galore. 



A glass of beer and a sandwich at the Caffi Zinkand 

means much more. It means the best music, the best ser- 
vice, the best surroundings in the city. If you have not 
been to the Zinkand after the theatre you have not seen 
the smart set. 



Artistic Hardwood Grilles. 
Made to order. Prices reasonable. Pacific Grille Co., Adams' 
Building, N. E. Corner Sutter and Kearny streets. 

Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



Columbia Theatre. 
Extra **• 

Afternoons of 

The Oapbrb !*r1ni* I»"nn« Kofruo. 

MDLLE. DOLORES 

(Antoinette Trebelli 

Kottrrt ' lsf*n>f Newell. Accr>mp*nu>t. N«w an 

prnffstTirnft. 

lUMnred Httabi-ll.fr>. tl and MoinU. Now ready. 



Golumbia Theatre. 



Oottlo*. Marx A - 

Ijtmmmm and M*n«fcr». 



To-nlfflil, Sunday night and all next week, the moat l«lk<-.| of 
!.<• NMOH, Mr. Win. A.Hrady'ft complete production of 
the pastoral Idyl 

'"WAY DOWN EAST" 

By Lottie Hlatr Parker. {elaborated bff JOB, R.Grl-imcr. 

Next Tuesday And Thura'ay afternoon* — Mdlle Dolore* 

( Antoinette Trebelli ) concerts. 



G-» I !•£..». !-* Tk«-«l^ THE popular iiorsi:. 
aiiTornia i neat. re- n«m miom by 'Phon*. HUni7u 

Commenolng Sunday afternoon Fit/, and Webster present their 
llilnrioiisly funny concootlon of rnlrth and merriment. 

A BREEZY TIME. 

Commencing Monday night. January 21«t. special entailment 
of Mrs. Fiske In BECKY 8M«RP. 
Prlces-*2 00. 11.60. 8100. and 60 cents. 



r\ 1 T 1 I BELA8CO & Thall. Managers. 

r\lcazar I neaxre. phone Main 251. 

Monday, January 14th. begins the third and last week of 
FLORENCE ROBERTS in the adventures of 

NELL GWYNNE 

Only Matinee Saturday. 

Jan. 21at "Sweet Lavender." when will commence the popular 

Sunday matinee. 

Seats reserved six days in advance. 

Reserved prices: 15c., 25o., 35c. . 60c. 

T' | ' r\ I— I Mas. Ernestine Kkelinq, 

IVOII Upera FlOUSe. Proprietor and Manager. 

Fifth and last week. Monday, January 11th, of the w6nderful 
holiday succbbs 

CINDERELLA 

by Ferris Hartman. Last ohanee to spc the big features, the 
Carmen burlesque, flu t the new songs and the tine finales. 
Coming— "The Fencing Master." 

Every Evenings at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp. 
Popular prices— 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



1 San Francisco's Greatest MubIc Hall. 

rpneU IT\ . O'Farrell St„ between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Sam Lockhart's 

BABY ELEPHANTS, 

First appearance in California; Eugene O'Rourke and Co ; Billy 
Link; The Olracs; Crosby and Forman; The Willy Colinis; 
Master Joe Santley; The Great American Biograph. 
Reserved Seats 25c.; balcony 10o.; opera chairs and box seats, 50c 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

Metropolitan Temple 

Only four days remain for the sale of seats for the HENSCHELS' 

VOCAL RECITALS 

to be given next month at Metropolitan Temple. 

Seats on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s Store, Kearny and 

Sutter Btreets. 

Prioes-49. 97, and 85. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand Is society's gathering place after the theater 

over. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 




Library^abk 



m—mm 



— £ 



Phaethon. The intellectual quality of Mr. Henry Abbey's 
verse must appeal strongly to those who know 
better than to "confuse form with spirit, or expression with 
the thing expressed." His style is clear and simple, yet 
vivid, and as a rule his poems leave one with a mental 
uplift which is as refreshing as it is unusual. His latest 
little volume includes besides "Phaethon," from which the 
work takes its name, and which is a fine translation from 
the Ovidian myth of the sun-hero, two metrical tales, the 
scenes of which are laid in the Orient. In "Veera," the 
better of the two, an Oriental prince, learning that his two 
brothers are plotting to slay him and seize the crown, flies 
from the bedside of his dying father, goes out into the 
world and gives himself up to books, for, he reasons: 

"There is no royal, gem-encrusted crown 
That so becomes a man as knowledge does." 
He is loved by Veera, who had been held captive for heavy 
ransom from a tribe of warlike Bedouins, and she alone 
knows whither he has fled. He reaches Vienna, and spends 
his time trying to solve two problems — how to make fine 
gold and how to exist forever on the earth. He chances on 
Mesmer's works and the Bible, and longs to find the Tree 
of Life. Veera joins him; they wed and journey up the Nile. 
The tale ends in mysticism, for they find the Garden of 
Eden and eat of the forbidden fruit of the Tree, for which 
sin Veera dies and the prince becomes prematurely old. 
With dimmed sight he sees 

"An angel mounting up, 
With shining presence and vast sweep of wing, 
Who in his arms bore Veera, now a gift. 
An alabaster urn of precious nard, 
That he was taking joyfully up to God." 

The prince returns to his own city and is crowned with 
pomp and show, though none know he is a Christian. There 
are many beautiful lines and quotable passages throughout 
this poem, which is original in conception and rich in Ori- 
ental imagery. Styles & Kiersted, Publishers, Kingston, 
New York. Price, 75 cents. 

Chloris of the Island. A deservedly popular laie of true 
love and wild adventure is "Chloris 
of the Island," by H. B. Marriott Watson; a tale of a century 
ago, full of the loose mariners and loud speech of the times. 
The first chapter opens with the abduction of a ward in 
Chancery and a murder, and through to the end there is no 
dearth of incident. On an island off the coast of England 
the fighting family of Carmichaels lord it over every one. 
They are smugglers and traitors, holding communication 
with Napoleon, carrying him information and stirring up 
the disaffected elements in Great Britain — Irish rebels, in 
fact, plotting to obtain the assistance of the French. Sir 
Stephen Carmichael has a handsome daughter, Chloris, who 
loves one Roger Warburton, the doughty hero, who has 
sworn to send the lawbreakers to the gallows. There are 
dark caves, deep oaths, plots and counterplots, play of pistol 
and clash of swords, with the usual romantic ending with 
"two hearts that beat as one." Harper & Bros., Publishers, 
New York. Price, $1.50. 

Nature's Miracles. The familiar talks on science which 
Professor Elisha Gray has been putting 
into book form for the purpose of conveying to the public 
generally a clearer understanding of the miracles of nature 
and science, are greatly in demand. The first volume, be- 
sides an interesting general introduction, treated of Earth, 
Air and Water, and the second dealt with Energy ami its 
manifestations of Heat, Light, Sound and Explosives. The 
third volume, just ready, is devoted to that most fascinating 
branch of natural science, Electricity. For thirty-five years 
Professor Gray has spent much of his time in the study of 
Electricity, and in inventing appliances for purposes of 
transmitting intelligence electrically between distant points. 



This latest addition to the "Nature's Miracles" series is, like 
its predecessors, singularly free from technical terms, and, 
treated historically, theoretically and practically, the sub- 
jects discussed, electricity and magnetism, are placed before 
the reader in a manner which combines the charm of sim- 
plicity with the greater merit of extreme clearness. All the 
natural sciences are so closely related that in order to obtain 
a clear insight into any one of them a general idea, at least, 
of the others should be had;, and while each of the above- 
mentioned volumes is complete in itself, a careful perusal 
of the trio will delight those interested in knowing how to 
use the infinite gifts that the Creator has hidden in nature, 
but "hidden only to stimulate and reward our seeking." 
Fords, Howard & Hulbert, Publishers, New York. Price, 
60 cents. 

Coeur de Noel. The author of the widely read "Peppino," 
Professor L. D. Ventura, has written in 
"Coeur de Noel" a charmingly simple little tale of a young 
American woman whose wont it was to spend a part of each 
Friday afternoon in visiting the poor children in the Italian 
quarter of Boston, taking into the lives of the Antonios, the 
Filippis, the Franeescos, the Maddalenes and the Praziellis 
something of the sunshine of their beloved, far-away Italy.. 
"L'AngeUl" they call her, and on Christmas day she is to 
them indeed an angel of mercy, a Lady Bountiful, before 
whom they bow in clamorous adoration. Another winter 
finds her in Naples, where she has accompanied a sister in 
delicate health. At Christmastide a serenade floating out 
on the evening air recalls to her mind the Italian street in 
her own land; the upturned, eager faces of the little exiles; 
their cordial "Betwgnuto'." or "Buon giornol" and the refrain 
of the song, 

"E penso sempre a voi, mio bel tesoro, 
Come a un angel del cielo, angelo d'oro!" 

seems to her fancy a benediction, a sweet remembrance 
from the poor in the squalid Italian quarter of her own 
distant home. The illustrations and marginal designs are 
the work of Miss May G. Norris. A. M. Robertson, Publisher, 
San Francisco. Price, 25 cents. 

"Women of the Bible." — The collection of remarkably in- 
teresting studies of the women of the Bible, by Cardinal 
Gibbons, Bishop Potter, Henry Van Dyke, Rabbi Gotthiel 
and others, which have appeared recently from time to time 
in a well-known weekly, are now gathered into book form. 
The volume is handsomely bound and is elaborately illus- 
trated with full-page drawings by Du Mond, Snyder and 
Tobin. Harper & Bros., Publishers, New York. Price, in 
box, $2.00. M. E. B. 



TIOOKS RECEIVED. 



Habpeb & Bbotiiebs: "The Riddle of the Universe," by Ernst Haeckel 
price 81.50: "Thrilline Days in Army Life," by General Georee A. Forsyth, 
U. S. A., price 31.50; "The Cardinal's Rose," by van Tassel Sutphen. price 
81.50; "The Mantle of Elijah." by I. Zanewill, price S1.50: "Lessons in 
Love." by Katrina Trask, price 31.25. 

The Macmillan Co: "The Influence of Christ in Modern Life," by 
Newell Dwieht Ilillis, price 81,50; "Foes In Law," by Rhoda Brouehton, 
price 81.50. 

J. M. Dent & Co.: "Ivanhoe." by Sir Walter Scott, (The Temple Classics i 
2 volumes, price 50 cents per volume. 

Little, Bbown&Co.: "Brenda, Her School and Her Club." by Helen 
Leah Reed. 

Wm. R. Jenkins: "Le Due de Reiehstadt," by Madame H. Casteenier 
and G. Casteenier, price 50 cents: "Daily Thoueh'8 from French Authors." 
by Jeanne and Marguerite Bouvet. price 81. 

Henry A. Dickerman &Son: "The Tribune Primer," by Eueene Field. 

Cassell & Co. : "Egypt and Scythia," by Herodotus (National Llbrary 
SeriesJ price 10 cents. 

"Heaven Not Far Away." by James Terry White. "The Work of the 
Ideal Church of the Twentieth Century." by Rev. Dwiirbt E. Marvin. 



To Cure a Cold in One Day 



Take Laxative Bromo-Qulnlne Tablets. All druggists refund 
the money if It fails to cure. E. W. Grove's signature Is on each 
box. 25 cents. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126 Post Street 



January 12, 1901. 



SAN FRANCI4CO NCW8 LETTER 




own Crier 



m ' - 




Ven vonce you hear OOf Bduard Strauss. 

You know dat dot las me, 
Der great Herr Melster to der King 

Oof Austro-Hungary; 
l'nd ven I Bee von gommon man 

I spreoken. "Ach te rauss! 
Vot right naff you too talk mlt me? 

I am der great man. Strauss!" 

Und ven run lopster in der pand 

Vot toot der pig drompone, 
Or blay upon der 'cello or 

Der sweet-voiced barytone — ■ 
Vot dink you mit dot fellow ven 

He shpeaks von vord mit me, 
Der august Meister blayer oof 
Der King of Hungary? 

Ven beoples make dat foolishness 

I do as mit Herr Hand, 
Und fine dem twenty dollars so 

Dey next time understand, 
Und if dey make dot spooch again 

I kick dem from der house 
For showing dot presumptiousness 

Mit me, der great man Strauss. 

According to a recent article in the London Daily Express 
it would seem that San Francisco is not the only city with 
an imaginary standing high kick against its Board of Educa- 
tion. A geography in use by the Oxford and Cambridge 
Board of Examiners describes Canada as a waste of "im- 
mense frozen plains and morasses covered with icy lakes"; 
and Johnny Bull here raises a leonine roar against the peda- 
gogues who thus discourages cockney emigration. Rudyard 
Kipling, too, according to Sir Howard Vincent, has again 
kipled himself into trouble by describing Canada as "Our 
Lady of the Snows." If Mr. Kipling is going to live up to his 
title of the Laureate of Greater Britain he must reserve his 
descriptions to nice, comfortable regions where the mercury 
stays up to please British colonists. For Canada, for in- 
stance, he could substitute a description of Samoa or South- 
ern California, and save his frostscapes for South Africa or 
Southern France, where it doesn't matter so much. 

It is just awfully grand to hear the Rev. Mr. Fisher of 
somewhere or other stand up in meeting and hurl at the 
gambling licenses. "Let us make no compromise with sin!" 
The idea of granting that sin must exist and that it is most 
tolerable when made a fruitful source of public revenues is 
all very sordid wrong and practical, the Crier is forced to 
admit. Mr. Fisher, who is so enthusiastic to denounce, 
doubtless has some better solution for the vice problem up 
his sleeve, where he will keep it till the crack of doom. 

"Oh, how I love that man!" exclaimed Rebecca S. Stein- 
berg, who had pursued her husband, Samuel, around the 
globe for the last nine years till she located him in San 
Francisco, where she had him promptly arrested. Thus 
Cupid again unites two loving hearts, long separated, and 
Rebecca may coo to her long-lost Samuel till the latter fur- 
nishes bail, or his term expires, when he may enlist or sail 
before the mast. So ends a pretty romance of sea and land, 
as the Examiner would say. 

Mrs. Ruff of Alviso may not have burned her four children 
in her ranch house. Maybe it was her husband, as she says, 
or maybe it was the hired man, or perhaps some of the neigh- 
bors. One of two things is fairly certain. Either some- 
body is guilty of arson and murder or somebody wants to 
get somebody hanged. Sherlock Holmes would not need 
much sniffling about to conclude that there was ill-feeling 
somewhere in the Ruff neighborhood. 



McK.nlaya Ut«.( » rt haa proved 

Though aoine In bate have even i 
lent i ermi 

• »t. 

II. 

In ninny 

rn.|u. II. .1 l.y Indigestive fears. 

Our PrWtdnl ItUdl ready — 
Ready lo brave a B«P 

To frighten even Teddy. 

In hia famoua "Farm and Garden Talks" Isaac F. Tilling- 
hast says that many California breeders of the nelglnn bar* 
have turned their stock loose rather than to continue to feed 
and rare for them, after discovering that there Is little or no 
market value in the slaughtered carcasses." Mr. Tllllnghast 
has discovered by actual experience that the market value 
of the so-called Belgian is "exactly on a par with common 
wild stock, about 10 cents each"! "and," says he, "I have 
just done what most others are likely to do — set them at 
liberty." Mr. Tlllinghast is a wise writer In his specialty, 
but this belated confession of his need never have been 
made had he read his Town Crier with the same regularity 
that Mr. T. C. reads his Bible. 

M. Bousquet, superintendent of the French Hospital, Is an 
ardent wooer, according to Miss Madge Hanavan, who has 
brought her appeal for a diploma as trained nurse into the 
courts. M. Bousquet, says the lady, is a Frenchman and ar- 
dent, and his persistent love-making alternated amusement 
and annoyance to the young and pretty nurse. Miss Hana- 
van may never get the diploma she seeks, but she has 
already done considerable service by suggesting to the pub- 
lic how some hospitals are conducted by some superin- 
tendents. 

A Nemesis' frown is 

Still cast on the Brownies, 
As Manager Friedlander finds. 

So, Brownies, both small ones, 

Obese ones and tall ones, 
Have taken their flight to the winds. 

A Fairyland hoodoo, 
A chicken-pox voodoo, 
Persisted these Brownies to follow; 
And smallpox and measles 
And other diseasles 
Pursued with a mockery hollow. 

No grey goose nor gander 

Is Mr. Friedlander; 
He knows when he's stuck in a puddle. 

Alas! he had nary 

A godmother fairy 
To straighten that Fairyland muddle. 

He was tired of rehearsing 

The ethics of nursing, 
And running a hospital; so 

To make the end certain, 

He rolled up his curtain, 
Packed baggage, and gave up the show. 

Guiseppe Marconi is another of your bright young world- 
discoverers who get their science into type before it is 
discovered and build illustrated scare-head pages on the 
strength of picturesque discoveries that might have been 
made. As a newspaper enterprise Mars is probably only 
second to Hong Kong as a field for journalistic imagination, 
and, with Tesla and Marconi as correspondents, who knows 
but that even the achievement of the siege of Peking may be 
surpassed? 

Prize fights are on the wane, bear-baiting is a memory of 
the past, dog fights are the worst of bad form; but still the 
por amateurs (now professional in the art of suffering) are 
targets for the hoodlum and criminal element every Thurs- 
day night at the Chutes. Either the people that pay for or 
the people that profit by these performances are equally 
good targets for the police, 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 




The boys of the Yale Banjo and Glee Club were, I think, a 
bit over-petted, and certainly their capacities tor sparkling 
drink were over-estimated by the men and women of the 
swim who had them in hand last week. After the first 
night's concert there was a dance at the Palace with a list 
of swell patronesses as long as your hand. The errant colle- 
gians hurried through the concert and arrived early at the 
scene of the dance. Everything was ready but the band. 
When at some minutes after eleven o'clock there was no 
music in sight or sound, and one of the visitors had sug- 
gested that fewer patronesses and more fiddlers would have 
made a finer ball, Mrs. Will Crocker came to the front by 
dispatching Arnold Pollac for music, union or non-union — 
anything that could make a noise. 

It was after midnight when Mr. Pollac returned with five 
impromptu bandsmen, who blew and sawed perhaps the 
worst combination of sound ever heard in the hotel. But 
the wandering minstrels of oid Eli didn't mind the discord. 
By this time the grape had commenced to get in its lively 
work. 

My opinion of the Yale visitors is that they are first-rate 
banjoists, second-rate dancers, third-rate warblers, and tenth- 
rate drinkers. Why, after they had been tucked in their 
warm, warm cots, a lot of the local men were just starting 
out to give some color to the night. And at the matinee 
the next day there was a bad collection of eyes and one im- 
portant musician among the missing. 
* * • 
Anna Shaw's "ideal man" is again before the public, this 
time, according to a recent Sunday supplement, "adminis 
tering small doses of culturine to Boston ladies at thirty 
thousand a year." Those who knew Professor Griggs dur- 
ing his Stanford regime, — a time of which President Jordan 
is loath to speak — must feel that the change is slight, 
and the administration much the same as in the older days. 
He had formed about him, while there, a clan known to the 
students as the Griggarian Colony, composed principally 
of former women teachers, in or past their prime. They were 
a pale-faced, thin-breasted lot, with fading hair, and they fol- 
lowed him about the Quadrangle or swarmed into the front 
seats of the University chapel while he spoke to them of 
the Ethics of the Soul. There was never any need of calling 
the role to see if they were all present; they were there 
always. There was never any need to command silence; 
a pin could have been heard had it fallen between the sighs. 
He used to stand just before the seats when he spoke, but 
they brought chairs and placed them in front of the seats, 
that they might be the nearer to him, and soon he was 
forced behind the altar rail — behind the altar. At length 
the colony grew fearful of losing him. They waited for him 
at his office; he would meet small droves of them when he 
turned a corner. At the height of his furore, one deluded 
soul declared to him (and not tete-a-tete) that she loved 
him so much she could no longer sit quietly and listen to 
him speak. It was a sweet confession made before half 
a class. 
But he was brave and noble. 

"You will get over it," he replied with soft sympathy. 
"You must survive it — for your own soul, you must! I 
would I could help you, but I cannot." 

Shortly afterward the department of ethics was abolished 
at Stanford, but the void still remained, and many an 
aching soul was left to mourn. 
* » » 
The college professor is a strange fowl. I had occasion the 
other day to attend a session of the local Philological So- 
ciety, a very learned body, and thereat a young professor, 
Richardson by name, from Berkeley, read an extraordinary 
paper on "Asclepiads." An asclepiad is not, as the unini- 
tiated might imagine, some sort of marine animal, but is a 
variety of verse frequently used by Horace. Now this 
young Gradgrind had taken pains to count all the syllables 
in Horace's asclepiad, and had classified them on an arith- 



metical basis. He maintained that he could plot Horace's 
poetical curve by the help of an algebraic formula. There 
were just so many monosyllables and so many polysyllables 
and there were 2048 differing forms of diaeresis and caesura 
employed by the poet. Thirty per cent of the verses had a 
monosyllable at the beginning and so on and so on. Proba- 
bly no man would have been more astonished than Horace 
himself to find a young man in gray trousers and uncanny 
bang holding a post mortem on his remains 1900 years 
after his death, and demonstrating how to write poetry with 
the help of arithmetic. It was a curious example of wasted 
energy, although by no means uncommon, to find an aca- 
demic cuckoo laying his blundering eggs in a poet's nest. 
• * • 

A most charming little story of how true merit was re- 
warded comes to me from, across the bay. The principal 
dramatis personae are fair and fashionable matrons who once 
in a while find amusement at the races. Their study of the 
"ponies" imbued them with such profound respect for the 
acumen displayed by a gentleman of their acquaintance 
whose business entails upon him the display of prophetic 
power in connection with racing, that they felt that the 
merry Yuletide could not be allowed to pass without some 
recognition of the fact. 

A leather medal seemed unsuitable; so, after consultation, 
investment was made in a gold watch and chain. Then it 
was agreed that a fitting inscription must be engraved on 
the chronograph. All went swimmingly until it was discov- 
ered that the engraver's bill was greater than that for the 
watch itself. However, this matter was straightened out 
after a meeting of the committee on finance, the bills for 
$2.10 and $1, respectively, being amicably settled. 

The next hitch came in when an opportunity for a pres- 
entation was sought. One of the committee wanted to get 
President Tom Williams to officiate, but some objection 
was raised. Another committeewoman suggested slipping 
the precious casket into the pocket of the prophet by 
stealth. This was promptly negatived by the others. A 
proposition that the gold timepiece should be intrusted to 
Uncle Sam's mails or the tender mercies of an express 
company was flouted. Finally the solution was reached by 
presenting the mark of esteem at an informal luncheon on 
New Year's day. The occasion was a touching one, and the 



Overland Monthly 

JANUARY, 1901. 

SPECIAL FEATURES IN THIS 



NUMBER: 



Welcoming the Buddha's Most Holy Bones (Illustrated) 

By D. Brainard Spooner 

Birds of Prey (Story) By Elizabeth Haight Strong 

After-Life (Poem) By Park Barnitz 

The Diary Habit (Essay) By Gilett Burgess 

Sister Filomena (Story) By J. F. Rose-Soley 

Mariposa Lilies (Poem) By L. Craigham 

The Adventures of Shunyaclah (A Legend — Illustrated) 

By Frances Knapp 

The Daughter of the Mayflower (Poem) 

By Charlotte Leech 

A Chinese Misalliance (Story) By A. B. Westland 

Picturesque Guanajuato (Illustrated) 

By Clara Spalding Brown 

Aloft (Poem) By Elizabeth Gerberding 

A Lawyer-Poet's High Play at the National Capital 

By George Selwyn 

The Arrowhead (Illustrated) By Eugene Elton 

California (Poem) By Annette Kohn 

Indians of the Hoopa Reservation (Illustrated) 

By Theodore Gontz 

Saved by a Mosquito (Story) By Fred Harvey Major 

A Woman Who Has Lived History (Illustrated) 

By Margaret Coy Kendall 

Discontent (Poem) By Ina Wright Hanson 

The Pan-American Exposition (Illustrated) 

By Henry Beever 

The Killing of Josiah Rockman (Story) . .By Elizabeth Sutton 
Books: To read or not to read. 
A Matter of Opinion. 



January 12. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



oiqulslte Inacrlptlon wm road aloud -:ih mack •modem 
Tlio proud recipient of the decoration was the admired of 
all admirer* a' rack nutw 

• aluo of th.- Kifl. It i» only a wonder that tb. 
u little more touch l nc 

• • • 

A Tory little boy who lives out I: ,t far 

Sacramento hung up a very big stocking on Christmas 
1 and wish.-, | aloud 
and tokens dear to the tnTenlle heart, am 
Christmas morning be found them all In his stock!: 
about the fireplace. And this Is what he I 

"By Jlmminy. mamma. Santa Claua must be an awful 
rubberneck.'' 

• • • 

Have you heard of the oyster roast? I am not speaking 
ol the common or restaurant variety of pan roast and dry 
roast and pepper roast, nor of the roast you get at home 
when you take your wife a cold loaf as a peacemaker. I 
mean the social function that is called the oyster roast and 
bids fair to become a hearty fad wherever great fireplaces 
and large rocks abound. It tickles me to see society looking 
up and doing something new and roasting oysters instead of 
itself. 

Out in Pine street at the Colonial Hotel last Tuesday 
night the first oyster roast of the century was celebrated 
with due pomp and appetite. In the great Colonial fireplace 
that is one of the picturesque features of the hotel great 
boulders were piled upon a blazing fire. On these the 
oysters were roasted by the men guests, ngged out in full 
cook costume. And whether they were enjoyed you may 
deduct from the fact that three big sacks of selected Eastern 
bivalves were put to the rock — not to mention the two kegs 
of beer served in steins. Twenty able gentlemen chefs 
attended the wants of some hundred guests, and everybody 
voted the night a unique and substantial success. The 
invitations that were issued were on the inside of large 
oyster shells and the objects of much curiosity. They read : 
"What noise annoys an oyster? Come Tuesday night and 
see." Dancing and music followed the feast for several 
hours. The oyster roast ought to become a great fad, but 
there are few places in the city with fireplaces like the one 
at the Colonial, and perhaps no other hotel where a score of 
amateur cooks and beer drawers could be pressed into such 
perfect service. 



A unique and cleverly designed pad for souvenir letters 
from San Francisco and the State of California is the Cali- 
fornia Scenic Writing Tablet. Every sheet is ornamented 
by three handsome half-tones of famous views in ornamental 
border, the paper is of good quality, and tor those who go in 
for illustrated correspondence nothing could be better than 
this pad. 



The Southern Pacific lost one of its oldest and most valued 
employees in the death of George H. Robinson which oc- 
curred at the Robinson home in Ocean Beach on Thursday 
last. 



Stops the Cough and Works off the Cold. 
Laxative Bromo-Quinine Tablets cure a cold In one day. No Curo, 
No Pay. Price, 25 cents. 

If your gloves, suits, tapestries, laces, ties, curtains, 

etc., are carefully cleaned by scientific methods, they will 
last twice as long and look twice as well, you will find. 
A cleaned suit is not a new suit, but it is the next best thing, 
if you cannot afford a new one. Spaulding's Cleaning and 
Dyeing Establishment, 127 Stockton street, will prove these 
facts to you if you have not tried them before or given them 
any thought. 

SOUTHPIELD WELLINGTON COAL 
recommended by the best dealers. 



For speaking to Eduard Strauss durine a rehearsal bandsman Hand was 
fined $20. He proposes taking the matter to court.— Daily paper. 

Lad" Graduate Leipsic Conservatory Muse. Beginners 50 cts. 
Room 41, 791 Sutt er St. 

Child character study, professional adaptation; diagnosis. MrB.W ttv 
McMtinu i, 731 Guerrero street. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Pears' 

To keep the skin clean 
is to wash the excretions 

from it off; the skin takes 
care of itself inside, if not 
blocked outside. 

To wasli it often 
clean, without doing 
sort of violence to it, 
quires a most gentle soap, 
a soap with no free al- 
kali in it. 

Pears', the soap that 
clears but not excoriates. 

All sorts of stores sell It, especially 
druggists; all sorts of people use it. 



and 
any 

re- 



A Perfectly Pure Olive Oil of the Finest Quality and 
Delicacy of Flavor. 

Crosse <St Blackwelfs 

1 Purveyors to the Queen 

Pure Lucca 

(Olive) OJ| 



Every Bottle Bears a Neck Label 
Guaranteeing its Purity 




Sherwood & Sherwood, 

212-214 Market St., Importers. 



CALIFORNIA NURSERY CO. 
Niles, Cal. 

JOHN ROCK, Manager 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL 

Oranges, Olives and Grapes 

Resisting Vines 

Rupestris St. George. Riparia Glolre de Montpellier. Riparia a 
grandes feuilles. Solonis Robuata. 

The largest and finest collection of Palms, Ornamental Trees, Roses, 
Shrubs and Vines on the Pacific Coast. Send for our catalogue. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 



FtnancialA 







There is a loud demand just now 
Will They that tne secretaries of oil companies 

Come to Time? comply with the law which requires 
the posting of monthly statements 
showing all disbursements and receipts and giving fully and 
in complete detail the financial condition of the corporation. 
This is mandatory, and, of course, the companies will have 
to comply with the terms of the law eventually. It is said 
that quite a number of new men in the business who have 
graduated as secretaries from all branches of trade seem to 
feel that they are a grade or two above the ordinary indi- 
vidual who may own shares in the company, and that any 
attempt at investigation is treated as impertinence. These 
gentlemen will get over this in time after they run across 
one or two of the old regime of stock dealers who have the 
power and know how to use it in dealing with disagreeable 
officials. The men trained in their business are, of course, 
all right and never make the breaks which the untried and 
verdant individual is guilty of at times. Civility in office 
is a cheap commodity, and this qualification should be 
insisted upon in filling the position of secretary by the 
Directors of oil companies. It will save them a great deal 
of trouble and expense in the long run. The promoters of 
oil companies are having a rather hard time of it now in 
disposing of their stocks. There are too many enterprises 
of the kind being handled, and enough active stocks are now 
listed on the Oil Exchange to satisfy the public craving for 
speculative investments, without putting them in a position 
where their money is tied up for months at a time, with no 
chance to sell or even borrow in an emergency. This is the 
view a great many people take of the market for oil stocks, 
and it is this which is making it so hard on promoters 
engaged in an attempt to trade their shares off at high prices. 
The Producers' Oil Exchange is 

Large Transactions growing in business and mem- 
In Oil Shares. bership. William Bannan, H. L. 

Van Wyck and F. R. Lewis were 
elected members during the week, and seats are now quoted 
$1,000, an almost clear gain for original members, who were 
not out more than a few dollars on first cost. Trading has 
been exceedingly active during the week, although the fluc- 
tuations in prices have not been very excessive. Peerless 
is now quoted in the Board, and the stock did not take long 
to run to over $9 after opening in the neighborhood of $5. 
Reed Crude Oil sold to the extent of some thousands of 
shares, being well patronized by a crowd from Pine street, 
who bought largely but only managed to raise the price a 
few cents. A company with 2,000,000 shares capital is an 
ungainly thing to handle, no matter how well backed finan- 
cially. The Caribou people have got oil at last, and of a 
very fine grade, in well No. 2, while discoveries in adjoining 
claims of late guarantee the value of their ground by demon- 
strating that it is likely to prove prolific when opened up 
in all directions. Petroleum Center and California Standard 
continue favorites with dealers, and both stocks have shown 
considerable activity and strength. Home Oil sold off a little 
on the strength of rumors that the next dividend will be 
passed, the bears using the report to good advantage, al- 
though nothing official so far has been announced in the 
matter. The general business of the Exchange looks 
healthier than ever and promises to swell into enormous 
proportions during the present year. The Lion stock has 
got a severe mauling from inside operators, who have dis- 
posed of large blocks of stock recently, and the only wonder 
is that the price has held up so well as it has. 

The market on Pine street has at 

The Pine Street last responded to the improved con- 
Market, dition of the Consolidated Califor- 
nia and Virginia mine. It has been 
slow work, but better late than never. The advance in the 
stock has been light in comparison with the prospects in 
the mine, but sufficient at the same time to make it unpleas- 
ant for a lot of shorts who have been forced to take their 



medicine. Of course a number of the bear clique are still 
out in the open, but some thought fit to fill, and their 
scramble for stock which is not over-plentiful when wanted 
badly served to stiffen the price considerably. The whole 
market has scored a light advance in sympathy, and most 
of the brokers have been working full time, which is rather 
a novelty for them after the dull siege they have passed 
through. Still higher prices are expected with the inevitable 
breaks which always attend liquidation by large dealers 
who buy in for a turn. At the South End Caledonia has 
been the most active stock, and it is said tho mine has shown 
considerable improvement of late. For the time the North 
End stocks are played as favorites, and transactions in them 
have been quite heavy of late. A more confident feeling is 
now apparent in the bull camp, and hopes are expressed that 
the street has entered upon a period of activity which will 
be prolonged for some time to come. 



Annual Yield 
of Gold Bullion. 



John J. Valentine, president of 
Wells, Fargo & Co., has just issued 
his annual report of the precious 
metals produced in the States and 
Territories west of the Missouri River, including British 
Columbia and Yukon territory, during 1900, which shows 
in the aggregate: Gold, $99,100,733; silver, $42,402,502; cop- 
per, $69,752,284; lead, $18,059,908; total gross result, $229,- 
315,427. Of this amount California is credited with $18,390,- 
754, of which $12,383,269 is gold, $2,038,366 in gold dust and 
bullion, $202,948 silver bullion ana $3,766,171 in ores and base 
bullion by freight. The total accredited to British Columbia 
and Yukon territory is $30,297,810, made up as follows: 
Gold, $23,344,560; silver, $3,750,000; ores and base bullion, 
$3,203,250. The year's combined product of the metals is 
the greatest in the history of the countries — United States 
of America and British Columbia and Yukon territory — that 
of gold, $99,100,733, being above any previous record officially 
reported; but the world's output of gold for 1900, approxi- 
mately $236,000,000, shows a decrease of $68,000,000 from last 
year. Australasia decreased $6,000,000, while the Boer war 
was the cause of the falling away of the product of South 
Africa. The British possessions of the Northwest increased 
$6,000,000, and the United States of North America about 
$3,000,000. 

The San Francisco National Bank 
A National is now paying a dividend of 2*6 per 

Bank Dividend. cent for the six months ended De- 
cember 31, 1900. This is in conform- 
ity with the conservative policy of the Directors, establishing 
a rate which they know can be maintained throughout the 
year. As this is one of the most prosperous banks in the 
city and in a position to pay a larger dividend, it is possible 
that the rate will be increased next year. The present 
management of this popular and safe institution is made up 
as follows: James K. Wilson, president; L. L. Cowgill, 
cashier; William Pierce Johnson, W. J. Dutton, H. E. Hunt- 
ington, George A. Pope, Henry Pierce and C. S. Benedick, 
Directors. 

The old Board of Directors of the 
The Nevada Nevada National Bank has been re- 

National Bank. elected as follows, to serve for the 
ensuing year: Isaias W. Hellman, 
president; John F. Bigelow, vice-president; I. W. Hellman 
Jr., second vice-president; George Grant, cashier; W. Mc- 
Gavin, assistant cashier. Directors — John W. Mackay, James 
L. Flood, Lewis Gerstle, Isaias W. Hellman, Hervey F. 
Allen, C. de Guigne, Robert Watt, Levi Strauss, I. W. Hell- 
man Jr., H. L. Dodge, John i''. Bigelow. The bank reports a 
very prosperous year, one of the best in its history. The 
assets are $13,110,944; deposits, $6,500,121, with undivided 
profits of $580,495. 



There is ranre Catarrh in this section of the country than nil other dis- 
eases put together, and until the lsst few years was supposed to he incur- 
able. For a great many years doctors pronounced it a local disease, and 
prescrthed local >emedies. and ••>■ constantly falling to cure with local 
treatment, pronounced ft incurable. Science has proven catarrh to be a 
constitutions! disease, nnd. therefore, require- constitutional trealin* nt. 
Hail's Catan-h Cure, manufactured by F. .1. Cheney & Co.. Toledo, t.hio. Is 
the only constitutional cure on the market. Itistakcn in ernally In doses 
from 10 drops to a teaspoonful. It acts directly on the blood and mucous 
surfaces of the sy-t- m. They offer one hundred dollars for any caso It toils 
tocure. Send for circulars and testimonials. Address, 

F. J. CHENEY & CO.. Toledo. O. 
OS" Sold by Druggists, 76o. 

Hall's Family Pills are the best. 



January 12, 1901. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Bubbles from the Swim. *wm »■ 



11 



Bt L* 

Society it diicutsing th 

•bout decided to appear '» (amtlli. You know at i: 

affairs many of the el- stay at noma because 

their fond paren' 

elbow with some one not In the swim— wl. , than 

flesh and blue blood can stand. 

Ami It's all because three years ago th.> beautiful Madam 
—but that's an old story. HoweTer, 1 1 . - • 
and ever since some of the girls ha-. ■ 
pleasure of King Carnival and hll ni.-ri i. com] 

Caro Crockett, for Instan r "among U 

ent." No doubt. Mr. Crockett is the i>.*t judge ol thai Then 
there are other girls — the Hopkins, s. Mar] s ii an. I half a 
dozen more who have not been permitted to lend their 
presence. 

Hut this year. I have It on the authorities ol the 
all parental restrictions arc to be removed: sn even the 
younger girls may go an' they choose. Buds and belli 
brides will be there. The affair promises to be a nugi 
cess, and already the people interested are rubbing their 
palms In gleeful anticipation. "Everybody going" is tl. 
sin that chimes sweetly to those behind the scenes. It will 
be held some time in February, and Ned Greenway will, as 
usual, be at the helm. 

* • • 

Which reminds me of a very pretty story on Ned. A poor 
old woman is in the habit of going down to his office and 
begging for alms. Not long ago she accosted him on the 
street and, with his usual generosity, Ned gave her a bit of 
silver. 

"You're a gentleman, you are," said the old crone, "and 
may God bless you and let you lead all the cotillions when 
you get to heaven!" 

Poor Ned gasped, and with a sigh said to Peter Martin: 
"Well, the only thing to do is to pray that there are no 
cotillions up there — or else go to the other place!" 

* * * 

Down Blingum way the sound of the hunter's horn, the 
impatient hoofing of the horses and the barking of the 
hounds break the stillness of these cold, crisp winter 
A number of girls are riding at the hunts, and, as usual there 
is the annual discussion among riders on the subject of the 
best woman rider in California. There are equestriennes 
and equestriennes — those who have mastered the finesse of 
"park riding" and those who can sit a horse on a mad 'cross- 
country run. 

Among the "park" riders Mrs. Hooper and Miss Rose 
Hooper are unquestionably the riders par excellence. Mrs. 
Hooper has also most of the lore of the veterinary surgeon, 
and can doctor a sick horse as well as a professional. Before 
her beloved "Caprice" came to an untimely end Mrs. Hooper 
was one of the enthusiasts at the San Francisco Riding Club. 

A new member — a lady from the Bast — heard Mrs. Hooper 
give a friend some points about the care of her animal. 
Several days afterward Mrs. Hooper was approached by the 
stranger and politely requested to call at her stable and 
take a look at some horses. "We haven't lady veterinary 
surgeons in the Bast," she said, "but you evidently know 
your business." 

When Mrs. Hooper came to she explained that she was not 
a professional, and then the lady had to be brought to. 

* * * 

But let us return to our "horse meat" — which is the Peking 
for mutton. As I said before, periodically a dispute arises 
over the "Queen of the Chase." Last year the papers gave 
the guerdon to Marie Wells; this year to the Brittan girls. 
Which, of course, proves nothing. 

At the end of one of last season's runs a discussion of the 
subject arose at the tea table. Some one suggested that in 
England a handsome hunting knife is usually presented to 
the Queen of the Chase. That gave Walter Martin an idea. 
He ordered one made, and then happened to think that he 
would have to discriminate among the three girls who had 
ridden most frequently at the hunts and with about equal 
skill. 

So Sir Walter nonchalantly ordered two more hunting 
knives. One went to Adelaide Murphy and the other two to 
the sweet Maries, Marie Wells and Marie Oge. Bach girl 



;. If not It. 






Health Giving 
QilA.Ulf* lo Infant- 
itonteo IS«jrU> Brand ' i\.-.i th*< hahy'n 

■ 



—After tw<*nt>'*fnur year* under the Tnlarr HoUl, Marsha Jap- 
■n«tw Finn Art Stnr-p nan moved to 214 Pom nraat. 



\ \i t-i SD B80CRI i I 
Bid. A«kod Mid. A-Vxr.l 

\Wirv i.ni A Inn*. Oo ctnal 

S Oil allfornta Porta m . . ■ 

Nanluirjr .tediicHon W'k* 1 MOrUnMl., M 

P*ool«*i Mutual IV!. Oo. ... 90 '»> Monarch 67 

i BO Btvml 

Monarch U 

Oil Stocks. 

Prosno Alpha (San Lion (Hud«i) 20 

Benito Ii.o"! SatuUor (Earn Rlvei LOO 

AxtecOll Oom'yftCern Kern River Oil and Da- 

Hirer SI. 4') velopmrnt ('.... 

Bachelor-* (Sunoet) 3-'> Meridian DP 

Me Pamwiie PanooheJ 20 Wellington 25 

■nd (dnnaet) 25 Bante Maria 08 

Hnmna Biw k«. 

Argonaut (Jnokson'i .... 2 7.1 ...... Victor Gold Minos 

Dutch (Qimrt/i 25 (Marysville) 00 

N. Light tOape Nome) 12}tj Ltsbtner (Angela Camp) 2 00 

Santa Roaalta(Mexleo)... 35 Muzomia ( fiiohimne) ...... 30 

Bmaawiek(Grasa Valley) 30 La Forluna (Arizona) 90 

Order* for buyine or Helling above stocks (listed and unlisted) promptly 
attended to by 

Joseph B. Toplitz. Stock Broker, Tel. Bush 886 

Member Producers' OH Exchange. Rooms 9 and 10, 330 Pine street. 

STOCKS. 
Wubb. Shares. H'et L'st Sugar Stocks. Shares. H'st L'st 

31 



Contra Costa Water... ;U5 



Spring Valley Water. 271 
Oas amd Electric, 



Gax and Electric 1775 

S F. Gi^light 300 



*¥, 25# 

21} H w:l 

41 4$4 



70% 70*4 Ha,lft 5° $4 

83% 83 Honakoa 80 31!-£ 

w/ * Hutchinson 325 25% 

Kilauca 490 

Kn.nt.il.le . . . 325 2% JH Onomea,..!."V""'.'/.Z!! 35 S 

Mutual Electric 25 8 8 Paouhau S PI Co 410 3lM 3V£ 

OaklandGae 80 49- * -JO;'* HTREET railroads. 

PftOiflo Gas Imp 65 44^ 4f/s Market Street 210 69^ 69 

Pacific Li /lit 5 44 44 tresidio Railway 150 19 19 

6 *Q Mihcellankous. 

4>i 4/a Alaska Packers 45 120 124% 

Pr.wr.i-nt. Cttl WtUC AwSll 115 100 lOO 

fOWDEEB. Oe-anlcSHCo . . 15 lol 101 

Giant 85 81% 83% California «nfe Depst 50 105 105 

Vigorlt 20J Z% 3 Bauk of California • . 28 410 410 

Transactions for this week amount to 5,744 shares stock and 
205 500 bonds against 4731 shares stock and 82,500 bonds for the 
previous week. 



THARfSHORN 

(SHADE RO LLERS! 

f areperfeot in action. Over 401 
years' experience puldes the I 
manufacture. Get the improved, l 
No tacks required. To avoid 
Imltatlons.notlce script nnnio of 
Stewart Hartshorn on label, 

Hiriing flachinery s n U p Plles 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

Bartlett Concentrating Table. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

PARKE & LACY CO., 21 and 23 Fremont St 

San Francisco 



business methods and buy an 
American Typewriter for 811? Docb he 
think I am running a puzzle department? 

The American $11 Typewriter 

is as well made as the highe-t priced 
machines, but more simple. It has stood 
the lest ; seven years without a competitor, 
"33,000, IN USE." 
Catalogue and sample oj work free. 



American Typewriter Co. 

A. Marriott, Pacific Coast Agent. 6 1*2 Kearny St., San Francisco, 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 



/— 




-"'•■ ■ - *i. ^ vi *f$ (£ 



nsurance 




The News Letter has consistently and persistently fought 
all kinds of schemes that came to its notice which, under 
the guise of assessment life insurance, as bond or debenture 
fakes, were organized to rob the public. It has paid its com- 
pliments on many occasions to the Pacific Debenture Com- 
pany, The National Maturity Company, The Western De- 
benture Company, and others, and various tontine and in- 
vestment companies, and now the jig for this class of con- 
fidence operators is about up. Local authorities may be 
monkeyed with and hoodwinked, the public may be bam- 
boozled into gold brick schemes, but when Uncle Sam takes 
hold it is time for those in danger to study time tables and 
pack grips ready to leave by the most expeditious route for 
Canada. The News Letter feels like shaking hands with 
itself over the fight which it has made for the extermination 
of these leeches, — and all this jubilation is over the fact that 
on December 5, 1900, the Honorable Harrison J. Bartlett, 
assistant attorney and acting assistant attorney-general for 
the Post-office department, rendered to the Postmaster- 
General an opinion as to the use of the mails in "The promo- 
tion of certain so-called bond investment schemes." The 
Report is thorough and voluminous, consisting of over one 
hundred pages. It sets forth the statutes relating to the use 
of the mails in promotion of lotteries and of fraudulent en- 
terprises; then goes into the constitutionality of the same. 
It follows by giving the status of the cases before the Post- 
office authorities, and quotes numerous decisions pertaining 
to the question. Among the items of interesting reading 
to the manipulators of these devices may be quoted the 
following: 

"It must, of course, be remembered that in criminal pro- 
ceedings which affect the liberty of the citizen the rules of 
evidence are strict, and wisely so; but the provisions of 
the statute which we are considering do not go to the liberty 
of the citizen, nor do they affect his rights. The use of the 
mails is, as we have before observed, a privilege, and the 
Congress has the power to declare what shall be excluded 
therefrom. It has declared that all matter relating to frauds 
is unmailable, and that no matter shall be delivered or money 
orders paid to a person or concern conducting a scheme to 
defraud. 

These provisions of the statutes are for the protection of 
the public; they are preventive, not punitive. It is not nec- 
essary that a scheme be consummated, or that any one shall 
have been actually defrauded, or that the Postmaster-Gen- 
eral shall determine the intent of the parties in order to war- 
rant him in excluding matter from the mails relating to a 
scheme the effect of which will be to defraud, or in forbid- 
dling the delivery of mail matter and the payment of money 
orders to a person or concern conducting such a scheme." 

"General Tyner, the Assistant Attorney-General, in a case 
before this office, referring to the statutes authorizing the 
issue of orders forbidding the delivery of mail matter and the 
payment of money orders, said : 'A scheme conducted through 
the mails for obtaining money by means of false and fraudu- 
lent pretenses, representations, and promises, is, in my opin- 
ion, one wherein inducements are held out, either of imme- 
diate or of future benefit, which are either at present un- 
true, or could, by proper inquiry, have been known as im- 
possible of realization, and which it was never intended 
should be realized.' " 

"It is my judgment that a scheme or plan of business 
which is promoted by means of promises which cannot be 
fulfilled, and by representations, pretenses, or suggestions, or 
calculations tending to demonstrate that the promises 
made can be met, when in fact the person making such prom- 
ises, etc., could by proper inquiry and investigation, which 
he was bound to make, have readily ascertained that it would 
be impossible to carry out the same, and that such represen- 
tations, suggestions, and calculations, were untrue and mis- 
leading, is, so far as the question as to the use of the mails in 
the promotion thereof is concerned, a scheme or devise to 
defraud by means of false and fraudulent pretenses, repre- 
sentations, and promises." 

After this the Attorney-General elaborates at length a 
variety of different contracts of bond schemes and diamond 



brokerage devices — schemes which are run on multiples or 
on successive numbers — diamond schemes of all kinds of 
carats and waters, and explains the means by which cou- 
pons and bonds are matured and shows how the diamonds 
are distributed, exposes in several cases the subterfuge 
which it was hoped would avoid any adverse action on the 
part of the Post-office authorities, and in one case quotes 
from an opinion of Attorney-General Olney: 

"This is ingenious and specious enough, no doubt, to induce 
subscriptions by the unthinking. At any rate, the company 
is eager to make the attempt, though it is not willing to 
eliminate the preferred-coupon feature. But it is manifest 
that if every subscriber, by merely comparing the number 
on his bond with the order of numbers printed on the back 
of it, could tell with any approach to certainty the order 
ill which his coupons would be reached for payment, no- 
body would take the bonds which are to be passed by, and 
unless these are taken there is an end of the business. One 
might as well try to run an ordinary lottery without blanks 
as such a preference investment scheme without any unpre- 
ferred. Someone must lose what others gain." 

In another opinion by the same authority given March 19, 
1894, it is held 

"that a company issuing bonds in numerical order, which 
v. ere redeemed in the order of 1, 6, 11, 16, 21, 26, etc., using 
the numeral 5 to determine the order of maturity, was con- 
ducting a lottery." 

The case of the United States b. McDonald 59, Federal Re- 
porter, 563, is cited and applies exactly to the San Francisco 
concerns. The court says: 

"It is insisted that the element of chance is wanting in the 
scheme, but its presence is manifest. It is not present, 
primarily, in the uncertainty of the time when a bond will 
be paid, because once bonds have been issued the order of 
payment is governed by fixed rule, and a time of pay- 
ment is uncertain only so far as it depends upon the 
amount of business done by the company and the number of 
lapses of bonds of earlier issue. The element of chance 
which condemns the scheme is incident to the numbering of 
the bonds before issue, and not directly to their payment 
afterwards. By the table, which determines the order of pay- 
ment, bond No. 1 is payable first. No. 5 next. No. 2 next, and 
so on, alternating between numerals, so-called, and multi- 
ples of 5, except, it will be observed, that between every 
fourth and fifth of the multiples no numeral intervenes. 
* * * Now, whether or not a purchaser will obtain a bond of 
one number or another depends, as the evidence very clear- 
ly shows, upon the order in which his application shall reach 
the hands of the secretary, and that is largely a matter of 
chance." 

The California case of the United States v. Fulkerson (who 
lived and ran one of these schemes in Los Angeles, Cal.) 
is summed up as follows: v 

"There are three methods of redemption adopted in the 
particular scheme which is used as typical of the class now 
under consideration. First, the grand special redemption 
method, which is consecutive; second, the special redemp- 
tion method, under which every tenth unredeemed coupon 
as shown by the register is paid off; third, the general re- 
demption method, in which the redemption is made by 
means of a numeral. 

"In my judgment the authorities I have cited fully sustain 
my conclusions that the period of redemption, and conse- 
quently the amount that will be paid upon any coupon by 
means of either of these three redemption methods, is de- 
pendent upon chance, and the returns or prizes being unequal 
the scheme is, therefore, a lottery or similar enterprise for 
the distribution of prizes by lot or chance." 

Mr. David Parks Fackler, the eminent consulting actu- 
ary of New York, shows mathematically the impossibility 
of the fulfillment of many of these schemes. In his summary 
of conclusions the attorney-general says: 

"My opinion as to the fraudulent features of the schemes 
is not based on the criminal portions of the statutes, whic 
make it an offense to use the mails in the promotion of a 
scheme to defraud, for these are punitive, but upon those 
provisions which declare that all matter relating to schemes 
to defraud by means of false or fraudulent pretenses or 
representations shall be barred from the mails. These pro- 
visions are to prevent the public from being defrauded, and 
this Department in their enforcement is not bound by the 
same rules which a court must observe in depriving a citi- 
zen of his liberty for violation of the laws. You may close 
the doors of the postal service against any person who 
seeks to use its facilities in the operation of any scheme 
which will result in defrauding the public. 

"I do not deem it necessary, as I have stated, that you shall 



January 12. imi. 



floil >n int.-ni In part of U 

'"r to authortu 
latlnc I 



BAN FRANCItCO NtWI LETTER IS 

fl«e. HARme, AND INLAND INSWRANOB 



If It »• 
think 
as I I 

by sari n c that all Ihi 
nature of lottcrlis or a1mll 

laUone ami blunders, from whlrh 
which will suffer ami 
tlnuc. shoultl lie protected; and the pn 

- will In* much better off In the end If 
now and compelled to put their • 
the inevitable collapt 
Postmaster-General Ch. Emory Smith says under •' 

"I return herewith an opinion addressed I" me lindl 
r 5, 1900, by Mr. Harrison .1. Barrett, your 

INSURANCE 




The Pacific Mutual Life lnsuran ^ fornia 

Oreanlzed 1868.) Paid Policyholders, $1 1 ,000.000 

Kilgarif «fc Beaver, General Agents Life Department 
F. W. Vooqt, General Asrent Acoldent Department. 

Pacific Mutual Building. S. F. 

Fire, Llehtnine, and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital, $3,000,000 Gross Assets, $12,808,395 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $7,631,926 
H, L.Ropf, General Atrent; Geo. M. Mitchell & Co., City Agents, 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal- 
The Home has a -well-organized, competent, and experienced force of Gen- 
eral and Special Agents resident in the Pacific Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of its aeents and the Insur- 
ing public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pay- 
ment of Losses 

New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of NevV York 

405 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Edmchd F. Gbeen, Manager. Jesse W. Liliebthal, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability, Accident. Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Phenix Insurance Company of Brooklyn, n.y. 

capita, " 5 MONTGOMEEY . S ?::.. S '.. P :. «..ooo.ooo 

Stz::::::z=:::::=: »» 

Assets 6,816,560 

GEO. T. WELLINGTON, State Agent for California. Oregon, and 
Washington. 

Pacific Coast Underwriting Co. 

Main Office— 507-508-509 Parrott Building, San Francisoo. 
Companies Incorporated Bond furnished to guarantee stocks. Oil lands 
and mining properties for sale or lease. 

E. D. CORING, President. 
W. B. BURKOWS. Secretary. 
J. E. FIRMSTONE. Auditor. 



FIREMANS FUND 

IN8VRAN0E COMPANY OF 8AN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 
PALATINE 

INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) OF MANCHESTER ENOLAND 

SOLID SECURITY OVER $9,000,000 RESOURCES 

CHA8. A. LATON. Manager. 439 California atreet, S. F. 

FIRE TNBURANCK 

Founded A. D. 1791 

nsurance Oompany of / North America 

OP PHILADELPHIA. PENH. 

Paid-up Capital 83.000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 85022.016 

JAMES D. BAILEY. General Agent. 412 California street. 8. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up, J3.446.100 Assets. fc24,034.110.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. 89.612.455.96 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

op New Zealand 
Capital. $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hookeb 3l Lent. City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 
BUTLER & HEWITT, General Agents 413 California street. S. F. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

OF HARTFORD. 

Cash Capital 81,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 3,869,451.75 

Surplus to Policy Holders , 2,068,839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital ..86,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street, S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital, 82,250,000 Assets, 810,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pac ific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome atreet. S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. SCHLESINGER, City Agent, 304 Montgomery street, San Francisco 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 



ant, as acting assistant attorney-general, and approved by 
you under date of December 7, 1900, in which he holds that 
the plans of business or schemes of certain so-called bond in- 
vestment companies as set out in said opinion are in the 
nature of lotteries and fraudulent schemes within the mean- 
ing of the statutes which prohibit the use of the mails in 
the promotion of such enterprises. I approve of the conclu- 
sions reached by Mr. Barrett, and the course he advises in 
dealing with these companies, which have probably laun- 
ched the schemes they are now operating through blun- 
ders and miscalculations rather than intentional fraud." 

This is a New Year's gift the News Letter hands out to 
its readers and incidentally tenders its condolences to those 
men who have had and have the misfortune to be mixed 
up with nasty schemes of this nature, and in the language 
used by the Postmaster-General, hopes, although it doubts. 
that "they are now operating through blunders and miscal- 
culations rather than intentional fraud." 

Now it is safe to say an order will be issued at once by the 
Postoffice authorities prohibiting the use of the mails to those 
frauds, and then the victims will howl for what the victim- 
izers have left, and some reputations that have heretofore 
stood well in San Francisco will suffer in the wind up of 
these swindles, and in the necessary expose which the vic- 
tims will enforce. 



Mr. Rhorer was appointed Deputy Insurance Commis- 
sioner by J. W. Foard on January 1st, 1876. Mr. Foard's 
term expired April, 1878. He served successively under 
John C. Maynard to 1882; under George A. Knight to 1886; 
under J. C. L. Wadsworth to 1890; under J. N. E. Wilson to 
1894; under M. R. Higgins until that gentleman's resigna- 
tion in May, 1897, and has been with the present commission- 
er since his appointment to that office. After twenty-five 
years' service the insurance men of this city thought it 
seemly to tender him some token as a mark of their appre- 
ciation of his unfailing courtesy and desire to oblige them. 
W. R. Higgins started the ball and all the underwriters, Are, 
life, and accident, rolled it along, and as a result, on the 
last day of the year, in the home office building of the Pacific 
Mutual Life, where Mr. Rohrer had been beguiled, he was 
tendered a cheque for $1,145 on his acceptance. Mr. Rohrer 
said, while he valued the gift, he equally appreciated the 
spirit in which it was given. The News Letter trusts the 
same thing will happen at the semi-centennial of Mr. Roh- 
rer's service in the Insurance Commissioner's office. 

• * * 

The Chosen Friends, a fraternal benefit order, having 
buncoed each other until they broke up, are now open ene- 
mies. 

• * * 

Daniel A. Heald, President of the Home Insurance Com- 
pany of New York, died December 23d, at his home in West 
Orange, New York. He commenced his underwriting ex- 
perience as a local agent in 1842, and became connected with 
the Home in 1856. In 1883 he was vice-president of the Home 
and in 1888, on the death of President Martin, he was elected 
Fresident. When he first became connected with the Home 
its total assets were about eight hundred thousand dollars. 
He helped and guided its growth until its assets reached 
over $12,000,000. His eighty-three years of life were well 
spent, and he made history in the world of fire underwriting. 

• * * 

T. J. Conroy has been appointed Pacific Coast General 
Agent of the Caledonian American, which takes the place 
in his agency of the American, preserving his carrying ca- 
pacity the same as heretofore. 

D. J. Coleman, the Northwest general agent of the Home 
Insurance Company of New York, is in the city. 

The News Letter, the public, and no one else, apparently 
not even the company itself, knows what the Scottish Union 
and National is going to do. 



New Goods Arrived. 
An elegant new stock of fine art, bronzes, marbles, vaces, 
bric-a-brac, and French furniture, from the different art cen- 
ters of Europe, selected at the Paris Exposition, can now be 
seen at S. & G. Gump Co.'s Art Store, 113 Geary street. A 
number of new paintings and water colors by some of the 
foremost European artists selected this year have also ar- 
rived, and are now on exhibition. 




Deafness Overcome: 

Science has triumphed at last. 

Latest and greatest invention up 
to times. " Invisible Ear-phone." 
Conveys sound directly to nerve of 
hearing. Appliance inserted in eat. 
Vibrating coil acts like telephone. 
Reasonabe. Head noises, ear dis- 
charges cured quickly. Wiite for treatise and testi- 
monials free. 

INVISIBLE EAR PHONE CO., 

1230 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hotel Bartholdi, 

THE very center of the city, convenient to 
all the ble stores and all places of amusement. 
European plan, 9l a day and upwards. 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Square Park) 
Finest cafe in this city. 



Milton Roblee. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Wm. B, Hooper, Manager 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

San Francisco 



RIGGS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C. 

The Hotel •• Par Excellence" 



of the National Capital. First-class in all appointments. O. G. 
Staples, President; O. Devitt, Treasurer. 

American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

Paraiso Hot Springs 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 



Monterey County , Cal. 



C. T. Romie, Proprietor 



J. B. Pon. I Pierre Carreer, Pounder of Malson Tortonl. I C. Lalanne 

Old Poodle Doq Restaurant 

445 Bush street, cor. Grant Avenue, San Franoiaco 
Lunch. 60 cts. Dinner. 75 cts. Also, a la carte. 



I. Dectoh, Proprietor. Telephone, Main 5544 

Crystal Palace 

S Kearny St., 12 Geary St., S. F. Cal. 

Choice Wines and Liquors. 



Cafe Royal, 




Corner Fourth and Market streets, Snn Francisco, 
Try our special brew steam and latzer beer, 5 cents. 
Overcoats and valiBes checked free. 



ST. LAWRENCE Livery and 
Sales Stable 

423 Post Btreet. between Powell and Mason, 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1323 

W. E. Bridge, proprietor. 



January 12, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



Plvim Puddirv' Gives 

Nick Tesla. His Dues. 



Bt HORACE EGBERT. 

"Say." aaid Plum Puddin' Tommy, as he glanred up from 
a morning paper In which He bt .line an ., 

ige from Mars, "say. 1 know a I , 
guys 'd give a lot o' coin f day ooul.i on y cit da brand din 
duck smokes. Wonderful dope! wonderful: So he had a 
conversation wid Mars, did bat I hope de main guy Op 
and all de rest of de poppulation Is well an' havln' a happy 
New Year. 

"Oh. yes; I guess dls Testers all rlKht. Anyhow, he's no 
piker. Mars! In yer old brown hat: (fix far me. i 
he's light upstairs. But den. o'course, he might not be 
an' he might ha' had a message from de planet. 

know, all dese wise guys got de ha-ha whi i 
used ter spring anyt'ing other people couldn't git wise ter. 
Yer remember Ike Newton? I used ter read about him in 
the thoid reader. Dat's as far as I got at school. Well, one 
sunny afternoon he was loafin under a apple tree Wen he'd 
oughter ben hoein' re old man's spuds, an' a apple dropped 
down and hit him on de nut, and right dere he disco 
the earth was round. An' dat old Dago dat de racehorse 
was named fer — Galilee, yer know. He peeked t'rough a 
spyglass one day, an' told his wife dat he had discovered Je 
force of gravity. 

"All dem fellys got de rawsberry wen dey sprung deir 
dope on de populace. I heard a yarn once about a Scotch- 
man dat invented de steam ingine by burnin' his fingers 
wid his ma's fryin' pan. All dese t'ings came off, didn' dey? 
An' we ses to ourselves, wot a lot o' daffy guys de common 
people must a' been, not ter see right away dat Ike Newton 
and Galilee and de others wus on de level, an' not tryin' ter 
string 'em. 

"But dis Nick Tesla, he's a peach. He's always a-makin' 
some startlin' discovery wot's goin' ter upset de world, an', 
by way o' pastime, earn nine er ten millions a week fer him. 
I guess every time he takes a pill he discovers a new one. 
But he must a' swollered de whole box de time he sprung 
dat tip about Mars. Dat beats anything Eighty-Thousand 
Dollar Brown ever sprung, an' he was purty good himself. 
But den, Brown didn't have Tesla's scientific education, er 
he'd a bin dere wid both feet. I guess it kind o' makes 
Brown sore ter see Tesla gittin' so much reputation on 
account of his imagination. 

"O' course all de Oder guys are dere wid de knock. Dey're 
all sore because Tesla beat 'em to it. All of dem proberbly 
had exchanged words -wid some feller in Mars, but dey was 
afraid ter spring it, fer fear o' gittin' kidded. Ye've got ter 
give it ter Nick fer dat. I hope it's true, anyhow. Mars 
would be a good place ter git a little infy from about horse 
races." 



The J. F. Cutter brand of whisky stands the test of 

time, makes friends and has no enemies to rise up and 
blame it for the woes of life. It has a flavor that makes 
it enjoyaole for itself; it lacks the bite and venom of the 
commercial "bug juice," and stimulates where cheaper whis- 
key irritates and kills. J. F. Cutter whisky is a gentleman's 
drink for gentlemen — a fact which gentlemen recognize 
pretty generally. Drink it once and you will not be satis- 
fied with any other. 



Get your carpets cleaned before the spring and you'll 

get ahead of the season. There is no weave so delicate or 
so dirty that you cannot entrust it to Spaulding's Carpet 
Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street, with perfect satisfaction 
assured. The latest improvements in machinery and the 
very best workmen are employed by Spaulding, who has 
made his business an art. 



■ THE NICKEL PLATE ROAD (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. K.J 

offers East bound passengers three elegantly appointed ves- 
tibiiled express trains daily between Cnicago and New York 
and Chicago and Boston. For sleeping car reservations and 
full information address Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast Pas- 
senger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

G H Mumm & Co.'s brand of champagne has become 

a classic in the fashionable cafes and clubs throughout 
the country for the manufacturer has made the best wine 
and maintained the highest standard of excellence. 




T//<" 



/, 



Ol 



W///V7, 



• 



•1 $4,482,750 

I «nJ nn flri-,,r an /- l '»P llllll '» WI 'i l 2,241.375 

London Assurance A88Pt9 ,9.195,145 

Capital Subscribed $5,000,000 

Orpan Marinp Capital PaM Up 500,000 

ucean marine AggeU 2.502.050 

C i ty Index and Purchasers' Qu i d e . 

RESTAURANTS. 

POODLE DOG Restaurant. N. E. corner Eddy and Mason 8ls.. 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone. Mai\ 

A. B. Blanco jk U. Bru-1. 

BAY STATE OYSTER HOUSE AND GRILL ROOM, 15 Stock- 
ton street and 109 OFarrell street. N. M. Adler, Proprietor. 
Telephone, Main 5057. 

BERGEZ RE&i'AURANT— Rooms for ladles and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez. Proprietor. 

NEVADA RESTAURANT, 126-130 Geary street. Private roo.jis 

for parties. 'Phone, Main 1179. Noel P. Loupy. Proprietor. 

MAISON TORTONI, French Rotisserie, 111 OFarrell streut. 
Private dining rooms; banquet hall. S. Constantlni. Pro- 
prietor. 

HOTELS. 

PALACE AND GRAND HOTELS— Connected by overhead pas- 
sageway; under one management. Palace Grill Rooms a fea- 
ture. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTBIr-a quiet home centrally located; flrst- 

class. "Wm. B. Hooper, Manager. 
RUSS HOUSE— J. S. Young, Proprietor. Leading business and 

family hotel. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 

W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan street. Selections on approval; any 
place in the world. 

BOILER MAKERS. 

P. P. DUNDON'S San Francisco Ironworks, 314-316-3*8 Main 

street. Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 

rl. Isaac Jones, M. D. E>e , Ear , Nose , and Throat. 

Office — 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 
streets, S. F. Hours, 10 a, m. to 4. p. m, 

Sunday by appointment, Tel. Grant 101. 

Worthington Ames 

Member Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Sale Deposit Bulldine, 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1381 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crookeb BnrLDlNO. San Franclwcn, 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, THE AWA SioAao. » 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-1S39. These pens are ' the 
best In the world." Sole agent for the United Htatei 
Me, Henet Hob. 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers, 

A. B. TREAD WELL Attorney-at-Law 

(Formerly Judee Police Court No. i) 

HAS RESUMED PRACTICE at 633 Kearny St., cor. Sacramento St. 
All leeral business attended to promptly. 

Blake. Moffitt & Towne Telephone M a,„ m 

Dealers in PAPER 



Blake, Moflit & Towne. Los Angeles. 
Blake. MoFall * Co., Portland Or. 



65-57-59-61 First street, S. K. 



Weak Men and Women St^mS ™'X 

It elves health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 
street San Francisco. Send lor circular. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 




Two balls last week and two balls this week is a pretty 
good showing for the early part of January. The "Blingum" 
ball, as it was popularly termed, took place in Maple Hall 
of the Palace Hotel on Wednesday evening and was a notable 
assemblage of those best known in our world of fashion; 
elaborate decorations, beautiful toilets, excellent music and 
a splendid supper is a combination sufficient to prove the 
success of such an affair. Last evening La Jeunesse Club 
gave their second ball of the season, the third and last being 
named for the 18th of February. And last evening also the 
Deux Temps Club gave a dance at Golden Gate Hall, and 
there will be two large dances next week also which might 
be termed balls in size at least — the Fortnightly gathering 
on Friday night and on Saturday evening the Chrysanthe- 
mums' dance at Cotillion Hall. 

Among the larger gatherings of the season will be the 
annual ball of Golden Gate Commandery, Knights Templar, 
which is always a feature of the winter's festivities. There 
will be two guests of honor, Grand Master of the Knights 
'templar Reuben Lloyd and Grand Commander of the State 
of California Fred M. Miller, and the preparations now being 
made indicate an elaborate affair. 

Wednesday is apparently the favorite wedding day this 
winter. Last month there were several on that day of the 
week, and January is being equally favored. Miss Elizabeth 
Bigelow was last Wednesday's bride, Miss Lillian Follis 
followed suit this week, and next Wednesday will be the 
wedding day of Miss Margaret Cole. 

A more beautiful day a bride could hardly desire than 
was last Wednesday, when at high noon Miss Lillian Follis 
and Frank GrifHn were made man and wife.' The ceremony 
was performed at the Follis residence in Washington street, 
Rev. Father McQuaide officiating, beneath a bower of roses. 
The decorations of the entire house were elaborate and 
beautiful. The bride, who was unattended, was given away 
by her brother Clarence; she was robed in white satin richly 
trimmed with lace, and wore a wreath of orange blossoms 
and tulle veil. The groom's brother Maurice appeared as 
best man. The guests were limited to relatives and a few 
friends, and after the ceremony an elaborate dejeuner was 
served. Mr. and Mrs. Griffin have gone to New York to spend 
their honeymoon, and will return about the middle of 
February. Miss Follis was the recipient of an unusual num- 
ber of handsome presents, prominent among them those of 
her cousin, Miss Jennie Flood, who gave her the entire 
trousseau, an immense chest of silver and a quantity of 
beautiful bric-a-brac. 

The Cole wedding next Wednesday will be a very quiet 
one, and the guests will not exceed two score. Miss Florence 
Cole will attend her sister as maid of honor, and members 
of Lieutenant Crimmins' family are now en route from the 
East to be present at the ceremony. 

A quiet wedding took place at the residence of Mr. and 
Mrs. Rosenbaum in Jackson street last Sunday afternoon, 
when Rabbi Voorsanger united in marriage Miss Helen 
Rosenbaum and Hermann Lichtenfield, relatives of the 
bride and groom only being present at the ceremony, which 
was performed under an immense floral bell suspended in the 
archway of the parlors. A breakfast followed the nuptial 
blessing, and later in the day the happy couple departed 
for a honeymoon trip south. 

Among the weddings on the tapis is that of Miss Evelyn 
Reeves and Frank P. Taylor, which will be an event of the 
near future. 

Announcement has been made this week of the engage- 
ment of Miss Edna Van Wyck and Arthur Callaghan, whose 
wedding will take place before the year is much older. In 
the meantime the young couple are receiving the warm con- 
gratulations of their friends, of whom they have crowds in 
San Francisco. 



Cards have not of late been such a feature of the swim's 
entertainments as earlier in the season; still they are sand- 
wiched in between other affairs, and further on will come 
again to the fore. Last Saturday Mrs. C. E. Whitney enter- 
tained sixty ladies at a seven-handed euchre party, and the 
same day the Misses Emma and Jennie McMillan had a 
euchre party of twenty-one young ladies. 

Last Monday evening Mr. Winfield Jones gave a euchre 
party at his residence on Hyde street. Among those present 
were Mr. and Mrs. James Flood, Miss Jennie Flood, Mr. and 
Mrs. Follis, Mrs. Hall, Miss Bessie Ames, Mrs. Detrick, Allan 
Bowie and Dr. Harry Tevis. 

Few brides-elect have been so extensively entertained by 
their friends as the popular fiancfie of Lieutenant Crimmins, 
Miss Margaret Cole. Since the moment that her engage- 
ment was announced she has been fairly overwhelmed with 
invitations to luncheons, teas and dinners. Among her host- 
esses are numbered Miss Charlotte Field, Mrs. W. J. Dutton, 
Mrs. S. G. Murphy, the Misses O'Connor, Miss Elena Robin- 
son and Mrs. Cornwall, at whose dinner last Monday Mrs. 
Eleanor Martin had the distinction of being the only guest 
not a young person, which goes far to prove the popularity 
in which that lady is held by the younger set. 

One of the largest of recent dinners took place at the 
University Club last Thursday, when Mr. and Mrs. Eels had 
the members of the Yale Glee Club as guests of honor. The 
ether guests, numbering upward of two score, included all 
the buds of the season, many of the older belles and a few of 
our local beaux. After dinner came the concert at Metro- 
politan Hall, followed by the dance in Maple Hall. 

An elaborate dinner of the week had Dr. W. J. Younger, 
who is here on a visit from his present home, Paris, as chief 
guest, to meet whom his host, Br. Cool, invited twenty 
friends, principally members of the medical and dental pro- 
fessions.' The dinner took place at the Cool residence in 
Leavenworth street, and with such musical exponents as 
Dr. H. J. Stewart and Donald de V. Graham present it is 
needless to say that music was a prominent part in the after- 
dinner festivities. 

There have been so many "at homes" since January began 
that our matrons and maids are being kept busy nearly 
every day in the week. Among the most largely attended 
were those of Mrs. Henry Scott anu Mrs. Allen. 

Mrs. H. L. Van Wyck's cards are out for teas on the third 
and fourth Fridays in January. 

San Francisco society is always glad to welcome additions 
to its ranks, especially if they are likely to prove acquisi- 
tions, and that is what 'tis said the new president of the 
Southern Pacific, Mr. Hays, and his family are sure to be. 
They arrived last Saturday and are at present at the Palace, 
and the fact of there being four daughters in the family is 
a subject for congratulation with our younger set, there 
being buds, present and in embryo, which means lots of 
entertaining for an indefinite period to come. Mr. Hays has 
already been proposed for membership at the Pacific-Union. 

Mrs. John Boggs had for her holiday guests her son and 
his wife, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Boggs, and their wee daughter, 
her first grandchild, who, it goes without saying, was the 
pet of the entire household. 

The Ahearn Folgers are looked for in a couple of weeks, 
and will be accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Le Grand Tibbetts. 

A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 

R. T. FELIX QOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
troth Patches, Hush and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and delies detection. It has stood the 
test of 51 years and is so harmless we 
tiisteittobo sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of si mihir name. 
Dr. L. A. Hayre Bald to ft lady of the 
haut-ton (a patient): "As you Indies 
will use them. I recommend 'Oour 
ami's CrcHin' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
by all drutrtrists and Fancy-eoods 
Dealers in the United StatcB, Canada* 
ii' d Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
87 Great Jones street. N. Y. 



D 




J.nmry 12. 1901. 



SAN rn»'. »CO NtWS LETTER. 



19 






terlng at r 
th>< north 
spring Whl 

old Isaon warm 

nta that the gueet Is always unwllltnc I 

Among th.- most talked* -nts of th.' ?• i?.,.n Is 

that of Miss Ethel Pinion. I anil Will Sherwood. He hns long 
been regarded as a girl-proof bachelor, but love will And a 
way. and the daughter of Henry P. Dtmond, i! 
will soon I inwbJIa ttal 

congratulations anent the announcement of th- . ng.u 

Encouraging news Is received from Mme. de Oulgne. who. 
owing to delicate health, Is spending the winter at Pasadena, 
which place seems to suit her to a charm. The t 
in the Payson family, much to the regret of her friends, 
deprived the swim of a season's bud In the person of the 
eldest daughter of the De Guignes, but she will make a 
notable addition to those who will come under that head ncit 
season. 

The Hotel Rafael at San Rafael still continues to entertain 
a full number of guests, even in this, one of the poorest 
hotel months of the year. The tired San Franciscan knows 
that the Rafael is the most delightful, most accessible hotel 
for an outing, summer and winter; and a winter sojourn at 
San Rafael is becoming habitual among many of our well- 
to-do. 

Dr. and Mrs. Clyde Payne gave a dinner at their home In 
Geary street on Monday evening in honor of Dr. William J, 
■younger, formerly of this city but now of Paris. Among 
those present were Drs. S. E. Knowles, J. A. W. Lundborg, 
Thomas Morffew, Frank Piatt, Arthur Wallace, J. L. Asay, 
A. F. Merriman, Clyde Payne, Calvin Knowles, W. J. 
Younger, W. A. Bryant, Redmond Payne and M. Levkowitz. 

Mr.and Mrs. William M. Bunker, who were the guests of 
Professor and Mrs. Edward Booth for the first few days 
after their arrival from abroad, have this week taken apart- 
ments in the Hotel Bella Vista. 



It has been notable during the recent cold spell that none 
of our old Californians have been among those carried off 
by pulmonary diseases. This is perhaps largely due to 
the fact that the old Californian, in ninety-nine times out 
of a hundred drinks whiskey when he drinks at all. Hale 
and hearty are these pioneers to the last. No fancy drinks 
tor them; just the good old whisky of the South, aged in 
the wood and mellow of flavor and soft as oil to the tongue. 
Shea, Bocqueraz & Co. make a specialty of fine whiskies. 
Their "Teacup" is a rare old brand of Bourbon, and they 
are also agents for Kentucky Taylor whisky, a brand that 
grows in popularity day by day. Shea, Bocqueraz & Co. are 
one of the old time firms, whose record has always been one 
of honorable dealings and whose reputation is held in high 
esteem by the trade up and down the Coast. About two 
years ago, owing to the increasing business, they moved 
from less desirable quarters to the present ones at 525 
"Market street. 



The tendency of naval developments In recent years 

has been unfavorable to efficient action on the part of the tor- 
pedo craft, which would be detected by the powerful search- 
lights of me battleships and cruisers and destroyed by their 
quick-firing guns long before they could approach near 
enough to discharge a torpedo with effect. Such, states the 
United Services Gazette, are the lessons of the naval man- 
euvers recently carried out in America and of the repeated 
feigned attacks made by flotillas of torpedo craft upon our 
own harbors during the past year. 



THE CHALLENGE EXPLAINED. 

It has been reported to the Pattosien Co.. that some of their com- 
petitors claim that this large furniture and carpet house don't sell 
allot their stock cheaper than others. The Pattosien Co. refutes 
this statement; they therefore organized this great Challenge Hale. 
Besides their already low prices they reduced the entire stock from 
15 to 30 per cent. The business done by them since the opening 
challenge sale is wonderful. It is no wonder, when fine Mo.|iiette 
carpet is selling at 95 cents per yard and good Brussels Carpet 45 
Cents at 16th and Mission streets. 



-g 1 VinUgt will not be in your marktt until 
APRIL >. t<>0l. 






jbkctsirfi 




Full Quart Bottles . . $1.25 
One Gallon Jugs . . ♦ 3.80 
Half Gallon Jugs . . 2.00 
Twice its price will buy none better. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Belcher Silver Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works — Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, hold 
on the third day of January, 1901, an assessment, (No. 67) of Ten cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately in United States gold coin, to the secretary, at the office of the 
room 37, third floor. Mills Building, corner Bush and Montgomery street", 
San Francisco. Cal, 
Any stock upon w hich this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 6th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1901. 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is mode before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 27th day of 
February, 1901, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F, E. DIETZ, Seoretary. 
Office — Room 37, third floor Mills Building, northeast corner Bush and 
Montgomery Sts.. San Francisoo, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, California; location 
of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey county. Nevada. 

Notice 1b hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 28th day of December, 1900, an assessment (No. 35) of Ave cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States gold coin, to the secretary at the office of the com- 
pany, room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
1st DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1901 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 21st day of Febru- 
ary, 1901 to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

A. W. HAVENS. Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco. Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment »■ No. 36 

Amount per share ..5 cents 

Levied December 28, 1900 

Delinquent in office January 31, 1901 

Day of sale of delinquent stock ■ ■ February 21, 1901 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office: Room 57, Nevada Block, 3fi9 Montgomery St., S. F. Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Gould & Curry Sliver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 93 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied December 4, 1900 

Delinquent In office January 7, 1901 

Day of sale of delinquent stock January 28, 1901 

ALFRED K. DURBROW. Seoretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT CO. 



Proprietors 



Fifth floor. Mills Building San Francisoo 



Bitumen Mines 



Santa Oruz and King City. 
Monterey county, Cal. 



Contractors lor all kinds of street work, bridges and railway construotio n 
wharves, jetties and sea walla. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 




Stolen From Thieves. 

In the course of the terrible march of the Irish Fusileers 
from Dundee to Ladysmith the men were much fatigued, 
owing to tne rough journey. One man in particular stumbled 
along as if walking in his sleep. An officer passed. "Sir," 
said Michael, "what country is this we're marching over?" 
"The Natal table-land, my man," was the reply. "Bedad, 
sir," said Michael, "I think the table's turned upside down, 
and we're walking over the legs of it!" 

"I wish I were yon star," he said dreamily. "So do I," she 
returned promptly, heroically swallowing a yawn. "And 
why, dear one?" he asked impulsively. "Why do you wish I 
were yon brilliant orb?" "Because," she replied, in cold, 
matter-of-fact tones, "because yon brilliant orb is just 11,760,- 
971 miles away." And he faded silently out like a mist be- 
fore a summer sun. 

"There is one thing I am afraid of in connection with the 
Kruger craze in Paris." "What is that? War with Eng- 
land?" "No; I'm afraid those wild Parisians will try and 
force the Kruger style of hat on the world." 

Hoorihan — "The noight afther the battle me and me com- 
pany marched forty-three miles." Kerrigan — "Goan wid ye! 
Ye couldn't thravel that far in one noight!" "That's where 
ye don't know, Kerrigan. We wint cross lots!" 

Dashaway — Did you see that statement about me in the 
papers?" Cleverton — "Yes; a lie, I presume." Dashaway — 
"No; the worst of it is that it happens to be true." Clever- 
ton — "Well, you are all right, old man; no one will know it." 

Professor — "You wish your daughter to take lessons on the 
piano. Has she any aptitude for it?" Proud Mamma — 
"Wonderful talent, sir; there are very few operators who 
can equal her speed on the typewriter." 

"Seems to me I've met you somewhere, sir. I can't recall 
your name, but I'm sure I've been in your company before." 
"I think not, sir, but you know best. I'm the keeper of the 
House of Correction." 

St. Peter — "There is an 'X' marked opposite to your name; 
can you explain that?" O'Toole — Most likely that's thim 
ten dollars Oi borried from Misther O'Grady." 

Travelei — "Can we have beds here to-night?" Obliging 
Hostess — Oh, yes, sir." Traveler — "Have you — er — any — 
er — insects in this house?" Obliging Hostess — "No, sir; but 
we can get you some." 

Customei — "Haven't you a restaurant in the building?" 
Floor Walker — "Yes, madam; sixth floor, front. Regular 
dinner, 49 cents; marked down from $1." 

Father — "I take it you called to see Lucy." Lover — "Well, 
I — er — a — u'm — " Father — "Exactly. That's what I said 
when I was asked a similar question twenty-five years ago." 

"I never said anything to make your cousin mad." "Well, 
she didn't get mad for nothing." "I only said that I could tell 
by her face that she was an artist." 

Teacher — "How many voyages did Columbus make?" 
Pupil — "He made four, ma'am." Teacher — "Correct; and 
after which of them did he die?" 

"Sir Tommie Lipton is after the America's Cup again." 
"Well, he has nerve." "It takes nerve to be a great adver- 
tiser." 

"That," said the big country cousin, "happens to be a baby 
bull." "Oh, yes; that's what you call a bull pup, isn't it?" 



PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A sovereign remedy. One dose will cure a cough. It never 
fails, 'iry it. Price, 25 cents. George Dahlbender & Co., 
214 Kearny street. For sale by all druggists. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper irformation, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country Tel. Main 1042. 



BANKING 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital, 82.000.000 Surplus. 8l.000.000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, October 1.1900. 83,514,068.82. 

WILLIAM ALVORD .President I CHARLES R. BISHOP. Vlce-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. PRENTISS SMITH Ass't Cashier I I. P. MOULTON 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— Messrs. Laldlaw & Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore— The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago — Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Parts— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Dlsconto Oesellschaft. China, Japan, and East IndleB — Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit issued available in all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 

Deposits July 1. 1900. 826,952,875 Reserve Fund 8218.593 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 439,608 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen. Thomas Magee, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, Jacob 
Barlh, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo X Go. Bank 

N. E. Coe. Sansome and Suttee Sts. 
JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH. Cashier 

HOMER S. KING. Manager F. L, LBPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

IL L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Capital. Surplus and Undivided Profits Dec. 31,1900 $8,620,223.88 

Branches— New York City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier; Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly, Cashier: Portland. Or., R. M. Dooly. Cashier. 

DDSECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Christeson, Oliver Eldrldge. 

Henry E. Huntington, Homer 8. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook. 

John Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALD70RNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 18,203,559.17 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000 900 00 

Deposits Dec. 31. 1900 29.589.884.13 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker: First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President. H. Horstman: Cashier, A. H. R 
Schmidt: Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. StHnhart. E. Rohte H. B. Rubs, N Ohlandt, John Lloyd, and I. N 
Walter. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81.000.000. Paid Up Capital 8300,000 

James D. Pbelan, President S. G. Murpby. Vice-President 

Geoeoe A. Stoey, Cashier John A. Hooper. Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper, James 
Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neai, James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo <fc Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building Z< Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed Capltal..8l0,000.000 Profit and Reserve Fund... 8210,000 
Paid-in -Capital 1,500.000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help Its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent. Interest on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office — 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Cobbin. Secretary and General Manager 

Crocker-Woolworth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital $1,000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kline, Cashier 

W, E. Brown, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr.. A««lstant Cta»hter 

Directors— W. H. Crocker. E, B. Pond, W. E Brown. C E. Green. <;. \\ 
Kline. HenryJ. Crocker. G. W. Scott. 



January 12. 1901. 



SAN r- .•■■.<-. I »CO NEWS LETTER. 



21 




IF YOU COULD KNOW. 
(Mabel A. Rundell. In The OoamopollUn. | 

it you could know the half of all I yearn to be to you. 

Heart: 
Each day that dawns I struggle to he strong and do m> 
Yfi when at last the night comes softly down. 1 dumbly 

pray— 
Lord, grant me still to prove my tender love, just one mere 

day. 

Just one more day to strive to rise above small troubles, 

petty care. 
That my cramped soul may break its earth-forged bonds, at 

last to dare 
To face the future and to gladly live with courage new. 
Loyal and cheerful, facing toward the light for Truth and 

you. 

And yet 1 feel, in spite of all the heights which I can never 

scale, 
In spite of all the many tests in which I daily fail, 
That my deep love, more deep and purs and strong than I 

can ever show, 
\oa somehow, through my failures, doubts and fears will 

come to know. 
The dreary clouds can't hide the sun for aye — it glimmers 

through; 
The sweet wet violet, struggling through dead leaves, still 

shows its blue; 
And so I trust, though oft I strike love's chord with clumsy 

hand, 
You'll feel the melody I tried to play, and understand. 



FAREWELL, REMORSE. 

(Edith J. Hulbert, in Harper's Monthly.) 
Fareweil, Remorse! Why should I heap 
Ashes upon my head, and weep 
Vain tears, with only thee as guest 
Within these halls, wLere Beauts, Jest, 
And Song their court were wor.t to keep — 
Where oft with rosy feet did creep 
The dawn while revels banished sleep? 
Now get thee hence — I fain would rest. 
Farewell, Remorse! 

No? Well, though Pleasure's path be steep, 
And swollen at its foot rolls deep 
The stieam of Death, the way is blest 
With flowers; and gladly I tr.e quest 
Renew, and hold thy warnings cheap. 
Farewell, Remorse! 



SYMPATHY. 

(A. I.. Knowles. in The International.) 

From heart to heart I went and gently knocked, 
Seeking a quiet place wherein to rest, 
But none would open to so strange a guest, 

And fast with bolt and bar each door was locked. 

Some from an upper window leaned and mocked, 
As unknown merchandise I on them pressed, 
And asked for sympat' y — a bold request 

From one in seeming garb of motley frocked. 

Shut out, T heard the hour of midnight toll, 
When wide a palace door was flung, and he 

Who dw-3lt therein came forth with kingly dole 
Of his heart's best, and drew me silently 

Into the golden chamber of his soul, 
As he wculd honor one of like degree. 



BANKING 



London and San Francisco Bank. m»m. 
vi rroaxu vmtstr. 

Hit Vr» OKFH I "I I "tiihm-1 «tr- 

CaplUtl Authorised. SftJO I ftpllnl Paid ITp.fl.i 

I>lrt»CtMr* Hi i, i hmrm it. I ■ ard HrtMhm- 

loo, London; "hrUtt.t. da riuigne. H*n Kt»i«I«o.i; CharlM Hemerr. 

London; John I . Ho dti Koppali London Nor* 

mjiii D. Ki'lr-'ut. 8ui rthttf Itanrarar, Loudon* 

Inspector of BmnchWi UmUv Frfederleh. 
AiunUln New York, If r«T«. J . P, Mnrgnn A I 

BftAKCRBS; Portland, Omgons Tnootan, VfMlhlnnl 

LtUtra of oredll i turd MvAllnhlc for traveler* and the pilllltlll »t IIW 
eh*iHll*c In tiny city <■( the world Deal In foreign and domestic eichnnge 
Account* of country bank* received. Term* on application. 

W. Mai KlNTn-n. Mnnrnrcr 

Bank of British Columbia 

S, K. cor. Bush and Sausome Sts. Incorporated by Royal Charter. t*»2. 

HEAD OFFICE: 60 Lombard St., London. 

Capital Paid Up. S3.000.000. Reserve Fund. 1600,000 

BRANCHES-- Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops. Nnnl- 
amo. Nelson Rossland, Sandon, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This hank transacts a general hanking business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to check, and special deposits received. Commercial credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advances 
made on (rood collateral security. Draws direct at current rates upon Ita 
head office and branches, and upon its agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago — First National Bank: 
Liverpool — North and South Wales Bank; Scotland — British T.lnen Com- 
pany : Ireland — Bank of Ireland; Mexico — London Bank of Mexl 'o; Sotth 
America— -London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and Japan— 
Chartered Bank of India. Australia and China; Australia and New Zea- 
land — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
Ld.; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other banking 
business. Terms upon application. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 82,500,000 Paid-Up Capital. S2.000.000 

Reserve Fund, 8925,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard FrereB A Cie, 17 
Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' CredltB issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. C. ALTSCHTTL. Managers. 
R. ALTSCHTJL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and SanBome Sts., San Francisco 
Jas. K. Wilson. President Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, 8500,000 

DIRECTORS— James K. Wilson, Win. J. Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope, H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce. C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Dr ex el & Co.; Chicago—Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes &, Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, 81,000,000 Pald-TJp Capital and Reserve, 8375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, Arms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on tettst deposits and savings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Board of Directors — Ernst A, Denicke, F. Kronenberg, J. O. Rued, F, 
O. Slebe. Albert G. Wleland, H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp. H. Brunner. 

Officers — Ernst A. Denicke, President: F. Kronenberg, vice-President; H. 
Bninner. Cashier 

Tke Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized 86,000,000 Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund... 700.0C0 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 
IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LLTJENTHAL. Managers. 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomery St., Mills Budding. 



Interest paid on deposits. Loans made. 

DIRECTORS. 

William Alvord S. L. Abbot, Jr. 

William Babooek O. D, Baldwin 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones 



H. H, Hewlett 
E. J. MoOutohe 
R. H. Pease 



22 

John J. VALENTINE. President, San Francisco. 
Geo. E. Gkay, First Vice-President, San Francisco. 
DUDLEY Evans, Second Vice-President, New York. 
NATHAN STEIN, Secretary, San Francisco. 
H, B. PARSONS, Assistant Secretary, New York. 
HOMER S. King, Treasurer, San Francisco, 



Office of the President. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 




San eF?;cuvci:>co, 'Dece'm&er 31, 1900. 



Dear Sir : The following is our Annual Report of Precious Metals produced in the States and Territories west of the 
Missouri River (including British Columbia and Yukou Territory), during 1900, which shows in the aggregate : Gold, 
199,100,733; Silver, $42,402,502 ; Copper, $69,752,284; Lead, $18,059,908 ; Total gross result, $229,315,427. The "commercial" 
value at which the several metals named herein have been estimated is: Silver, 61 cts. per oz. ; Copper, 16 cts. .per lb.: and 
Lead, $4.37 per cwt. 

Allowance must always be made for probable variations from reported figures, by reason of constantly increasing 
facilities for transporting bullion, ores and base metals from the mines outside of the Express and the difficulty of getting 
entirely reliable data from private sources. Estimates obtained in this way are liable to be exaggerated and are, to a 
considerable degree, guesswork ; but with some modifications on this account, made herein, the general results reached, 
while only approximately correct, may be accepted as the closest approximation possible under the circumstances. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



Gold Dust and Bul- 
lion by Express. 



California 

Nevada 

Oregon 

Washington 

Alaska 

Idaho 

Montana 

Utah 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Dakota 

Texas 

Wyoming 

British Columbia and Yukon Territory . 



Total $83,373,333 



$12,383,269 

1,638,230 

1,246,564 

280,487 



Gold Dust and 

Bullion by Other 

Conveyances. 



2,150,000 

5,064,150 

2,H8,233 

27,175,000 

353.270 

1,361.570 

6,150,000 

3,000 

75,000 

23,344,56o 



$ 2,038,366 

1,169,283 

1.053,050 

56,462 

6,949,244 



Silver Bullion 
by Express, 



202,948 
5I4.5IO 
131,420 
165,353 



2,II5,l8l 

607,224 
1.393.590, 



345.000 



$15,727,400 



14 



672,013 
370,000 
183,538 
960, 500 
112,004 
63,1,840 
140,000 
195,300 
II.OOO 
750,000 



$35,040,426 



Ores and Base 
Bullion by Freight. 



$ 3,766,171 

38l, 9H 

5,000 

173,848 

136,066 

5,824,787 

42,474,000 

13,172,426 

5.780,730 

2,277,047 

17,819,029 

75.000 



85,000 
3,203,250 



$95, I74,26S 



* 18,390,754 

3.703.937 

2,436,034 

676,150 

7,085,310 

11,646,800 

57,908,150 

I7,6l9,37S 

47,916,230 

3,349,545 

21,206,029 

6,365,000 

198,300 

516,000 

30,297.810 



$229,315,427 



Tne gross yield for 1900, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows : 

Gold 43.21 $ 99,100,733 

Silver 18.49 42,402,502 

Copper 30.42 69,752,284 

Lead 7.88 18,059,908 

Total $229,315,427 

The year's combined product of the metals herein treated of, is the greatest in the historv of the Countries— United States of America and 
British Columbia and Yukon Territory — that of gold, $99,100,733, being above any previous record o'fficiallv reported ; but the world's output of gold 
for 1900, approximately $236,000,000, shows a decrease of about $6S,ooo.r,oo from last year. Australasia decreased $6,000,000, while the Boer war was 
the cause of falling away of the product of South Africa. The British Possessions of the Northwest increased $6,000,000 and the Uoited States 
of North America about $3,000,000. 

ANNUAL PRODUCTS OF LEAD, COPPER, SILVER AND SOLD IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES WEST OF 
THE MISSOURI RIVER, INCLUDING BRITISH COLUMBIA AND YUKON TERRITORY, 1870-1900. 



Year. 



1S70. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873- 
1874- 
1875- 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
18S1. 
1SS2. 
1883. 
18S4. 
1885. 
1 886. 
1887. 



1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 

iS93- 
1894. 

1895. 
1896 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 



Product as per W. F. & Co. 
statements, iucluding 
amounts from British 
Columbia and Yukon 
Territory. 



Product after deduct- 
ing amounts from 
British Columbia 
and Yukon Terri- 

/'■' v. 



$ 54,000,000 

58,284.000 

62,236,959 

72,258,693 

74,401,045 

80,889,057 

90,875.173 

98,421,754 

81 154,622 

75.349501 

80,167,936 

84,504,417 

92,411,835 

90,313.612 

84,975,954 

90,181,260 

103,011,761 

104,645,959 

114,341,592 

'27,677,836 

127,166,410 

118,237,44! 

I". 53 1 . 7oo 

104,081,591 

105,113,489 

118,164,642 

126,289,536 

153.435,469 

177,022,666 

203,541,907 
229,315,427 



$ 52,150,000 
55,784,000 
60,351,824 
70,139,860 
71,965,610 

76,703,433 

87,219,859 

95,811,582 

78,276 167 

72,688,888 

77.232,512 

81,198,474 

89,207 549 

84,639,212 

81,633,835 

87,3>'.3S2 

100,160,222 

I0 3,327 77o 

112,665,569 

126,723,384 

126,804855 

11 7. 946, 565 

in. 259,508 

103,827,623 

104,844,112 

117,896,98s 

!2I, 949.536 

142,853,469 
159.359 466 
179. 678,966 
199,017,617 



The Net Products of the States and Territories west of the Missouri River, exclu- 
sive of British Columbia and Yukon Territory, divided, are as follows : 



$ 1, 080,000 
2,100,000 
2,250,000 
3.450,000 
3,800,000 
5,100,000 
5,040,000 
5,085,250 
3,452,000 
4,185,769 
5,742,390 
6,361,902 
8,008,155 
8,163,550 
6,834,091 
8,562,991 
9,185,192 

9,631,073 
11,263,630 

■4,593.323 
'[.509.57I 
12,385,780 
'1,433.947 
7,756,040 
S.223,513 

7.170,367 
6.536,026 

8,775.144 
11,894.251 
13,667,248 
16,552,408 



$ 898,000 
1,195,000 
4,055.037 
5,683,921 
6,086,252 
7,838.036 

9-276,755 
10,362,746 
18,261,490 

14,793,763 
20,569,092 
13,261,663 
■9.370,516 
23.63'. 339 
22,276,294 
27,052,115 

28,713,305 
36,388,694 
45,897,648 
58.849,994 
68,056,534 



$17,320,000 
19,286,000 
19.924,429 
27,483,302 
29,699,122 

31.635,239 
39,292,924 
45,846,109 
37,248,137 
37.032,857 
38,033,055 
42.9S7.613 

48,133.039 
42,975,101 

43,529.925 
44,516,599 
52,136,851 
50,833,884 
53,'52,747 
64.S08.637 
62,930,831 
60,614,004 
50.607,601 
38,491.521 
28,721,014 
35.274.777 
33.6S4.963 
34,034,034 
35,081,365 
34,594,498 
38,652,502 



$33,75o,ooo 
34.39S.000 

38,177,395 
39,206,558 
38,466,488 
39,968,194 
42,886,935 
44,880,223 
37.576,030 
31,470,262 
32,559,o67 
30,653.959 
29,011,318 
27,816,640 
25,183.567 
26,393,756 
29.561,424 
32,500,067 
29,987,702 
32,527,661 
3i,795,36i 
31.685,118 
29,847,444 
33.948,723 
45.623,291 

48,399.729 
53,015,242 

63,655,597 
66,486.202 
72,567,226 
75,756,173 



The exports of Silver during the past year to Japan, China, the straits, etc., have been as follows: 
Francisco, $9,434,690- Total, $62,525,723, as against $39,886,795 last year. Pounds Sterling estimated at $.(.8665. 



From London, $53,091,03;; from San 



January 12. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



^fuiLv Sl-cito of ^KcjcIco. 



STATKMItvr OK THK PR. 






?i 



I878 

1S79 

|879-|8So 

■ 880-I881 

l88l-l8&l 

1S8J-1SS3 









iSSS 

1889 

i'-^9-i>9o 

1890-1S91 

1891-1892 

1892-1S93 

1S93-1894 

1S94-1895 

1895-1896 

1S96-1897 

1S97-189S 

1898-1S99 

1899-1900 



Total . 



i :;.ooo 

956,000 

<;,ooo 

1,02' 

1,04] 

1,031,000 
t|0|0, 

1,100,000 
1,150,000 

I.. '75, OOO 
I.400.COO 

1,4*5 

4.750.000 

5.475 
8,500 000 
9 925,000 
IO,l 12.000 

9.750.000 



.5,000 
33,226,000 

I2.O0O 

34,600,000 

34,912,000 

■I 1 . 5' ■ 

50,000 

48,500,000 

47,250,000 

54,225,000 

54.45o,coo 

60,6X3,000 

6?,5-\ 

65,310,000 

67,800,000 



166,451,000 I £970,138,000 



35.942 
41,} . 

42, fv 

■I 1.1 

47,025,0, O 
49.9" 

59,925.000 
69, i 8 3 . . .1 
77,450,000 
75,422,000 
77.55' 






EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OF COLO, SILVER AND COPPER, IN THK REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, 
FROM TPTF. 1ST OF JULY, 1S73, TO THE 30TH OF JUNE, I9C0. 



iS73-'874 • 
1S74-1S75 . 
1875-1876 . 
1876-1877 . 
1S77-1S78. 
1878-1879 . 
1879-1S80 . 
1880-18S1 . 
1SS1-1882 . 
18S2-1SS3 . 
1883-1884 . 
1SS4-1S85 . 
1S35-18S5 . 
1SS6-18S7 . 
1S87-1SS8 . 
1SS8-18S9 . 
1S89-1890 . 
1890-1891 . 
1 891-1892 . 
I 892- 1 893 . 
1893-1894 . 
1S94-1S95 . 
1895-1896 . 
1896-1897 . 
1897-1898 . 
1 898- 1 899 . 
1899-1900 . 



Total. 



GOLD DOLLARS. 



$866, 
862. 
809 

695 
691 
658, 
521 
492 
452 
407, 
328, 

423: 
425 

4 10; 

340, 

305. 
243, 
308, 

291, 

361, 

553, 
545, 
565, 
453, 
459. 

715: 

598 



743 
619 
401 
750 
,998 
,206 
,826 
068 
590 
,600 
,69s 
250 
.000 
000 
320 
,100 
,298 
000 
.94o 
,672 
978 
.237 
,786 

.474 
219 
882 
086 



SILVER DOLLARS. COPPER DOLLARS. 



$13,787,741 



$18,846,067 
19,386,958 
19,454,O.S4 
21,415,128 
22,084,203 
22,162,987 
24,018,528 

24,617,395 
25,146,260 
2J,oS3 92I 

25,377 379 
25,840,728 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 
25,274,500 
24,328,326 
24,238,000 
25,527,000 
27,169,876 
30,185,611 
27,628,981 
22,634,788 
19,296,009 
21,427,057 
20,184,117 
18,102,630 



$636,591,503 



$15,966 
21,712 
30,654 
9.035 
4t.364 
16,300 

14,035 

42,258 
1 1,972 



Summary. — Totals: Gold, $13,787,741 ; Silver, $6 36,591,5 03; Copper, $ 203,296. Grand Total, $650,582,540. 



$203,296 



EXHIBIT OP THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN I537 TO THE END OF THE 

FISCAL YEAR OF I90O. 



Colonial Epoch. 


GOLD. 


SILVER. 


COPPER. 


TOTAL. 




S 8,497,950 
19,889,014 

40,391,447 


$752,067,456 
441,629,211 
888,563,989 


$2O0;O0O 
342,893 


$760,765,406 
461,518,225 




929,298,329 


Independence. 


$68,77S,4ii 


$2,082,260,656 


$542,893 


$2,151,581,9130 




$ 557.392 
45,040,628 


$ 18,575,569 
740,246,485 


$5,235,177 


$ 19,132,961 
790,522,290 




Republic. 


$45,598 020 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


$809,655,251 


Eagle Coin, from 1st July, 1873, to 30th of June, 1900 . . 


$'3,787,741 


$636,591,503 


$203,296 


$650,582,540 



SUMMARY. 

Colonial Epoch— from 1537 to 1821, $2,151,581,960; Independence — from 1822 to 1873, $809,655,251 ; Republic— from 
1873 to 1900, $650,582,540. Total, $3,611,819,751. 




/^^^O^eS) 



President. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 



Southern Pacific Co.— Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[M tin Line. Foot of Market Street] 



leave] 



Feom January 1, 1901 



[arrive 



7:31a Benicla. Suisun, Elmira. Vaeavllle, Rumsey, and Sacramento.. 7:45 P 

7:30 a Davis. Woodland. Knights Landing. MaryBville, Oroville- 7:45 P 

7:30 a Atlantic Express, Oeden and East 12:15 P 

8:0-1 A Martinez. San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Callstoea, Santa Rosa..... 6:15 p 

8:00 a Niles, livermore, Tracy, Lathrop. Stockton 7:15 p 

8:3m a Shasta Express— Davis. Williams vfor Bartlett Sprlnes). Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland 7:45 p 

8:30 a San Jose, Livermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placerville. 

Marysvllle, Cbico, Red Bluff. 4:15 P 

8:30 A Oakdale, Chinese, Sonora, Carters 4:15 P 

9:00 A Haywards, Nilea, and way Btatlons 11:45 A 

9:1)0 a Los Aneeles Express— Martinez, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced, Fresno, and Los Aneeles 7:15 p 

9:30 a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 5:45 p 

ln;00 a The Overland Limited — Oeden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago 6:45 p 

11:00 a Niles, Stockton, Sacramento, Mendota, Fresno, Hanford. 

Visalia.Porterville 4:15 P 

11:00 a Livermore, Sanger, Goshen Junction, Bakersfleld, Los 

Angeles 

tl:00 P SacrBmento River Steamers t6:00 A 

3:00 P Haywards, Niles, and way stations 5:45 P 

4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa. Callstoea. Santa Rosa 9:15 A 

4:00 P Benicia, Winters, Sacramento, Woodland. Knight's Landing 

Marysvllle. Oroville 10:45 A 

4:30 p Haywards, Niles and San Jose t8:45 a 

5:00 p Niles, Livermore, Stockton. Lodi 10:45 a 

ff5:00 p Sunset Limited. El Phso. New Orleans and East cl0:15 a, 

5:00 P The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno, Bakersfleld, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara. Los Angeles 10:15 A 

5:00 p New Orleans Express — Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara, Los An- 
eeles, Demlng, El Paso, New Orleans, and East 7:45 a 

6:00 p Haywards, Niles, and San Jose 7:45 a 

t6:0u p Vallejo 11:45 a 

6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ogden. Cheyenne. Omaha, Chicago 12:15 p 

6:00 p Oriental Mail— Oeden, Denver, Omaha, Chicago 4:15 P 

7:00p Oregon and California Express, Sacramento, Marysvllle, Red- 
dine. Portland Pueet Sound and East 8:45 A 

8:05 PS.m Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez and way stations ll:4> A 

t8.-05p Vallejo 7:i5 v 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Footof MarketSt.) 

8:15 a Newark, Centerville, San Jose. Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 6:20 P 

t2:15p Newark, Centerville. San Jose. New Alroaden. Felton. Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations tl0:50 A 

4:15 p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 8:50 A 

09: 30p Hunters' Excursion, San Jose, and Way Stations 17:20p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market Btreet (Slip 8).— t7:l5, 9:00, and 11:00 
A.M. 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, p.m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— t6KK). J8:00. tS.05. 10:00 A. M. 12:00. 
2:00,4:00,»5:15P.M. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 



t6:10 A Ocean View, South San Francisco 

7 :00 A San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) 

9:00 a San Jose. TresPinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, 
Sun Luis Obispo, Surf , Lompoc. and principal way stations 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations 

11:30 a San Jose and way stations 

t2:45 p San Mateo. Redwood. Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, San 
Jose.Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove 

t3:30p San Jose and Way Stations 

+4 :15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 

T5:00 p San Jose, Los Gatos, and Principal Way Stations 

5:30 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 

6:30 p San Jose and Way Stations 

011:45 P San Jose and Way Stations 



t6:30 P 
1:30 P 

4:10 p 
6:35 a 
5:30 p 



fl0:36 A 
7:30 p 
9:45 A 
t9.-00 A 
8:35 A 
t8:00 A 
7:30 p 



A for Morning. p for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted. 

J Sundays only. Monday b. Wednesdays. Fridays. 

c Tuesdays, Thursdays, Sundays. 0- Saturdays only. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards andother 
information. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 




Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf, San FranctBco. 

For Alaskan ports, 11 a. H.: January 1. 6. 11, 16, 21, 
26, 31. Feb. 5. change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

ForB.C.and Pueet Sound Porte, 11 A. M„ Jan. 1,6.11 
16,21,26,31. Feb. 5. and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 P. M., Jan. 3, 8. 13, 18, 
23, 28. Feb. 2, and every fifth day thereafter. 
For San Diego, stoppine only at SantaBarbara, Port 
Los Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles). "Queen," Wednesdays, 9. a. m., 
Santa Rosa. Sundays, 9 a. m. 

For Santa Crux. Monterey. San Simeon, Cayucos. Port Harford, San 
Luis Obispo, Gariota, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Hueneme, San Pedro, East 
San Pedro, and Newport (Los Angeles), " Corona," Fridays. 9 a, m.; 
"Bonlta," Tuesdays. 9 a. m. 
For Mexican ports, 10 A M„ 7th of each month. 
For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change Bteamers. salllne dates, and 
hours of sailine, without previous notice. 
TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
G00DALL. PERKINS & CO.. Gen.Aets.. 10 MarketSt., San Francisco. 



■ 



7:20 A. M. LOCAL FOR FRESNO. BAKERSFIELD 
and intermediate points. 9 a. m California Limited, 
with Sleepers. Dining and Observation Cars to Kansas 
City and Chicago. 4:20 p. m. Local for Stockton. 8 p. m. 

|| Overland Express, with Palace and Tourist Sleepers and 

U Chair Cars San Francisco to Chicago. 



BROOKS-FOLLIS 
ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

527 Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Importers and Jobbers of EleCtriCSl SUDDlieS 

Tel. Hain 861. 

D r . icl-mic* For barbers, bakerB, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 
DlU o\ ICj tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners, 
dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundrleB, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, tallers, etc. 

Buchanan Bros., 

Brush Manufacturers, €09 Sacramento street. San Francisco. Tel. 5610 

C. A. Murdock & Co., PRINTERS.^* 

* No. 532 QLf\y STREET. 8- F. 

California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R*y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibubon Feeet— Footof Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30,9:00. 11:00 a. m; 12:35. 3:30, 5:10. 6:30 P. M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11 :30p.m. Saturdays— Extra tripsat 1:50 and 11:30 P. M. 
SUNDAYS— 3:00. 9:30, 11. -00 A. m.; 1:30. 3:30. 5:00. 6:20 p. M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10.7:50.9:20.11:10 A. M.; 12:45, 3:40, 5:10 p. m. Saturdays 

Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:35 P. M. 

SUNDAYS— 8 :10, 9:40, 11 :10 A. M. ; 1 :40, 3:40, 5*5, 6:25 P. M. 

Between San Francisco a nd Schuetzen Park, saxne schedule as above. 

Leave San Francisco I In Effect Nov. 7. 1900 | Arrive in San Francisco 



Week days I Sundays 



Destinations 



Sundays I Week days 



7:30 am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 



8:00 AM 

9:30 AM 
5:00 pm 



Novato 
Petal uma 
Santa Rosa 



10:40 AM 
6:05 PM 
7:35 pm 



8:40 AM 
10:25 AM 

6:22 pm 



7:30 am 
3:30 pm 



Fulton, Windsor. 

Healdsbure, Lytton, 

Geyserville, Cloverdale 



10:25 AM 
6:22 PM 



7:30 am 


8:00 am | 


Hopland, Uklah 


1 7:35 pm 


622 PM 


7:30 AM 
3:30 PM 


8:00 am j 


Guerneville 


1 7:35 pm 


1025 AM 
622 pm 


7:30 am 
5:10 pm 


8:00 am 1 
5*0 pm I 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


1 9:15 am 
1 6:05 pm 


8:40 AM 
622 pm 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 am I 
5:00 pm 1 


Sebastopol 


1 10:40 am 
1 7:35 pm 


10:25 am 
622 pm 



Staees connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Sprlnes and White Sulphur 
Sprlnes;at Fulton for Altruria; at Lytton for Lytton Sprlnes; at Geyserville 
for Skaees'Sprines;at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Sprlnes, Hiehland Sprlnes. Kelseyville, Carlsbad Sprlnes. Soda Bay, Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Sprlnes; at Uklah, for Vichy Sprlnes, Saratoea Sprlnes, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Witter Sprlnes. Upper Lake, Porno, Potter 
Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Lierley's, Bucknell's, Sanhedrln Helehts, 
Hullville. Boonevllle, Phllo, Christine Soda Sprlnes, Navarro, Whites- 
boro. Albion, Little River, Orr's SprlneB, Mendocino City, Fort Brace, 
Westport. Usal Wlllits. Laytonville, Cummines, Bell's Sprlnes. Harris, Ol- 
sen's. Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 

H. C. WHITING, Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass. Aeent. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m„ for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calline at Kobe (Hloeo), Naeasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Honekon 
with Bteamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Gablic (via Honolulu) Wednesday, January 16. 1901 

Doeic (via Honolulu) Saturday. Feb. 9, 1901 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, March 7. 1901 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Saturday. March 30, 1901 

Round Teip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market Btreet 

corner First. D. D. STUBBS. General Manager. 






SS "Australia." to Tahiti, Sunday, Jan. 6. lp.m. 
SS "Zealandia." Wednesday, Jan. 16. 2 p. m. 
SS "Sonoma," Wednesday, Jan. 23, nt 9 p. m. 
Line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africn. 

J. D. SPRECKKLS & BROS. CO.. 
Aeents, 6-13 Market Street. Freight office. 327 
Market St.. Sun Francisco. 



January 12. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO SEWS LETTER. 



.-". 



'She Very Young Doctor 

The rcrjr young doctor would 
amualnic If It WW« not that he la «o 
deadly. Nothing ran Ik- humorous In 
the I: f the word whl 

llablo at any moment to explode and 
blow the by. passer Into the middle of 
the next »• 

The very young doctor Is more no- 
ile in the average village than 

elsewh-Tc. he exists in the 

but there he Is generally 
squeezed out of his natural self by the 
ire of rivalry, or so nearly bur- 
ied under the avalanche of competi- 
tion, that he is not much in evi 
to the casual observer. 

In the village, however, he is to be 
found in abundance In a one-sided con- 
test with the old doctor. The young 
doctor thinks he knows medicine, and 
worships It as a great and mighty- 
science: the old doctor realizes that 
nobody knows it. but he knows human 
nature, and in his gruff but kindly 
way pities It. The young doctor is in- 
variably a "physician." and jealously 
guards the title, but the old doctor is 
commonly, and for his many good 
deeds secretly done, affectionately- 
called "Doc." When a very young 
doctor meets another very young doc- 
tor the surrounding atmosphere is 
darkened with the "Doctor, Doctor, 
Doctor" with which prefaces every 
sentence he addresses to the other; 
but when two old doctors foregather 
they pull at rank pipes and indulge in 
the few hearty laughs which come to 
men whose mission is to alleviate the 
miseries of their fellows. 

The very young doctor maintains an 
attitude of armed hostility toward the 
older practitioner and refers to him 
as an old fogy and a person upon 
whose moss-grown back a reindeer 
could feed and wax fat; but the old 
doctor, recalling the long-gone days 
when he was a young physician and 
optimistic and conceited, simply and 
silently regards the other as a popgun, 
and lets it go at that. A large library 
and an ornate office are held to be ne- 
cessities by the young doctor, and he 
loves to have many impressive-looking 
instruments and a row of bottles con- 
taining repulsive abnormalities to 
paralyze the unsophisticated visitor; 
but the old doctor's office is a den 



BROWN'S = ,L 

Fifty years of success prove these 
troches the simplest and best remedy 
for Coughs* Hoarseness, Bronchial 
and Lung Troubles. 

In boxem— never sold In bulk. 



containing a library that could be 
transported in a shawl-strap and looks 
like the Old Scratch. 

The very young doctor delights in 
operations and revels in horrid Latin 
diseases. The paramount point with 
him is not whether the victim of his 
zeal recovers, but that science shall 
be vindicated. He will joyously spoil 
a bushel of eyes or a squad of stom- 
achs for the sake of demonstrating 
that science is mighty and will pre- 
vail. But the old doctor, being a fogy 
come down from the time when there 
were no germs and microbes had not 
been invented, counting the triumph 
of science as immeasurably less than 
the alleviation of human agony, ap- 



and ti 

on In 

■i« n.r 

mined! 

• ti, k »l 

efforts prort 
draught or 1ml 



• llh dreml 
the 

A Pah 

i whi'. 

.n. trusting 

misters to Jar 



the patient Inl patholofti al 

condition which he la cOtDpotOOl to 

combat. 

Then Is, in his own ■ stlmntlon. only 
one thing that t! 

caonol do, and thai is to raise a 
beard. However, he leant! by con- 
stant experimenting th il the hair of 

the face can be Indi I to sprout with 

considerable umhrap' isl in 

front of the cars while yet the rest 
of a youth's (rontlsplece is a rapilari- 
less desert: and therefore he is gen- 
erally to be seen with wisps of gosling 
hair athwart his aurleulare. 

Do not deride the very young doctor, 
nor lightly insinuate as he comes 
pompousing down the street, clad in 
his mighty potentiality bis fuddy little 
side whiskers and the shiny tall hat 
and redundant frock coat which he 
considers vital to his professional 
standing, that he is dressed to kill — 
he may catch you in an extremity 
week after next, and sight you. 

Neither despise his innocent preten- 
sions, for when the pestilence, be it 
cholera or what not, breaks out, and 
strong men cower and mothers clasp 
their babes to their bosoms and sicken 
with dread, the very young doctor, 
fired with zeal to live up to the in- 
dorsements of his diploma and the 
daring which incites its possessor to 
rush in where angels fear to tread, 
will stand forth, with his nickel- 
trimmed medicine case, his idolatrous 
adoration of science and his ridiculous 
side whiskers, and, side by side with 
the old doctor, fight the demon of the 
plague through hopeless days and 
sleepless nights, and his silk hat will 
crown a hero or a martyr, just as 
Fate may have it written over against 
his name in the Great Book. 

And. by-the-bye, if he lives he will 
be the old doctor, with plenty of whis- 
kers, a crabbed mien and the record 
of having bestowed more benefits upon 
his fellow men. made more unnoticed 
sacrifices, and been more charitable, 
than any other man in the community. 
The very young doctor may some- 
times appear excuseless, but he has 
his mission. — Tom P. Morgan in Har- 
per's Bazar. 



Mrs. Talkyer — I saw Dr. Owsem go 
into your house this morning. Is any 
one sick? Mrs. Fanning — My husband. 
He just got home from his vacation. — 
Harper's Bazar. 



"Incurable Hearts" 
Quickly Cured. 

it\ the < hk ago Heart Spei lal- 

ist, Franklin Miles, M.D.LL&, 

Who Has Cured Hundreds 

of "Incurable Cases." 



That InoredoJoos persons m»y be convinced. 

rc\ rn <lityn' trial of a famous new treatment W II) 

- free tO LtlOM with W e*k or dlMMSSd 

bOUtS, whether OOmpltOated "f nut w itti 

in rvous, itooDMfa or drop*' trnuhiea. 

It in the re-ult "f B year*' SEP 

Patients tn overj State. Oaneda, Mi rioo. Borons). 
Afrit i Mid SonUi America Hundred* cured niter 

from live to twenty i>hyitUii« had «ivcn thorn 
HP 

Prof J. P. Bom, Iff. IV. President ol Basil 
Medloal Oollssje, Chlaseo, nrrott In 1874: 'Dr. 
Miles has taken two courses nf my j-nTa/*- In- 
struction in diseases of the heart." 

Ool. X. <;. Pitrkcr. cx-Tren-nirer 0. South C.iro- 

llns, says: ' l believe l>r. Miles t.- he nn atten- 
tive and sktHful physician In s Held whlofa re* 

quires the best nimltllc" of head and heart. " 

Sen for book, question blank, free AdvtoS and 
free treatment Address Dr. Franklin HUBS, 2»'l 
to 209 State -trect. Chicago. I'lcane mention 
this paper and describe your case. 



Hollis — What makes a man when he 
is engaged give the girl a diamond 
ring? Stoughton— The girl, I suppose. 
— Harvard Lampoon. 



"Babbert is an awful poor judge 
of whisky, isn't he?" "Yes, he inher- 
its it. He comes from a long line 
of druggists." — Life. 



^El^SONALllAGNETISM 



*»* 



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highest ambitions: to 
achieve; to accomplish; to 
win. It marks the difference be- 
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makes man the supreme master of 
his destiny. By our new system 
you can leam this wonderful 
science in a few days at your own 
home, you can cure diseases, bad 
habits and wield wonderful power 
and influence over others. Our 
richly illustrated book on Hypno- 
tism, Personal Magnetism, Mag- 
netic Healing, etc., tells bow. Ivh 
free. It is intensely interesting 
and full of startling surprises. It 
has been the means of starting 
thousands of persons on the road 
to success. A postal card dropped 
| 9> in the box at the corner will bring 
this wonderful book to your very 
door. Address, 

New York Institute of Science, jfJl 
Dent fli (J 7 Rocheater, N. Y. ajM 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 12, 1901. 



Statement of the Condition and Value 
of the Assets and Liabilities of 

THE HIBERNIA 

Savings and Loan Society, A Corporation. 

And where said assets are situated dated Dec. 31. 1900. 



ASSETS. 

1— Promissory Notes and ihe debts thereby secured, 

the aciual value of which is $22,304,265.12 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts is 
as follows: They are all existing Contracts, owned by 
said Corporation, and are payable ro it at its Office, 
which is situated at the Corner of Market, McAllister 
and Jones Streets, in the City and County of San 
Francisco, State of Califoraia, and the piyment there- 
of is secured bv First Mortgages on Real Estate with- 
in this State. "Said Promissory Notes are kept and 
held by said Corporation at its said Office, which is its 
principal place of business, and said Note3 and Debts 
are there s.tuated. 
2— Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, 

the actual value of which is 35,000.00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts 
is as follow* : They are all existing Contracts, owned 
by said Corporatiou. an tare payable to it at its Office, 
which is situated asaforesaid, and the payment there- 
of is secured by "Park and Cliff House Railway Com- 
pany 6 per cent Bonds," "Market Street Railway 
Company First Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent 
Gold Bonds." the market value of all said Bonds be- 
i li c .v,",2, 612 50. Sad Notes are kept and held by said 
Corporation at its said Office, and said Notes and 
Bonds are there situated. 
3— Bonds of the United States, the actual value of 

which is 21,173,597.83 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: They 
belong to said Corporation, and are kept and held by 
it in its own Vaults and are there situated. 

Tbev are "Reentered 4 per cent of 1907 ($18,000,000- 
.00) and 4 percent of 1925 ($1,000,000 00) and 3 per cent 
of 190S ($500 000.00) United States Bonds" and are pay- 
able only to the order of said Corporation. 
4— Miscellaneous B mds, the actual value of which is . . 3,701,514 58 
The condition of said Bonds is as follows: They 
belong to said Corporation, and are kept and held by 
it iu its own Vaults, and are there situated. They are 
"Market Street Cable Railway Company G percent 
Bonds ($979 0nii. 00 . ' Market Strfet Railway Com- 
pany First Consolidated Mortgage 5 per cent Bonds 
($2S7 000.00)," 'Sutter Street Railway Company 5 per 
cent Bonds ($150,000.00)." "Powell Street Railway 
Comp.my 6 per cent Bonds ($50,000.00)." "The Omni- 
bus Cable Company per cent Bonds ($82,000.00)," 
"Presidio and Ferries Railroad Company per cent 
Bonds ($25,000 00)," "Northern Railway Company of 
California per cent Bonds ($467,000,00)," "San Fran- 
cisco and North Pacific Railway Company 5 per cent 
Bonds ($327,000 00)," "Spring Valley Water Works 
First Mortgage <i per cent Bonds ($<W 000.00)." "Spring 
Valley Water Works Second Mortgage 4 per cent 
Bonds ($402 000.00) "Spring Vallev Water Works 
Third Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds ($533,000 00)," and 
"City of San Luis Obispo 5 per cent Bonds ($24,- 
750.33)." 
5— Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accrued to Janu- 
ary 1. 1901 76.3G6.56 

0— (a) Real Estate situated in the City and County of 
San Francisco ($033 845.09). and in the Counties of 
Santa Clara ($261,917.47), Alameda ($149,597.45) and 
San Mateo ($20,010.18), in said 8tate, the actual value 

of which is 1,074370.17 

(b) The land and building in which said Corpora- 
tion keeps its said Office, the actual value of which is . w.hik.wp 

The condition of said Real Estate is that it belongs 
to said Corporation and part of it is productive. 
7-Propirtion of Taxes for the Fiscal Year 1000-1901 

chargeable to next half year 34,501.55 

8— Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin, belong- 
ing to said Corporation, and in its possession, and 
situated at its said Office, Actual Value 1,607,735 »-> 

Total Assets $50,0i;ii,:;5<; 02 

LIABILITIES. 

1— Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and 

the actual value of which is $47,576,198.16 

The condition of said Deposits is that they are naya- 
able only out of said Assets and are fully secured 
thereby. 



2— Reserve fund, Actual Value 3,090. 15S 70 

Total Liabilities $50,606,356.92 



The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

By JAMES R. KELLY, President, 
fh? Hibernia Savings and Loau Society. 

By ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

State oi California. City and County or San FranciBco, ss: 

JAMES R. KELLY and ROBER I' .1. TOBIN, being each separately duly 
sworn, each for himself says: That said JAMES R. KELLY is President 
and that said ROBERT. I. TOBIN is Secretary of THE HIBERNIA SAV- 
INGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and that 
the foregoing statement is true. 

JAMES R. KELLY. President. 
ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before uie this 2d day of Januury, 1901. 

GEO. T. KNOX. Notary Public. 
In and for the City and County of San Francisco. Slate of California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 
For the six months ending December 31. 1900, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the Savings Department of this Company as follows: 
On Term Deposits, at the rale of three six-tenths (3 6-10) per cent per 
annum, and on Ord nary Deposits at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum, 
free of taxes, and payable on and alter Wednesday. January. 2. 1901. Divi- 
dends uncalled lor are added to the principal aud bear the same rate of 
dividend as the piir.cipal from and after January 1. 1901. 

J. DALZELL BROWN. Manager. 
California and Montgomery Sts.. Sin Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1900, a dividend has been declared 

ut the rate of three (8) per centner annum on all deposits, free of luxes, 

payable on and after Wednesday. January 2. 1901. 

GEORGE A. STORY. Cashier. 
33 Post street. San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held this 
day. a dividend has bee • declared at the rate of three and one-eight :' - 
per cent per annum o-> all deposits for the six months ending December 31. 
1900. free from all laxes, and payable <>n and afler January 2. 1901. 

December 28, 1900. ROBERT J. TOBIN. Secretary. 

Office— Corner Market. McAlli.-ter and Jones Sts.. San Franc isco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
Forthehalf year ending with December 31. 1900. a dividend has been 
declared at the rale of tiiree and one quarter (3%) per cent per annum on 
all deposils, free of taxes, payable on and after Wednesday. January 2, 1901 

GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office — 526 California street. San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Onion. 

For the half year ending with the 31st of December. 1900. a dividend has 

been declared at the rate per annum of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per 

cent, oil term deposits and three (3) per cent on ordinnry deposits, free of 

taxes, payable on and afler Wednesday. January 2, 1901. 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier. 
Office — 512 California St.. corner Webb St .. San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending December 
31, 1900. at the rate of three and one-fourth (3*4 i per cent per annum on all 
deposits free of laxc", and payable un and after January 2, 1901. Dividends 
not called for arc added to and hear the same rate of dividend as the prin- 
cipal from and afler January 1, 1901. 

CY'RUS w. carmany. Cashier. 

Office— 101 Montgomery St.. cor. Sutter St., San Francieco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association. 
For the year ending December 31. 1900, declared a dividend of 5pcrceul 
tier annum on ordinary deposit sand 6 per cent on term deposits. 

WILLIAM DOBBIN. Secretary. 
Office— 222 Sansome St.. Sail Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 

For the six months ending December 31. 19d0, a dividend has been de- 
clared upon Term Deposits at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per 
cent per annum upon Ordinary Deposits at the rate «f three (3) per cent, per 
annum, free of taxes, payable on and after Jauuary 2, 1901. 

S. L. ABBOT .la.. Secretary. 

Office: 2ii Montgomery street. Mills Buiiding. San Francisco Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crown Point Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — San Francisco. Cal. Location of 
works— Gold Hill. Storey county. Nevada, 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on Ihe 27th day of December 1900. an assessment (No. si) of live ccnta 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, pnyable Im- 
mediately in United States gold coin to the secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 35. third floor, Mills Building, northense corner Bush and 
Montgomery street. San KrancUco. California. 

Any stock upon which this assesement shall remain unpaid on 
THE 30th DAY' OF JANUARY. 1901. 
will be delinquent nnd advertised for sale at public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THUHStMY, the 20th day of 
February, 1901. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

JAMES newi.ands. beoretarjr. 

Office, Room 35. third floors, Milis Building, northeast comer of Bush aud 
Montgomery street, San Francisco California. 




A Study of Henry Miller 
As Sydney Carton 
Photo by Genthe. 



San Francisco News Letter, January 19, 1901. 



Price, per copy, 10 cent*. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 10, IMS. 

News i^nftrER 



wa 



- 



Annuel Subscription, I* 00 



(California AiVtxcrtisjer. 




Vol. LXII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 19. 1901. 



Number 3. 



Frinlr.l ami i.iihllshed rvtry Samrdiiv b] the proprietor, PR1 D 

MARRIOTT. Of Kearny street. s*n r .tered ataut 

dwo PostofHce aa sccond-claas metier 
Thorn. c..i the s P. MKWS USTTBR In London. Ene . is etaDOorahtlJ 

. Ixmdon. England. (Oc >r^-. - 
information may he obtained reeardinr subscriptions and advertising 
rates. Paris. France— Office, No 37 Aventn tie I.'Opern- 

All social Herat, announcement*, advertising or other matter. Intended lot 

publication In the current nmnher of the NBWS LBTTBS, -1 l.i I..- 

sent to this office not later than 6 v>. m. Thursday- 



The world moves, even if it doesn't progress. The vigi- 
lance committee which got away from San Francisco years 
ago is just making its bow before the good people of New 
York. 



Chinese exclusion acts in the United States are of small 
avail as long as the Dominion Government continues to admit 
Chinese emigration with no show at checking the yellow 
flood. 



Sir Harry Westwood Cooper, late of San Quentin, will 
pot be one of the Zimmermann-Birmingham party coming 
to this city. Sir Harry will wait for his hair to grow out be- 
fore rejoining the aristocracy. 



Prof. Michael I. Pupin of Columbia University has per- 
fected a great trans-oceanic cable telephone, thus enabling 
the hello girls of every land to join hands across the seas in 
a sisterhood of universal tyranny. 



No one is offering a $25,000 reward for the return of Prin- 
cess Chimay, who has been kidnapped. Her abductors, in- 
deed, should be rewarded by public subscription and in- 
structed to keep their troublesome victim securely hidden 
from the press for a period of eight days. 



Although Dr. T. G. Holmes and E. Milthrop of the trans- 
port Grant, were caught smuggling enough silk to warrant 
their consignment to the penitentiary, they are to-day at 
liberty to tell their friends how easily a United States 
uniform may shield a crime. 



In return for Galveston's tnanks to her sister cities for the 
aid extended to her in her day of misfortune, her sister 
cities bid her be of good cheer and build for herself a seawall 
that will make generosity on the one side and gratitude on 
the other unnecessary in the future. 



That was indeed a bitter shock to Elsie French when she 
was told that her wedding gown could not be made to exactly 
duplicate that of Queen Wilhelmina. So again is a good 
American robbed of the inherent national right of toadying 
to the symbols of royalty. 



If the News Letter were running the United States 
Government it would have a load of merchandise or sick 
soldiers to take the place of those seventy-four corpses 
aboard the transport Californian. Then the United States 
would not be bringing to her own shores a mute appeal 
against her own war of foreign conquest. 



The primative method in which the Boers deal with peace 
Commissioners disposes entirely of the theory that the 
burghers are anxious to come to terms. Shooting a mes- 
senger of peace comes dangerously near murder, as Dewet 
may find out to his cost some day. The fact is that the 
better class of Boers want peace, but the men left in the field 
are simply irreconcilable desperadoes. 



We»t Point is a queer place where bull-dozing and garage 
brutality nrc supposed ba ba part nnd parcel in the making 
of a soldier. That more has been done than the officers of 
the institution want known is pretty well proven by the 
hisses that greeted Congressman Drlggs when he became 
too Inquisitive for comfort. 



A son of the Sultan of Turkey has been threatened by an 
assassin. Fate is thoughtful. The Sultan can spare more 
sons than any other contemporary monarch. 

It is still a question as to who started the agitation In 
favor of masks at the Mardi Gras this year. The girl with 
the ugly face and the girl with the ugly morals are both to 
be considered. 



The press would not make Teddy Roosevelt a coward, even 
if he were. Before the hero of San Juan had been out hunt- 
ing three days he had saved a companion's life amid raging 
beasts galore. For next week's programme Teddy is billed 
to fight fifteen wild-cats, three mountain lions, and a grizzly 
bear, to ride an untamed buffalo and save the life of eight 
companions while shooting two six-shooters into the air 
and yelling "Viva la Cuba!" Such is the strenuous life of 
the Sunday supplement. 



Mr. Swiftwater Bill Gates has brought down from the 
North many of the good qualities of the gold-seeker, and 
among them a great love for justice. So he could not see 
the third of the Lamore sisters suffering for such a husband 
as himself when he had been so good as to marry the other 
two. Now that Bill has eloped with Belle, leaving Gussie 
and Grace in loneliness he should pause among the icy soil 
tudes of his retreat and reflect that there is one more of 
the Lamores to whom he owes a marital duty. The mother 
of the Lamore sisters has not had her turn yet at being Mrs. 
Swiftwater. 



E. A. Mizner of San Francisco is a fighting man, hegosh, 
and whether he spat in Ned Greenway's beer or not, it is 
comfortably certain that he threw a glass of wine in the face 
of Filbeck, an Alaskan sheriff, and that he acted with suffi- 
cient cause. With all due respect to our British cousins, 
Filbeck, surrounded by Englishmen, had small right for in- 
sulting American adventurers in Alaska as men "of the 
Soapy Smith variety." Mizner had just provocation to fight, 
as every good and brave Yankee has when he hears his 
countrymen insulted, whether it be in Alaska or Montenegro. 



Joaquin Miller should have thought twice before he pub- 
lished that hotel bill. He complains that he was over- 
charged at a Shanghai hotel, and in proof thereof furnishes 
us with an itemized account. The bard of the Sierras must 
have had a wholesome appetite, for his board cost him fifty 
dollars. On the other hand, by the exercise of judicious 
economy he spent just nothing at all on washing. This too, 
in the tropics, where a clean white suit is a daily necessity 
for the civilized man. Or is it that Joaquin prefers not to 
wash his linen in public? 



An old journalist like Stead should know better than to 
let himself be interviewed in France or anywhere else. 
The result has been that the London press now openly 
brands him as a traitor. Probably the journalist who wrote 
up the interview drew largely on his imagination, for he 
makes Stead say, "Depuis le deput de l'invasion je Le prie 
tous les jours pour que nous soyons battus." Even Stead 
with all his mental obliquity is hardly capable of praying 
publicly for the death of his countrymen. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 190i. 



BREAKING UP THE STANFORD CABAL. 

Because Ross, professor of economics and sociology at the 
Stanford University, saw fit in the course to a socialistic 
lecture before his class to indulge in a heated tirade against 
the manner in which he supposed fortunes were made, and 
especially against the methods by which large wealth was 
accumulated by the great and generous founder of the very 
university of which Professor Ross was an employe, drawing 
a large salary out of what he considers ill-gotten gains, and 
for which he was returning third-rate services that ought to 
have been dispensed with four years since, he was some 
time ago called to account by President Jordan and asked 
to change his line of declamation or resign. He resigned, 
and by a free use of the press has been doing whatever in 
him lies to break up the great university to which he pro- 
fessed to be devotedly attached. His claim is that in his 
person a blow has been aimed at "free speech." Well, it 
is sometimes a very good thing to aim a blow at. When it 
is made the paid and privileged vehicle of conveying false 
ideas to the youth of the country it should be allowed to go 
free — that is, it should no longer be provided with a privi- 
leged rostrum and a liberal subsidy, but be given a free leg. 
The country is wide and there are fields in it broad enough, 
in all conscience, for the free speech of any man. In New 
Jersey the socialists talk as they like, and even Johann Most 
finds attentive audiences in the great city of New York. 
The 7,000 socialists who voted in this State at the last 
election are for Professor Ross to a man. He should gather 
them together in one fold and, if they and he pay for it, he 
can, as far as the rest of the community are concerned, 
indulged in "free speech" to his heart's content- If the 
Trustees do not care to pay for his kind of talk at Stanford 
and parents do not care to have their sons and daughters 
listen to it, they are entirely within their rights in saying so. 
We do not believe that the man exists in California who 
wants to have the great university founded by the late 
Senator Stanford used for the purpose of villifying his 
memory. He could but leave half his fortune to the institu- 
tion because the other half belongs to his widow, who still 
survives him. Noble woman that she is, she has stripped 
herself of it in order to endow the university she and her 
husband planned. That Senator Stanford may have cher- 
ished the fond hope that some day future generations of 
educated Californians would rise up to call his name blessed 
is likely. Nobody can know better about that than she who 
so devoutly shared his hopes and aspirations and confidences 
during life. Is it to be tolerated that this good woman shall 
have her most sacred feelings lacerated during the few 
years of life she has yet to live, in the institution to which 
she has given all her means, and by a man who has been 
living on her bounty? Free speech, indeed! We pity the 
man or men so calloused to all the finer and nobler feelings 
of humanity who can stand up for speech that is brutal and 
infamous. Yet when Ross was given his dismissal and it 
was thought the only marplot was out of the way, three 
other professors whose names are not worth mentioning here 
began a game of intriguing and plotting in Stanford that 
bade fair to destroy discipline and bring the authorities into 
contempt. The president, David Starr Jordan, proved equal 
to the emergency, and now the three professors are out in 
the cold with their terribly sore heads exposed. No defense 
of any part of the life of the late Senator Stanford is neces- 
sary in this connection. The four great men who built the 
Central Pacific are all dead, but their works live after them 
and speak for them. Aye! and with an eloquence that no 
human pen could surpass. No four men who ever lived did 
more for the material interests of the country than they. 
They received some benefits from the Government, as the 
Government did from them. The only difference was that 
they repaid their loan to the last dollar and with usurious 
interest, whereas the Government never can recoup the 
Central Pacific for the services it has rendered. It is really 
pitiful and mournful at this late date that Senator Stanford's 
dollars should have gone to pay a pedantic, ill-mannered 
and shallow pedagogue to teach the youth of the State that 
their greatest benefactor was not worthy of respect, but o"f 
detestation. This mix-up in the college, attended as it is 
by all sorts of newspaper notoriety will not, as some genial 
pessimists have opined, killed the Stanford University. 
Rather it will tend to weed out a lot of scrubs that were 
better gone long ago. 



A NEW SCHEME OF WAGES. 

Superintendent George W. Dickie, of the Union Iron 
Works, famous as the man who built the Oregon, has come 
out with a brand new scheme for doing away with labor 
troubles by bringing employer and employed into thoroughly 
harmonious relations. It is obvious, from Mr. Dickie's posi- 
tion that his speech was merely a feeler thrown out to see 
whether the unions stand for the adoption of the plan of 
his iron works. A statement made in this semi-official way 
does not commit the company to anything; if the plan is 
well received, it can be put into operation, if not, it can be 
quietly buried, and nothing more said about it. Otherwise 
President Irving M. Scott would have made the announce- 
ment himself, instead of leaving it to a subordinate. The 
idea has much to recommend it, but as labor unions are pro- 
verbially obstinate and averse to the adoption of new meth- 
ods, some little fighting may be required before they can 
be induced to sanction it. As the result of a visit to England, 
Mr. Dickie has discovered a profit-sharing scheme which has 
proved a wonderful success, chiefly at the engineering 
works of Williams & Robinson, at Rugsby. It is neither pay- 
ment by time, nor piece work, but a combination of both. 
Experience has shown that, if a man is paid by time only, he 
aoes not perform the maximum of work. On the other hand 
labor unions object to piece work, because, in the hands of 
unscrupulous employers, it almost invariably degenerates 
into that most hateful of all arrangements, task work. The 
Rugby plan obviates both of these evils by placing a given 
value on each piece of work. If the mechanic, by striving 
hard, can make it for less cost, he shares the profit equally 
with his employers, if he is too slow, the loss is deducted 
from his earnings. In this way the workmen frequently 
double their wages, and on the average they increase them 
by sixty per cent. No wonder Mr. Dickie remarks that he 
never saw such a brisk lot of men anywhere, and no wonder 
the works have more than double the output of other similar 
establishments. The difficulty here would be to apply the 
method to the very technical and complicated operations of 
ship-building, but doubtless Mr. Dickie's ingenuity will be 
able to solve the problem, if he succeeds, our Californian 
workmen, with such stimulus, should be able to turn out 
our world-famous ships more quickly than ever. 



"A MISERABLE BLACKGUARD." 

Senator Teller is not esteemed a man of rash speech. He 
is a power in the Senate who makes for sobriety of language, 
and conservatism in action. Yet he committed himself the 
other day to the employment of words which, on their face 
would seem out of place in the Senate. He applied the term. 
"A miserable Blackguard," to a retired officer of the Army 
of high rank. The Army Reorganization bill was under 
consideration, and his remarks were germane to that ques- 
tion. He was supporting an amendment to prevent the 
future misuse of the retired list. It never was intended 
that that list should be used as a means of getting foul- 
mouthed, incompetent, or insubordinate officers off the active 
list. There was another and more fitting way of getting 
rid of military desperadoes. There was established a regu- 
lar systems of courts-martial, and a corps of official prose- 
cutors, known as Judge-Advocates-General. Such a court 
tried Brigadier-General Charles P. Eagan, commissary of the 
Army, for language unbecoming a fish wife, and used to- 
wards his superior officer, the commander of the Army, at a 
time when American and foreign attention was particularly 
centered upon our military. For this grossly scandalous 
conduct, the Court-Martial sentenced Eagan, in February 
of 1899, to dismissal from the service. No other punishment 
would have been commensurate with the offence. To the 
surprise and regret of the country, a weak and temporizing 
President, moved thereto by Ex-Secretary Alger, commuted 
this sentence to six years suspension on full pay. It became 
an actual reward instead of a punishment. To make matters 
worse, the President the other day restored Eagan to the 
active list, and immediately at his own request, retired 
him on three-quarters pay for life. Senator Teller's lang- 
uage was in effect an echo of the findings of the Court-Mar- 
tial and its use seemed necessary to recall the President to 
a sense of duty. His action in the premises is an insult to 
every officer who is on the retired list for meritorious 
reasons. That list has ceased to be a roll of honor. 



January 19, 1901. 



SAN FRVNCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



90ME INTERESTING FIGURES. 
The words, "wealth of California." fall to trippingly from 
>ngue. and wo are all ao arrustomed to their ute, that 
It may well bo dout • r many people roatli 

all that they stand for. Her* are some figures wtih 
tain a world of meaning. The products of our soil an 
marvellous In variety and value The total sblpn 
citrus fruits for the year 190001 Is estimated nt 
loads. In 1899 It was 18.400 carloads. The shlpm 
fresh fruits waybllled from Sacramento amounted to 64S& 

if compared with G8S9 cars In the real 
The output of raisins for 1900 Is eetlmal 
pounds: prunes. 120.000.000 pounds: [>■ 
pounds: apricots. 17.000.000 pounds: 
pounds: pears. 9.000,000 pounds: plums. 3,000.000 p 
nectarines. 400.000 pounds: dried grapes, 900,000 po 
figs. 5.500.000 pounds. The vintage for the year Is est 
at 14,000.000 gallons of dry wine; 5.000,000 gallons of 
wine, and 3.236.000 gallons of brandy. Canned fruits are 
estimated at 2.800.000 cases. The exports of wheat wan 
; centals: of dour 1,181,944 barrels. The total oil 
yield Is estimated at 4,000,000 barrels. Our dairy products 
for last year as compiled by the State Dairy Bureau, 
amounted to 816,493,272; or slightly more than one hall as 
much per annum all the mineral products mined are worth. 
There are now 317 creamery plants at work in the State, 
using 553 centrifugal milk separaters. California has 287 
banks, with resources aggregating 8387,302,285. The total 
bank clearings for San Francisco during last year were 
81,023,396,017, an increase over 1899 of $67,000,000. The 
mineral product of the State is estimated at $30,000,000 per 
annum of which $16,000,000 is in gold and $500,000 in copper. 
Our foreign commerce, largely on the shores of the broad Pa- 
foreign commerce, largely on the shores of the broad Pa- 
cific, amounted last year to $82,751,000. Of course this is 
a branch of our business that is only yet in Its infancy. The 
ocean that confronts us is so big with possibilities that no 
man to-day can set bounds to what the future has in store 
for this glorious State of ours. 



CONCERNING SCIENCE AND THE WEATHER 

President Howard of the Spring Valley Water Works says 
that the weather owes San Francisco about forty inches of 
rain on a balance of five years. It is a debt that will be 
paid, perhaps not this year, perhaps not next year, but it 
will be paid. There is nothing in the world so certain as 
the law of average, and this is perhaps the single scientific 
fact that meterology has established. In other respects it 
is a spurious science which has no other excuse for toler- 
ation than the salaries of the weather bureaucrats. A 
science may be defined or described as a well-established 
body of laws or truths by means of which T/e may predict 
the future course of events in certain circumstances. The 
weather bureau makes a specialty of prediction with the 
unhappy result of conspicuous failure. One day last week 
we were promised a hard frost and of course it came on to 
rain. If this were an isolated mistake it would be unimport- 
ant, but in fact it is the rule of weather forecasts. 

Nevertheless the law of averages holds In regard to the 
weather with the same certainty that it does in human af- 
fairs. The insurance companies can foretell with unfailing 
certainty how many clerks will rob their employees or how 
many men will commit suicide out of a given number. It is 
the same with fires and shipwrecks and other lines of busi- 
ness which have reduced prophecy to a commercial basis, 
an J it is on this law that the safety of our local water sys- 
tem rests. If we run short of rainfall for two or three years 
nevertheless, with the help of the scientific system of reser- 
voirs that has been created, the deficiency will be tided 
over without difficulty and the ultimate supply is assured. 



THE DEMAND OF THE POWERS CONCEDED. 
It looks at last as if some progess were being made in the 
settlement of affairs in China. The signing by Prince Ching 
and Li Hung Chang of the joint agreement prepared by the 
Powers is a notable event. Nothing quite like it was ever 
before extorted from a great nation. By its terms China 
is practically stripped of her sovereignty. Her capital is to 
be hereafter in the possession of foreign troops, her forts de- 
stroyed, Tientsin to be held, the railroad from the seaboard 
to Peking to he held in perpetuity by the Allies, and an 



I union* the Power* which will equal. It 
l hard to «. ■• what of real torer- 

I »rtar dyn , 

Itable In g-ood faith and with aa much grace 
'atbla, The ala] \mbaaaador 

lie met hi 
' i true slob "He hud done no wrong," 
b<- tall I : BO one pass to the pal- 

D whlrh tlr rating, nnd 

whon Von . i ,',| on horaaback i 

him to h.ilt. and when ha refused, killed him, as was his 
ran the point of view of a soldier ho was 
i. tht. and he certainly deterred a better fate. Those In 
higher authority, who gave him the orders ho fulfilled, are 
rtlcs who ought to have been held responsible. The 
Indemnities to tho various missionary societies, amounting 
ge sums, are being promptly paid by tho Chinese au- 
thorities, and the missionaries are being permitted to act as 
their own appraisers. Now the Joint note is signed, and that 
ought to be the beginning of the end. The Chinese will 
have been taught a lesson they are not likely to forget, 
and the Powers ought soon to leave them to their own re- 
sources. But will they? It is very much to be aoubted. 
It Is one thing to sign a note and quite another to re- 
it. It is quite certain that China cannot raise $600,000,- 
000 In gold coin at this time, but she has desirable property 
with which she can pay. That this will, to some extent, 
be parceled out among the powers seems more than likely. 



A BILL TO LEGALIZE QUACKERY. 

It is always safe to keep a suspicious eye upon all bills 
introduced in the Legislature professing to reform the pro- 
cedure relating to the admission of the would-be medicos of 
the period, to practice. There is money in the illegitimate 
pursuit of medicine, and many are the unconcionable rascals 
who follow it. Session after session they club their badly 
earned coin together, maintain a lobby at Sacramento, and 
manage to secure the services of some obscure member to 
introduce a bill whose real designs are invariably obscured, 
hut whose chief purpose is to break down the already too 
slight barriers which the law interposes against the practice 
of medicine by dangerous, and often criminal, charlatans 
and quacks. This sort of thing has gone on at Sacramento 
time out of mind. It is being attempted again this session, 
with what success remains to be seen. A cow country 
member, whose name we never heard of before, is the spon- 
sor for a bill to create one General Board of Examiners to 
grant or refuse diplomas at will. This Board is to consist 
of three members; one to be chosen by the Hahneman 
Medical College of San Francisco, one by the Blectic Medi- 
college of the same place, and one by the faculty of the 
Medical School of the University. The Hahneman, and 
Electic Medical colleges of this city are humbugs, not 
recognized by the medical world, and gotten up originally 
for the purpose of evading the law manufacturing quacks, 
and giving them a license to practice. On the proposed new 
Board there would be two quacks to one legitimate doctor, 
and the former would rule the medical profession of this 
State. It is a monstrous measure that should be indig- 
nantly kicked under the table on the first occasion on 
which it again makes its appearance. There are already too 
many criminal quacks plying their death-dealing calling in 
this city, and any legislation that is to take place should 
have for its object the lessening of their number and the 
making of their occupations extremely hazardous. Their 
shingles are up on every street, their double murders are 
of frequent occurrence, the police know who they are and 
what they are doing, but nobody pays any heed. The whole 
system of granting medical diplomas is vicious and bad. 
The doctor's degrees issued by the State University are 
based on no independent examinations, but are given to all 
students who can get from their teachers a certificate of 
competency. For a teacher to refuse such a certificate 
would be like confessing his own incompetency. Licensing 
physicians is a State matter, and should be controlled 
through the State University, which should have the appoint- 
ment of an examining body, none of whose members should 
he chosen from the medical faculty. President Wheeler is 
attending to many less useful things than procuring legis- 
lation on this subject. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 



LORD ROBERTS AND THE PORTUGUESE. 
When Lord Roberts was on his way home, the Portuguese 
authorities at Maderia, in response to instructions from Lis- 
bon, gave him a reception which could hardly have been 
surpassed if they had been honoring one of their own gener- 
als returning victorious from the wars. Salutes of nineteen 
guns were tired from the fort which commands the bay, and 
the authorities, after boarding the steamer Canada to offer 
their respects, held a reception later at the castle, and pre- 
sented Lord Roberts with an address of welcome. The oc- 
casion is principally worthy referring to, because it dis- 
closed the fact that the British and Portuguese governments 
are not only on the friendliest terms but have recently ce- 
mented that friendship by a new understanding. Something 
of the kind was needed. King Charles did Krueger more 
than a good turn when he so loosely permitted contrabands 
of war to pass through Lorenzo Marques to the Boers. Eng- 
land was under strong temptation at the time to sieze the 
Portuguese railroad as a war measure. If she had, the war 
would have been reduced to a comparatively small affair. 
But she forebore, landed her troops at Cape Town, content- 
ing herself with a protest against the use being made of 
Portuguese territory. Her hands were too full to give any 
excuse for European interference. By the conquest of the 
Transvaal, GreaCBritain is a next door neighbor to Portugal, 
and she might easily become an unpleasant one. But that is 
all settled now, as the speech of Lord Roberts clearly shows. 
He must, however, have forgotten Goa when he said, so far 
as he could remember the two nations had never been colon- 
.;.! neighbors before. As soon as peace is restored in South 
'-frica, the Portuguese will find that their revenues at Dela- 
i-oa Bay will benefit enormously by the occupation of the 
Transvaal by the British. The Field Marshall adroitly re- 
called the old comradeship in arms between Portugal and 
Great Britain, dating back to the time of the Black Prince, 
who, with his gallant company of English knights, rode in 
many a dashing foray through the valleys of Portugal in 
friendly alliance with Dom Pedro, and remaining unbroken 
down to the sterner struggle of the Peninsula war, where 
Wellington defeated the Marshals of Napoleon and drove 
them out of Portugal. Among the many and varied results 
of the Boer war, the new understanding with Portugal is 
but the first fruitage. More to the advantage of England 
will follow, before her armies are disbanded. Things have 
often looked dark for England before, and it is not the first 
time she has plucked the flower safely from the nettle 
danger. 



FOR A HIGHER STANDARD. 

A bill has been presented to and is now pending before 
the present Legislature the purpose of which is to amend 
and improve the law regulating admission to the bar of this 
State. The purpose of the proposed legislation is a most 
important one and is but natural, therefore, that the measure' 
is attracting a great deal of attention even from persons who 
do not seem to understand the subject matter. In the past 
there has been a great deal of looseness in this State in 
regard to admission to the bar. This was a condition of 
things that constituted an unavoidable incident to the pio- 
neer and frontier days. Where human energy is principally 
engaged in carving an empire out of the wilderness it is 
natural that there shall be a rough organization of society, 
and in that rough organization the learned professions must 
share. But the pioneer days have passed and the frontier 
conditions are no more. There is, therefore, neither reason 
nor necessity for tolerating a continuance of the free and 
easy system which throws open any of the learned pro- 
fessions to persons who have not received a proper training 
therefor. The facilities for obtaining thorough professional 
education in this State are now complete enough to justify 
organized society in surrounding these vocations with the 
barriers which civilization has always found it necessary 
to set up against the quack, the imposter and the shyster. 
It is from this standpoint that the salient features of Mr. 
James' measure should be regarded if they are to be 
viewed intelligently. 

In a general way the James' bill provides that hereafter, 
in order to obtain a certificate to practice law, the applicant 
must, as a condition precedent, make a satisfactory showing 



to the court of the fact that he has studied the science of 
which he asks permission to pose as a professor for at least 
three years (of which years nine months each must be spent 
in actual study) either in a lawyer's office or in a law school. 
The bill further provides for the regulation of the Supreme 
Court examination. The published synopsis of its provisions 
iu. this respect are so obviously imperfect that it is almost 
impossible to discuss them. This much, however, can be 
leadily affirmed: The present system of oral Supreme 
Court examinations must be abolished if those examinations 
are intended to be anything more than they have been for 
years past, and that is a farce. The Supreme Court Com- 
missioners who now conduct these examinations devote one 
day to each class that comes before them. Their day con- 
sists of four hours, two hours in the forenoon session and 
two hours in the afternoon. As there is an average of about 
thirty students in each class that presents itself for admis- 
sion, it is evident that each student has only eight minutes 
in which to unfold his knowledge of science, the literature 
of which consists of somewhere in the neighborhood of 
fifty thousand volumes. An examination of that kind is. 
of course, no test of knowledge or fitness. For that purpose 
the flip of a coin would be quite as useful. The Supreme 
Court examination of the future should be a written one and 
should extend over at least three days. Then the extent 
of the candidate's knowledge or lack of knowledge can be 
approximately ascertained. In the law schools the students 
are usually "quizzed" once a week during their first two 
years and almost every day during their last year. In addi- 
tion they have to pass a three day written examination at 
the end of each year. But all systems of examination are 
imperfect which do not provide that the student must devote 
a certain number of years to the work of training himself 
for the performance of the duties he is anxious to undertake. 
The James bill is a measure that should pass. So far the 
only opposition it appears to have encountered has come 
rrom ignorant persons, in tne press and out of it, who do 
not understand the measure and who entertain an inherent 
objection to any assertion of the standards of culture. 



THE PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION AND OUR NEW 



POSSESSIONS. 

The United States Government is making every effort 
to represent Cuba, Porto Rico, Hawaii, Tutuila, the Philip- 
pines and Guam at the Pan-American Exposition which is to 
open at Buffalo on the first of May next. The products of 
these countries are new and strange to most of us, and 
whether they have little or much to display, it will be well 
to familiarize our people with what they have to expect 
from their new tropical possessions. The Philippines, we 
know, will send hemp in all stages of manufacture, Cuba 
will make a good display of sugar and tobacco, Porto Rico 
will be represented by coffee, Hawaii by sugar and rice, and 
Tutuila and Guam by cocoanuts and bananas. What else 
they will send, it would be hard to say. Perhaps the most 
attractive display they could make would be exhibits of 
their various peoples. Let the Kanaka come along in all 
his pomp and glory, and give him an opportunity to teach 
our people how to make leis out of their beautiful wild flow- 
ers; give the brave Samoans an opportunity to see and be 
seen, especially their women, who can give our most athletic 
society belles a lesson in the art of walking. And above all 
bring across the Pacific a fair sample of our Filipino wards, 
and let us have a good look at them, and a square talk 
with them in either English or Spanish, and let us judge 
for ourselves whether they are just the kind of savages they 
have been made out to be, or not. It would be an immense 
drawing card to bring Aguinaldo over. Let him come as 
a peace commissioner, and if as a guest of the Nation, so 
much the better. Why not? He was our ally, we Invited 
and took him to Manila, where he acted in concert with Ad- 
miral Dewey. He is a brave man, an ardent student ot 
American liberty, and a lover of the common American peo- 
ple. Let him and them be brought face to face and it would 
go hard if either side permitted hostilities to be renewed. 
There never was any reason; there is no reason now, and 
there probably never will be any reason for the Filipino 
war. The American people would undoubtedly be pleased 
to go some distance out of their way to bring it to an end. 



January 19, 1MI. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW* LETTEA 



When Csvrs Are Stopped 

And the Night is Gay. 

BY REGINALD SCMUTLER. 
Of late I have fancied II rather a good thin* to si, 

■ 
-:ht. That is to say. I have quit n I 

baa n bail ■ 
and taken to sleeping late and rising at well, an) hour I 
chance to wake, perhaps far into the after i, 

- an odd life, this nighthte. that commence* After the 
stopped and ends after U 
ran across alHint everything, from painted, drunken 
ami morphine fiends to millionaires out on a lark, and 
papermen taking their little bite ami recreation against the 

afternoon's breakfast. As the Clubs are 
rather empty after twelve, it i s to the restaurant 
saloons that one wanders. All is fierce and jolly on the up- 
per floors of the French restaurants at this hour. Walters 
are rushing up and down the halls with the Inevitable cham- 
pagne, doors are softly opening and closing. The shrill 
laughter of women mingled wild hoarser vo:ee of men comes 
muffled to the ear. Two pianos in rooms on opposite sides 
of the halls are being banged. On one she :s playing a bit of 
Chopin, on the other she is playing "Mr. Johnson Sends Re- 
gards." 

A man of many clubs lounges down the hall. He says. 
Anybody for me yet." and calls the waiter by his first 
name. "No, not yet, sir." Ana he is shown to room seven- 
teen. Outside in the street there is a cab standing, the 
driver walking impatiently up and down; in it is a woman 
whose courage has failed at the last minute. Finally she 
gives the driver a dollar— for himself— ana hastens through 
the small door, where the stairs are, but no elevators. 

She soars two flights and is met by the waiter. "Mr. ," 

she drops her voice and you do not catch the name. 

"Yes. madam, right this way," and the faithful waiter 
opens the door of IT. 

Well, I have come up for a bite and a private talk with a 
fellow from the club. Somehow we have drifted upstairs. 
We are just settled over a cold fowl and a colder bottle, 
when in plump a brace of gaudy fairies of the night, the 
ubiquitous Tottie and Lottie of the French restaurant. 
1 am annoyed at first that the management permits this 
violation of privacy; but my companion takes it as a matter 
of course. We give them a glass of wine and then send them 
out to pester somebody else. 

It is a cold sharp night good for walking. All French res- 
taurants are alike at this hour, the clubs are dead except 
for the card players, and the hold-over dinner parties. There 
is nothing left but the night-hawk cabmen and the saloons. 
We walk and "do" the various gin palaces o fthe cocktail 
route. In one a lawyer and a judge, belated and a bit the 
better for the grape, are trying the case over again. 

"Anybody but you, and I'd uv fined him for contempt," 
warbles the judge. 

"Anybody but you, and I'd uv made it twice as hot," 
says the attorney. 

A jockey slips behind a curtain of a sudden and does not 
come out until long after the horse owner has left the 
place. He is to ride a big race the next day (or rather 
this). A husky beggar with a useless pencil safe from sale 
whines the usual whine. A couple of newspapermen, as 
fresh and hearty as the average businessman is at 6 o'clock 
p. m., come in and shake razzle-dazzle for a drink. 

We go outside and note the many cabs-at nearly every cor- 
ner; cabs that are never seen by day, that are idle while 
the rest of the world works, that work while the cars are 
stopped and the town is late and wicked. What tales the 
cabby could tell! As Addison Mizner used to say, "San Fran- 
cisco at night is hell in a hack." I think of "the Dance of 
Death" as I read it here years ago, when the newspapers 
used to give the book-publishers some chance to be yellow. 

Across the street is a sandwich wagon, selling ham and 
eggs, and onioned Hamburger steak — all cooked in the same 
pan, I fear, from the smell. A man in a nickel-plated hand 
tricycle. His legs are useless. But his arm is strong and 
he takes the curb stone as a steeple chaser takes four bars 
of fence. He adroitly pilots himself into the saloon. 



treet In front of a bowline 

up, but takes no , well 

o much harm. In a minute II 
and going ba, k fur i n 

\ Kirl In a green waist and n last summer's hat accosts 
us. M> mnipanion asks her. why us" Sh. ih pala from 

and perhaps Involuntarily fasting, n. 

■ nts and tells her !■■ s.i help ne Ood, I 

will as soon as I get a i up ol coffee," she 
There Is a stir along the Street It is 8:20 and the I 

Doming with the lirst editions of the morning pa- 
Tiny sell many at this hour. We look ours over in 
the light that , omea from the lamppost and the corner 
saloon. Another little drink and we are in a cab and hi 
There is little excitement for a man of the world In the 
watches of the night, but there are atmosphere, picture, and 
i something In the »ery (aces and voices of people that you 
will never And under the eandld sun of the other i 



A little spot is a little thing but it is enough to spoil 

the looks of a delicate fabric. If your suits, gloves, tapest 
rles, laees. ties or curtains are looking shabby send them 
aulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Establishment, 127 
Stockton street, and have them returned to you as good as 
new. As far as machinery and expert labor Is concerned 
there is nothing in the West to beat Spaulding. who knows 
his business and gives universal satisfaction. 



There is no substitute for G. H. Mumm & Co.'s brand of 

< hampagne which is a universal favorite in swagger circles 
the world over. There is no flavor like that of Mumm's 
and bon I hatitx universally endorse it. 



California Limited 



75 hours 

to No change of Cats and 

the most perfect seivice. 

Chicago o L 'do v ck S every raorningat9 



on 



Cnfifn Cp Ticket office at 641 Market 
J<Xll\.<X rc and at Ferry Depot. 



St 



Bethesda 



to swim in." 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 

— Db. Shbady, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 

L. CAM EN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquer Dealers, 

Hend for Pampble 418 Saoramenlo Street, 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 



Scotch Whisky 

Importers - MACONDRAY A CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 




Wand 



CtJeoiy 



ejr no wand 6ufP/eature 's^ 

Tom Jfoori. 




Pardon me if I start in with Sam Lockhart's baby ele- 
phants, but really they are the best actors in town this 
week and deserve the same first place in this column as 
they have taken it in the attention of the public. I was 
surprised to be pleased by this act, for as a general thing 
the animal act of vaudeville is a pathetic thing in which the 
only real unaffected brute is the trainer. But these baby 
elephants seem to enjoy their fun as much as the audience 
does, and as it was my unexpected fortune to be crowded 
out of my regular seat and to take refuge on the stage, I 
can assure you that they love their master and their mis- 
tress. Heavy, lumbering and awkward as the elephant is, 
he is yet, next to the dog, the most sensitive of animals. 
Snub him, and he feels it; make a sudden noise that a lion 
would ignore, and his nerves are sticking out from his 
ironclad hide; he appreciates affection and he resents 
insult. But for his size and appetite I wouldn't mind having 
one around the house. But an elephant is a heavy bird. The 
entire stage of the Orpheum has been covered with boards 
two inches in thickness and braced underneath with massive 
beams. And these elephants are only babies. If it cost 
a cent it cost some hundred dollars alone to prepare the 
stage for these diverting pachyderms. Well, they do every- 
thing that elephants can do and many things that are simply 
incredible. Along a line of bottles the breadth of the stage 
one fellow walks forward and backward; another does a 
cakewalk in perfect time; another with a knob attached to 
his tail heats a bass drum in the best of martial tempo 
while accompanied by the orchestra. Then there is a trio 
on one elongated harmonica, straight from the trunk. Never 
has the Orpheum housed an animal turn so sensational and 
so kind. 

* • * 

A farce-comedy with plenty of good situations and a de- 
lightful scarcity of songs and dances is "A Stranger in a 
Strange Land," which is enjoying considerable applause at 
the Alhambra. It is the old scheme of confused identity, 
worked up with many new complications. The tenderfoot 
Englishman who has been sent to the wilds of America 
(New York City is where he lands) comes home without the 
real live Indian that is to make his fictions good. A kind 
uncle supplies one through a patent medicine faker, a 
friend disguised contributes another, and an enterprising 
detective also turns up with blanket and war paint. The 
company is good enough for the road and the piece. 

* * * 

The worst farce-comedy of this season, or perhaps any 
other, is "A Breezy Time," which, by some unfortunate 
misrepresentation or accident, blew into the California last 
Sunday. The company is unspeakable, and a frank opinion of 
the piece unfit for publication. There was a rumor around 
town on Monday night that the local management had rung 
down the curtain on the production, but, sad to chronicle, 
there was no truth in it. 

* * * 

A snug little song recital was that given in the Columbia 
Theater on Tuesday afternoon by Antonia Dolores, whom we 
used to know as Antoinette Trebelli. Without affectation, 
without attempting any of the fiercer dramaisms of modern 
music — with, indeed, only a clean, taking personality, a 
sure, fleet voice and good sound art — Mile. Dolores sings to 
reach the heart and appreciation of the very last of us. She 
has improved in tone as well as in style, and her repertory 
is one of greater variety than that of the yesteryear; but it 
is the same olveet charm, the same soft, sure voice without 
edge to it and the same attractive and modest personality, 
ifle last of her three concerts will be given in the Sherman 
& Clay Hall this afternoon. 

* * * 

An engagement of the greatest theatrical importance to 
San Francisco is that of Mrs. Fiske, who begins a limited 
season with her New York company in "Becky Sharp" at 



the California Theater next Monday night. This will be the 
first appearance of Mrs. Fiske in this city since she became 
a star of the first magnitude, and it is safe to say that she 
will be greeted by one of the largest, most cultured and 
fashionable audiences gathered together here in many a 
night. Mrs. Fiske's fitness for Thackeray's most fascinating 
character has been accepted generally, and it is said that 
there is no actress on the stage whose personality and 
artistic method so definitely suggest this unique figure in 
fiction. 

Mrs. Fiske will give no performances on Sunday, and the 
matinee will be restricted to Saturdays. There are over 
thirty speaking parts in "Becky Sharp," and Mrs. Fiske 
requires over fifty people for the ensemble. 
* • * 

After the third and final week of "Way Down East" at the 
Columbia, Louis James and Kathryn Kidder will begin an 
engagement on Monday evening, January 28th, playing in 
Wagenhal & Kemper's revival of "Midsummer Night's 
Dream." Miss Kidder will appear as "Helena," and Mr. 
James as "Bottom." The company will include Jane Oaker, 
Norman Hackett, Robert Ryan, Ethel Browning, Ashley 
Miller, and Thomas Coffin Cooke. A ballet and chorus are 
features. 



Tivoli on Sunday night, the comic opera season proper 
opens with DeKoven & Smith's opera, "The Fencing Mas- 
ter," which Dorothy Morton played here at the Baldwin 
some half dozen years ago, and which will be put on for 
the first time at popular prices. Special attention to scenic 
faithfulness is promised, and it will be in the hands of an 
immense cast. Ferris Hartman, as "Pasqui.no," court astrol- 
oger, Maud Williams as "Francesca," and Thomas Guise 
as "Torquato," will be features. 

* * • 

Pinero's English comedy, "Sweet Lavender," will follow 
"Nell Gwynne" at the Alcazar Monday night. Florence 
Roberts closes her successful engagement here with "Nell 
Gwynne" on Sunday night, and on Monday she will leave for 
New York to secure a number of plays for her summer 
season at the Alcazar. Beginning with "Sweet Lavender" 
the Sunday matinees will commence. 

* • • 

Sam Lockhart's baby elephants will continue to be a fea- 
ture of the Orpheum bill. The Montmartrois Trio of French 
operatic vocalists will present selections from grand and 
comic opera. The trio is made up of Marius Delaur and the 
sisters Debrimont. Hacker & Lester are comedy acrobatic 
cyclists, from the Apollo Theatre, Berlin. Warren & Blan- 
chard will present a musical comedy, and Swigette & Clark 
have an original sketch in which they will introduce some 
Sis Hopkins imitations. Eugene O'Rourke will present a 
new sketch. Billy Link will tell some new stories, and the 
views on the biograph will be changed for pictures never 
before seen here. 

• • * 

Gottlob, Marx & Co. have arranged with the management 
of the Alhambra Theatre to present John Philip Sousa and 
his band at that theatre a few weeks hence. 

* * * 

At Sherman, Clay & Co.'s Hall this afternoon, Mile. Dolores 
will give a farewell concert beginning at 2:30. The pro- 
gramme will include some of the singer's best numbers, 
Robert Clarence Newell accompanying at the piano. 

* * * 

Leopold Godowsky, the Belgian pianist, will be heard in 
three afternoon recitals, under the direction of S. H. Fried- 
lander & Co. at the Sherman & Clay Hall February 12th, 
13th and 15th. This will be the first appearance of this dis- 
tingunshed artist on the Coast. 

* * * 

Teresa Carreno's recitals will take place at the Sherman 
& Clay Hall during the week of March 11th. Mme. Carreno 
created a furor when she played here last, two years ago, 
and she returns with new triumphs to her credit. 



Ask the smart set where is the logical place to go after 

theatre and they will say to a unit the CafS Zinkand, where 
Stark's orchestra discourses the best music while you enjoy 
a glass of beer and a sandwich — or a bottle of wine and a 
full dinner for that matter. 



January 19. 1901. 



•AN FRANCISCO NEWS LBTTER. 



WHEN RACING IS TRADF. 
AND SPORT IS DEAD. 



When Robbie Burn* wrote thn' lino of hi 

'ainly ,h.| not moan 
some editions of U 
- works take the trouble to specifically Infn; 

that th-- occasion of the poem was when Burns saw 

ily named In polite society, crawling 

over the bonnet of n lady engaged In her del airch. 

Still, there's never any knowing how these things may be 

taken. 

Just at present it looks to me as if the good people of San 
Krancisco — on second thoughts I do not know that I should 
have said the "good" people, for they might not cure to bo 
mixed up with racing— should pat themselves on the back 
ise people In the East take our winter racing season so 
seriously. Of course you all know the old proverb, "Omnr 

m pro magnifico," and. truth to tell, what even thi 
experienced of Eastern turfmen do not know about racing 
In California would fill volumes. I grant you that one party 
of persons Interested In the turf Is at least doing all It can to 
"elevate the sport" — Lord, aon't I hate that phrase! — but it 
is cribbed, cabined and confined by injurious precedent. 

When it comes to a straight showdown, why and where Is 
Oakland so much better than tne Gutenbergs and Gloucesters 
of the East? Of course our weather is better than that 
during the winter months in New Jersey, but every precau- 
tion was taken to mitigate the hardships of racing for the 
horses that were campaigned at those "sinkholes of 
iniquity," as some flowery critic called the Eastern winter 
tracks. And really, when one comes to think of it, has all 
the rain we have had been much less detrimental to the truly 
sporting spirit of racing than the snow and slush that Guten- 
berg and Gloucester used to have? I mean, would you, per- 
sonally, see much sport in racing horses around a saturated, 
plowed field, in order to give a pack of shivering spectators 
a chance to bet on something? 

You may have noticed that in the foregoing paragraph 
Oakland is specifically mentioned and Tanforan omitted. 
This is intentional, for, as things seem to me after having 
watched the game for several years, Oakland is the modern 
epitomization of the system that the Tanforan people are 
trying manfully though rather ineffectually to combat. 

To race for revenue and for revenue only is scarcely sports- 
manship, and yet this is what we have seen in this city for 
many years. It is useless to rake the muck heap over and 
retell how the coming of Corrigan, the bold, bad man from 
Chicago, set the seal on the commercialism of our race- 
tracks. You know it if you care, and if you don't care, what's 
the good, anyway? The stories of the days when great four- 
mile-heat races were run here seem just as legendary to us 
of the present generation as the importation of Diomed, who 
won the first English Derby, seems to the latter-day Vir- 
ginian. Yet, even in the old days, those grand heat races 
were debased, and the last of them, the veterans say, was 
so rank an exhibition that to it succeeded the long hiatus 
before racing, even at its reinception in a more or less 
commercial form, was renewed in this State. 

To-day we see the first definite and determined reaction 
from commercialism in turf affairs. I do not for a minute 
allege that the stockholders in the San Francisco Jockey 
Club are so high-minded that they do not prefer a dividend 
to a deficit, but they are wise enough to see that there is 
such a thing as killing the goose that lays the golden eggs. 
The copy-hooks have told us long ago that 1£ you do not 
progress you are bound to retrogress, and these, people are 
wise enough to have realized this. 

It is all very well for the daily newspapers to laugh at 
Prince Poniatowski's quaint little "teahouse" and the various 
bids that are being made to enlist the support of the social 
element. It's all a move in the right direction, and it cannot 
be said that the Oakland clubhouse has ever been suspected 
of having enticements for the most refined of our matrons 
and maids. And it is not only in these little homages to Mrs. 
Grundy that the San Francisco Jockey Club shows its desire 
for better things. 

Everything is being done that seems possible to improve 



">• '• .turall) in nil — 

it lli" 
the habit ■ ■' 

that have any re*! pretant - way 

'rom the Raat. and of tin**-- that do a Inrge proportion 
Hi'' i h.inc. of climate and 
in* and an when th- net results I 

. of mnteri.il to draw from. 
In aplte of this the San Prai in has shown In 

•leal way n desire to rater to the best horses by 
offering good stakes and purses of a sort to bring I 
animals to the post. 

And in saying this I do not want to ho unduly unkind to 
the mainspring nnd president of the California Jockey 01n>, 
Tom Williams. He is doing well, according to the lights of 
the turf sc hool In which he studied, but there are some things 
that such a pampered pet of an entire community can never 
be experted to absorb. The principal of these is that It Is a 
gross error to attempt to run a racetrack on a one-man sys- 
tem. But this, I fear, Mr. Williams will never learn the 
longest day he lives. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 

GI'JT ' fl I the popular hoisi:. 

allTOmiB I neatre- Reservations by 'Phone. Main 1713 

Beginning Moixlny. Jnnunry 2lst. speolat engagement MRS' 
FIsKE picsonttng (or the first lime in this city, the play In 
four act* 

BEGKY SHARP, 

(Founded on Thackery's "Vanity Fair t 

Scats now on Bale- Only Matinee Saturday- No Performance 

Sunday. 

Prices— $2.00, $1.50, $1 00, 75 cents and 50 cents. 

Gl L ' T L J. Oottlob, Marx & Co.. 

OlUmDia I neatre. Lessees and Managers. 

To-night, Sunday night and for a third and last week beginning 
next Monday, the enormous success 

'"WAY DOWN EAST" 

The most oharming pastoral drama ever slated here. 
January 38 — Louis James and Kathryn Kidder. 

A I ______ r rU^-»4- t -^ Belasco &THALL. Managers. 

Mlcazar I neatre. phone Main2M 

Week of January 2lst the pretty comedy 

SWEET LAVENDER 

Reappearance of Li la Convere. 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Seats reserved six days In advance. 
Reserved prices: 15c., 25c, 35c. . &0c. 
Next — "All the Comforts of Home- " 

OL Son Francisco's Greatest Music Hall, 

r pneUm. O'FarrellSt,. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Sam Lockhart's 

BABY ELEPHANTS, 

Montmartrois Trio, Hacker and Lester. Warren and Blanohard 
Swigette and Clark, Billy Link, The Great American Biograph, 

EUGENE O'ROURKE AND CO. 
Reserved Seats 25c. ; balcony lOo. ; opera chairs and box seats, 50c 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

T' | ■ r\ l_j Mrs. Ernestine Kreling, 

I V O I I U Dera II O USe . Proprietor and Manager. 

To-night and to-morrow, last nights of 

CINDERELLA 

Monday evening, January 21st, elaborate production of 

THE FENCING MASTER 
By the authors of Robin Hood. 

Every Evenings at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp. 
Popular prices— 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand is society's gathering place after the theater 

over. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 





L ibmryGabk 

Napoleon. The mania for Napoleonic literature which 
has prevailed for some years past, has had 
for result the producing of a great supply of more or less 
reliable data gathered here and there, to meet an ever grow- 
ing demand for fresh light upon a subject which is as full of 
interest to-day as it was eighty-four years ago, when a greedy 
public absorbed five editions of Warden*s "Letters" in five 
months. Lord Roseberry the brilliant statesman, speaker 
and writer, has rendered a notable service to history in his 
scholarly and sympathetic study of the last years of Napol- 
eon's life at St. Helena. O'Meara, Las Casas, Montholon, 
Gourgaud, Barnes, Masselin, Antommarchi, and many others 
have written more or less voluminously of the life at Long- 
wood, up to the early part of 1818, but strangely enough 
little is known of the last few years of the Emperor's life 
there. It is the period that Lord Roseberry in "Napoleon: 
The Last Phase," attempts to rescue from oblivion. For 
this last study the most fruitful material is furnished in 
the six years that Napoleon spent at St. Helena, when he 
not merely recorded and annotated his career, but afforded 
a definitive and consecutive view of himself. "Now," as 
he said there himself, "thanks to my misfortune, one can see 
me nakedly as I am." 

Lord Roseberry speaks with commendable frankness of 
the offensive treatment of Napoleon by Sir Hudson Lowe and 
Admiral Cockburn. He says: "It was a misfortune for Eng- 
land to be represented by men who forget the dignity of 
their own nation and ignored the quality of their prisoner. 
A great people must not descend to pettiness. In the treat- 
ment of Napoleon there was a pettiness all through." 

The question of title was one of the grievances of which 
Napoleon complained bitterly. To be styled "General Bona- 
parte" he regarded as an affront, and yet Lowe never ad- 
dressed his illustrious prisoner as Emperor. Many instances 
are cited of Lowe's childishness in this respect, and one 
which it must be very humiliating for an Englishman to be 
obliged to record. 

"On the Emperor's coffin-plate his followers desired to 
place the simple inscription 'Napoleon,' with the date and 
place of his birth and death. Sir Hudson refused to sanction 
this, unless 'Bonaparte' were added. But the Emperor's 
suite felt themselves unable to agree to the style which 
their master had declined to accept. So there was no name 
on the coffin. It seems incredible, but it is true." 

Lord Roseberry nowhere blinds himself to the brutal and 
sordid policy of his countrymen in dealing with Napoleon, 
but says that it is impossible in these days to be fair judges 
of the situation as it presented itself to the British Govern- 
ment. 

The book shows a great deal of careful research. If it be 
possibly somewhat lacking in finish and polish, it is so 
simply and still so forcibly written that the reader is Iett 
with the mind a prey to a haunting picture of the great Em- 
peror and his few faithful followers "perched like crippled 
sea-birds on a tropical rock." 

Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New York. Price $3.00. 

The Moon Metal. — Mr. Garrett P. Serviss has written in 
"The Moon Metal," a story much on the Jules Verne order. 
A chemist discovers the secret of drawing from the moon 
a metal unknown to the inhabitants of the earth. This metal 
becomes the coinage of the world. It is called artemisium, 
and is marketed from a mill in the Sierras of California. 
How the looting of the moon went on until our unfortunate 
satellite's metal ribs were stripped by atomic force, how the 
secret becoming public property, the price of artemisium 
fell one-half within six months, threatening to overwhelm 
the financial world, and how, at last, the various Govern- 
ments were obliged to take eftective methods to protect 
themselves and their poeple. make not only good reading, 
but a forceful argument in favor of sound money as well. 
Financiers should not miss Mr. Serviss' book. Harper & 
Brothers, Publishers, New York, Price, $1.00. 



The Roggie and Very happily conceived and very highly 

Reggie Stories. colored are the many illustrations 
by E. Mars and H. M. Squire which sup- 
plement Miss Gertrude Smith's latest book for very youth- 
ful readers or more youthful listeners. "The Roggie and 
Reggie Stories" deal with the antics of two small boys, 
brothers of Arabella and Araminta, the twin sisters intro- 
duced by Miss Smith to her juvenile readers in a previous 
volume. Wee tots will enjoy both the story and the pic- 
tures. Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New York. Price, 
$1,500. 

The Princess Ahmedie. Roland Champion tells in "The 
Princess Ahmedfie," a romance of 
Heidelberg, the story of the wooing and winning in that 
quaint old town of a princess oi one of the royal houses of 
India by a young American whose father, a lover of learning, 
had sent him thither to study philosophy. It has all the 
elements of a fairy tale and is about as realistic. 

Godfrey A. S. Wieners, Publisher, New York. Price, $1.25. 

The Hosts of the Lord. — It is again of India and matters 
Indian that Mrs. Flora Annie Steele's new novel treats. 
In "The Hosts of the Lord," the scene of the story is laid in 
Eshwara, a pilgrim's station in the hill country, where 
great numbers of people come each year to bathe in the 
"Pool of Immortality," a gypsum detritus from the "Cradle 
of the Gods," a cave where the rivers rise. It is a story out 
of the common, somewhat melodramatic occasionally, but 
full of interest to the end. It supplements admirably Mrs. 
Steele's other stories dealing with thai, lire in India which 
she portrays so well. The Macmillan Company, Publishers, 
New Y'ork, Price, $1.50. 

"The Man With the Hoe and Other Poems." — A hand- 
somely bound and illustrated edition of "The Man With the 
Hoe and Other Poems," by Mr. Edwin Markham, has recently 
been brought out. The numerous suggestive decorative pic- 
tures are by Howard Pyle; there is a reproduction of Jean 
Francois Millet's world-famous picture, and a dedication to 
"Edmund Clarence Stedman, first to hail and caution me," 
the inscription reads. The present edition is altogether a 
pleasing one, and will no doubt be in demand through the 
continued interest in and discussion of Mr. Markham's lit- 
erary work. Doubleday & McClure Company, Publishers, 
New Y'ork. Price, $2.00. 

Le Due de Reichstadt. — Especially timely is a little French 
book, recently issued, which contains a short sketch of the 
life of Francis-Charles, Duke of Reichstadt, ex-king of Rome, 
the son of Napoleon the Great and Marie-Louise. Madame 
H. Castegnier and Professor G. Castegnier are the authors 
of "Le Due de Reichstadt," and to the text they have added 
copious foot-notes in English. A portrait or Madame Sarah 
Bernhardt as L'Aiglon, and a copy of Sir Thomas Lau- 
rence's portrait of the young Duke, preface this simple 
tale of the brief existence of the ill-starred "Eaglet." Wil- 
liam R. Jenkins, Publisher, New York. Price, 50 cents. 

The Black Gown. — Ruth Hall has written in "The Black 
Gown" a tale of old Albany, in the days when Dutch in- 
fluences, customs, costumes, and even the Dutch language 
prevailed. Long and dangerous were the journeys then made 
to the Western Lakes, where most of the trading for pel- 
tries was carried on with the Indians. The soutane of a 
Jesuit priest is the gown which gives its title to the story. 
With plenty of adventure there is also plenty of love-making, 
for no less than three pretty girls lose their hearts to the 
hero. Houghton, Mifllin & Co., Publishers, Boston and New 
York, Price, $1.50. 

"Egypt and Scythia," by Heordotus; "The Advancement of 
Learning," by Bacon, and Shakespeare's "Measure for Meas- 
ure," have recently been added to Cassell's National Library, 
New Series. Cassell & Co., Publishers, New York. Issued 
weekly. Subscription price per year, $5.00. 

M. E. B. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126 Post Street 



January 19. 1M1. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 





!i* 



own Crier T& 



Miv tit CritrKifat t 




There are certain ,|, ar sights that we've wtfenMMd 
W.ii- twined imr affections about them. 

And they have become sin h n part of our lives 
Wed get very lonesome without them. 

We axpecl in the morning the rise of the na, 

It's beaming ascendent at noon. 
And night wouldn't be a success in our • 

Without certain stars and a moon. 

And oh, what a void would there be in our hearts 

If birds didn't warble in Spring. 
If winter came not with its mist and its rain. 

L.a grippe and most any old thing! 

And oh, what a desolate pang would we feel. 

If bold Nettie Craven should fail 
To ask once a week for a hearing in court 

Because of confinement in jail! 

Millionaire Carmack, who got his title together with a 
large share of Bonanza Creek in the Klondike, has, of course, 
married an Indian woman in the North and deserted her 
upon reaching civilization. Mr. Carmack feels very much 
put out that the squaw who was good enough to share his 
bed and board in the humble shack by Bonanza's gentle 
flow should have come to oeattle and have disgraced her 
proud spouse by eating with a salad spoon and being found 
drunk and undressed in the gutters of the town. There is 
one thing for Carmack to do: let him divide his sudden 
opulence with the squaw and leave her to any kind of ruin 
that she may see fit to select; or else let him take her back 
to the Klondike and give us a rest. Marital infelicity and 
badly digested riches, seem to be the predominant affliction 
of the Northmen whose fortunes are generally their mis- 
fortunes. 

The directors of San Quentin, doubtless logical men, are 
deeply hurt because C. J. Walden, an ex-convict, has again 
pruned the wings of the jailbird and flown to parts unknown 
with a snug fortune in prison property. The directors of 
San Quentin, doubtless logical men, have been, or ought to 
have been, studying the manners and customs of the prison- 
fowl for these many years; then why did they dish up their 
responsible prison jobs to that man Walden, just free from 
serving a twenty years' sentence? Were they so childish 
as to believe that a convict emerges from his cell a reformed 
man? If not, why do they feel hurt because the jailbird has 
flown with his crop full of pickings? 

Thomas H. Emerson, a senior of Berkeley, has passed his 
West Point examinations and intends to brave the rollers of 
Uncle Sam's soldier factory in the Bast. The Crier loves 
the sons of the West and prays for their lives and future 
happiness, so it is with a loving heart that he trusts that 
the prospective "Pleb" Emerson has been gradually inocu- 
lating his system with Croton oil, benzine and tobasco sauce 
and his pride to the frequent and deadly insults which seem 
to be no small part of the making of a soldier at West Point. 

Rev. Mr. Sheldon, pastor, novellist, journalist, and sensa- 
tionalist, has caused a servant-girl strike in the stricken city 
of Topeka, by certain of his delirious utterances from the 
press and the pulpit. Poor old Kansas! She has the cy- 
clone, the grasshopper, the drouth, the earthquake, the Popu- 
list, the Prohibitionist, the W. C. T. U— and the Rev. Mr. 
Sheldon! 

Captain John F. Scheller of the transport Grant declares 
that his ship is a rattletrap, apt to fall to pieces before the 
completion of another voyage. It would be well for proper 
authorities to show that Captain Schiller is mistaken or 
else condemn the vessel before it collapses in mid-ocean, 
thus adding a final act to the blessings of expansion. 



Evtn the priie-nghUr In not nil k -.nt!e n e»,. ao J« 

■•« h«« at lui turned ajralnat bin hi 
i "it In • timid : Mia own account. Tl 

know not what tie 
when thev bat prlii-fightlng in n >r| and 

nty nothing against lb* cock pit lb« .log fight, the jrl 
and the ,-ourslng pnrk. The pad 

in tbi- pugilist s rebuttal, and the 
• battle royal of words; for when tha pulpit and 
the prize-ring meet In debate. th,. n , my brethren, what a 
master struggle of hot air will m 

Richard Golden as an actor and a playwright may not be 
BCb, but It Is unquestionably true that 
In the front ranks among press agents. That affair In the 
Mardonoiigh Theatre. Oakland, where Katherlne Klttleman 
and a lady In the right box. upper tier, disputed the , harms 
"f Mr. Golden to the extent of several handful*, was certainly 
well-arranged. The Crier trusts In Mr. Golden's ability to 
avail himself of the advantage gained while adding a Judi- 
cious spice to police-court scandal and a divorce appeal by 
any of tobasco. Thus augmented, "Old Jed ProutT" might 
be almost worth going to see. 

Robert E. Glaze, who made himself successor to the Arm of 
Glaze & Trewella by means of a well-directed pistol shot, 
s. ems to be. according to all accounts, a pretty despicable 
sort of criminal. For a man to lie In wait behind a cellar 
door for his intended victim and to shoot him in the back 
when an opportunity presents itself seems to be vile enough; 
but to precede the ceremony of murder with a nicely ar- 
ranged target practice is about the superlative of refriger- 
ated villainy. The law in its refinement allows only hanging 
for Glaze's ilk; the Crier only asks that it be enforced with 
merciful dispatch. 

Talk about the "spoils system" in city government! Can 
New York show anything to equal the cool act of Police 
Officers Young and Samuels, who quietly emptied the safe 
of Wong You at 1021 Dupont street while the yellow pro- 
prietor trembled in a corner? That was pretty good for 
California, uut if the firm of Young & Samuels had been up 
in their history of the Chinese war they would have brained 
Wong You and applied to Chinese Consul Ho Yow for in- 
demnity. 

Keep in little Willie to-day, 
For the kidnapper's coming this way, 
And he's taking large bids 
At the napping of kids, 
And he's looking for lobsters, they say. 

Don't worry him, lest he annoys 
And ruffles your parental joys; 
For he holds at his back 
The Cudahy sack, 
And it's now open season for boys. 
Oh, no; it does not follow at all that because Noyes and 
McKenzie are men of legal erudition deep and wide they did 
not together, and individually and oppositely commit every 
crime from battery to arson in the frozen Territory of 
Alaska, where law and lawlessness are often a distinction 
without a difference. Indeed, you have to be an expert 
locksmith before you can hope for success in burglary; and 
so, following, 

The laws are so fixed that 

The fellows who make 'sm 
Know best how to work it 
To dodge 'em and break 'em. 
While Engineer A. R. Pullen of Sydney is telling the 
Merchants' Association about the wonders of the city re- 
modeled — new streets, new car lines, new sewerage, new 
electric lights — wouldn't it be nice if we could have a sign 
or two at a few of our street corners, an occasional little 
tag to remind the stranger from Oklahoma that he is at 
the corner of Third and Tehama streets and not at the inter- 
section of Jones and California? 

Captain J. Elmer Bernier of Quebec intends to make 
another try at the North Pole, which still continues to take 
bids for discovery. I don't know what kind of a man Captain 
Bernier is, nor how great a loss he will be to the world; hut 
it seems a pity that polar expeditions could not be open alone 
to certain public characters (we didn't mention Hobson) 
whom we could struggle along without. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 



§ 

i 



Looker Qh 




"I've riches galore," the ragged man said,. . 
"In dollars and guineas and francs. 
And the bulk of my wealth that is stored away 
Just bulges out seventeen banks. 

"And the fame of my wealth," the ragged man said, 

"To the uttermost lands has flown, 
And the kings and the queens and the great of earth 
Keep pestering me for a loan. 

"I'm remarkably rich," the ragged man said, 

"And wealth is my steadfast curse; 
But won't you please loan me a quarter, kind sir, 

For I've really forgotten my purse." 

* * * 

Humor and spontaneity with the clergy is a rare alliance: 
Bishop Moreland is rare. It is the custom of the Episcopal 
Church to hold annually a week of midday meetings in the 
Commercial Exchange Building for the Psychic benefit of 
the men of stocks and bonds; to one of the last of these 
a young reporter of exceptional blunder-talent was hurried 
away, late. When he reached the entrance he ran for the 
elevator, and missed it. 

"Hang it all, just my luck!" he grumbled as he saw it 
shooting upward. 

"No use getting mad about it; its gone;" said, what appar- 
ently was a rushing business man, coming up breathless to 
where he stood. 

"But I've got to get there for that sermon," urged the re- 
porter. 

"So have I," said the other. 

"Who speaks to-day?" the reporter asked a moment later. 

"A man by the name of Moreland," the business man ans- 
wered quietly. 

"Any good?" asked the reporter. 

"Not much," said the business man. 

The elevator came down and the two stepped in. 

"What does he talk about?" continued the reporter. 

"I declare I don't know," was the reply; "I wish I did." 

"I don't suppose he, himself knows," rattled oft the repor- 
torial idiot. 

"I 'spose not," was the laconic answer. 

The elevator stopped; inside the crowd was waiting; the 

reporter rushed for a seat, and the business man for the — 

pulpit. Another business man stepped forward with "Bishop 

Moreland needs no introduction," and the reporter with his 

chin hanging watched his elevator friend stand up and bow. 

"He said he didn't know what he was going to talk about," 
murmured the reporter as his senses returned. Then, a 
moment later, "By Jove he doesn't, he's playing for wind." 

He was right; the Bishop was playing for wind, and con- 
tinued to play for some moments. Then the words came; 
now intermittently, now in a torrent. The reporter forgot; 
the Bishop forgot; the big hall seemed to sway silently to 
the rise and cadence of that rich bass. Old grizzle-beards 
with flve-per cent eyes and hooked-nosed distrust leaned for- 
ward in their seats and moved their heads with his gestures. 
He was speaking to rushing men of the rush of life, and the 
appeal was in sound and sense. 

When he had finished and was starting away, the reporter 
came up for his apologies, and was graciously excused. As 
they again reached the elevator, the young fellow could not 
resist blurting out: 

"You said you did not know what you were going to speak 
about, and after you had begun, for a moment, 1 — 1 trem- 
bled." 

"The same here!" said the Bishop with a smile, and they 

parted where they met. 

* • * 

One of the surprises of the recent shifting process at the 
City Hall at the beginning of the century, was the desertion 
of his old familiar court room by Judge Coffey, who for so 



long had been a tenant of the apartments on the I,arkin- 
street side of the city's venerable pile of bricks. 

So long had Judge Coffey been in that suite of apartments 
that his personality was impressed on every wall, partition 
and division. The windows had been "grained" with a 
light green paint that was supposed to protect the eyes; the 
green curtains had been planned so that they could be 
rolled up from the bottom or down from the top; the green 
carpet harmonized with the curtain; the portal bore an iron- 
ical label which said: "Please slam this door," and into the 
solid framework above the bench he had encarved his fav- 
orite Latin motto: 

Fint .liisiiiin n/ai Caelum. 

Which is sometimes interpreted to mean that if justice is 
done the heavens will fall. 

The mere fact that this legend ornamented the seal of 

The vigorous old Vigilance Committee that once ruled San 
Francisco as with a rod of iron, (with the exception that 
the last word was spelled "coeVum" instead of "curium," which 
may be right) does not distract from its strength of diction, 
nor does it diminish Judge Coffey's approbation of the senti- 
ment that it expresses. 

But the flight of Judge Coffey from surroundings so con- 
genial to a court where there is not even a suggestion of 
the emerald hue, in the curtains, the carpets or other fittings, 
and where no heaven-defying motto is cut into the frame- 
work of the over-hanging canopy, caused astonishment in the 
minds of those statesmen and jurists who inhabit the City 
Hall. 

Some fragmentary remarks dropped by the Judge have 
supplied a possible key to the enigma. 

"The doorway of my former court-room was by all the 
idlers considered a proper stopping station on the main 
thoroughfare of the City Hall," Judge Coffey said, "and 
every Celtic troubadour who happened along seemed to 
delight in whistling the 'Rusticana' intermezzo, which is my 
pet aversion, and every wandering son of Italy who chanced 
my way made a stagger at 'Wearing of the Green.' an air that 
none but an Irishman can properly phrase. An ambitious 
Teuton would tackle 'Columbia the Gem.' and a Yankee try- 
ing to catch the German vote would attempt the 'Watch on 
the Rhein.' Then the common herd would get in their work 
on the Dead March in 'Saul' and the muscle dance. So 
it would go, week in and week out, for months and months, 
and years — sad, weary years — until that interminable in- 
ternational whistling congress, with its continuous per- 
formance, drove me almost to distraction, destruction, and 
drink, and finally from the apartments. I hated to leave the 
rooms, but I could not longer hold the fort against those 
pucker-faced virtuosi." 



You would not look to the interminable water suit now on 
trial in Oakland for amusement as a rule, but A. A. Moore, 
who is trying the suit for the hated corporation is one of 
the wittiest men at the bar, and his battle with Professor 
Lawson, the geologist of the State University, furnished a 
lot of fun in the way of pricking the solemn dignity of a 
college don. 

"Does the science of zoology teach a man to see what is in 
the bowels of the earth?" asked Moore. 

"Bowels of the earth is not a scientific expression," re- 
joined the professor with a sniff. 

"It's a sort of well-digger expression," came back Moore, 
with a snigger. 

"I'm not a well-digger," snapped the professor. 

"Does zoology enable you to see into the recesses in the 
earth?" 

"In a general way, yes." 

"Does it enable you to tell where there are deposits of oil?" 

"I didn't say that." 

"Do you know of any successful oil wells bored in Cali- 
fornia on the advice of a zoologist." 

"I don't recall any." 

"Does the diagram on the blackboard represent the ar- 
tesian basin of Centerville?" 

"I can't tell without looking on the map." 

"Do you know anything of your own knowledge that is not 
on a map?" 

"I think so," roared the now thoroughly enraged professor. 
'Maybe as much as lawyers." 



January 19. 1901. 



• AN r-rUNCItCO NEW* LETTER. 



11 



hal »r 
man who think* thai I 

i a frl 
the hero In T< 
nalble paarty." About a w. . 
- office. an<1 thn' 



Bl the »nca*em« 

presented with 

Mr EM-rn'a and. Ilk 

claims to !■ 

hanr.-.l to b« In ... 
recalled the fact that ha owed hl» friend » family 
Straightway Mr. BatMTg presoota I hl» friend with 
his own cards and Joculail I him to dollTi I 

lor himself called on. 

"° r I It to sonn 

girl with a box of candy." The obliging fri. 
hastened to a confectioner's, em loaed the I ird In a Ave- 
pound box of marram float, which was seal to Hlsa i.llien 
thai and charged to Mr. Esberg. 

When the young lady thanked Mr. Btoberg for the 
he had forgotten all about the card ami disclaimed Bending: 
the candy. The card was produced, Mi 
guilty, and— here is where the Mend avers that had 
been for him Esberg might still be without a bride In 
prospect. 

* • • 

There Is a new Richmond in the field of theatrical man- 
agers. He Is Louis Schwabacher of the Concordia Club, and 
he distinguished himself In the Concordia's New 

xtravaganza. "The Other Way." The chorus in this 
production was made up for the most part of the younger 
sons and brothers of the club members, and the boys worked 
hard and faithfully and sang rather well. Now, the audi- 
ences at the Concordia leave much to be desired in the way 
of enthusiasm, and when the curtain went down on the first 
act the chorus were convinced that "The Other Way" was 
a frozen one, and refused to go on. In vain did "Milt" 
Premer, the leading juvenile, "Sam" Jacobi, Pat Seidman 
and "Made-in-Germany" Koshland expostulate. Even the 
entreaties of Jack Jacobi, the beauteous prima donna, failed 
to move the chorus. At this point Schwabacher appeared 
upon the scene, followed by an efficient corps of waiters 
armed with the most powerful persuaders in the Concordia's 
cellars. Schwabacher had one with the chorus; then the 
chorus had one with Louis, and then they had several 
together. The second act went on. The grace and agility 
of the chorus was such that even the Concordia audience 
felt bound to applaud. And now the various theatrical 
managers who belong to the Concordia tremble to think of 
Louis Schwabacher's deserting the milling business for the 
box office. 

* * * 

The San Francisco Verein, which is not to be confused 
with the Turn Verein or the Schuetzen Verein, or any other 
German organization, is minus one barkeeper and plus two 
heroes. A week ago last Wednesday the mixologist was 
troubled with a toothache, and to allay the suffering of his 
molar at once proceeded to make a collection of rare and 
curious liquors. As a result he was seized with a praise- 
worthy desire to "scragg" the steward. Taking up his little 
corkscrew, he started for Fred, the club steward, but, alas 
for his cheerful design, at this interesting moment Sam 
Heller, one of Vienna's noted swordsmen, and Charley 
Brandensteln, the club's pugilistic specialist, entered the 
bar, rushed upon the man of drinks and suppressed him. 
Presently two guardians of the law haled the "booze clerk" 
to the donjon keep of the city, and the heroes of the occasion 
were toasted in straight goods — mixed drinks strictly barred. 

* * * 

It was at the City Receiving Hospital the other day. A 
man had just been ambulanced in with a broken skull. 
His condition seemed serious, and he called for a priest. 
The priest came, and began reciting the prayers of the 
dying over the wounded man. 

"Fathherr, am Oy a goner?" 

"God rest you, my son, God rest you." 

"O fathherr, am Oy a goner?" reiterated the wounded man 
a little more impatiently. 

"God rest you, my son, God rest you," again answered the 
priest, evading the question. 

"But, fathherr, am Oy a goner?" 

"God rest you, my son, God rest you," came the monoton- 
ous refrain. 

"Oh, say, fathherr," finally whispered the dying man, 
"quit your joshing, now. Am I a goner?" 



> l ft twlna whlarMTml among the clubs In nil In. 
nablp ,|i,i|. 

my limn an.l was standing 
I holding In her hand* a 
trlbutions toward a V 
dlnnei 

' man of the I'.,. Ill, i 
' is drunk almost ns nun b . Iiatiipaxne as he has a) 
suing Into the waltlni of the 

th the vaulted hat, and stop 
I what are you doing here, my pretty > hll-l 
paternally. 
I am taking gifts for a New Year's dinner to l„- girao !■• 
■r anil homeless of tin- city." she unsw 
"Indeed; well. I'm sure I would deny nothing to so pretty 
i young miss. Here's a five-dollar piece." 
Having dropped the money into the little box. he said; 

And now. my child, where may I hope to see you again?" 
"In heaven, I hope, sir," she sweetly answered, as she 
turned to the next contributor. 

* • • 
Out on Washington street there is a good old German 
shoemaker who has not been long away from the Vaterland. 
Lately he had his shop painted, and. to warn his fellow-be- 
ings of the danger of fresh paint, he stink up the following 
luminous sign: 
"Look a little out." 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



A Perfectly Pure Olive Oil of the Finest Quality and 
Delicacy of Flavor. 

Crosse & BlackwelVs 



Purveyors to the Queen 



Pure Lucca 




oiive) oil 



Every Bottle Bears a Neck Label 
Guaranteeing Its Purity 



Sherwood & Sherwood, 

212-214 Market St., Importers. 



CALIFORNIA NURSERY CO. 
Niles, Cal. 

JOHN ROCK, Manager 
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL 

Oranges, Olives and Grapes 

Resisting Vines 

Rupestris St. George. Riparia G olre de Montpellier. Riparia a, 
grandes feuilles. Solonis Robusta. 

The largest and finest collection of Palms, Ornamental Trees, Rose 8 
Shrubs and Vines on the Pacific Coast. Send for our catalogue. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 




Rotten System 
of Business. 



A CONTEMPORARY, in commenting 
A Relic upon the reported sale of the old Mu- 

of Antiquity. latos mine, in Sonora, Mexico, says it is 
another case of "a big mine with a big 
name." We might be permitted to remark, after having seen 
it dragged across the carpet repeatedly for the past twenty 
years, that the name is the biggest part of it, only excelled 
by the long sight of some of the so-called experts who have 
reported upon it. If it is sold this time it will only go to 
prove that there is a new and choice crop of fools in the 
world ready for the reaper. In the past no one yet was able 
to swallow the gilded bait, although it is only fair to say that 
the experts who examined it on every occasion when it 
cropped up before the public were quite as proficient in 
the art of "drawing a long bow" as any of the modern lights 
of the profession. It recalls happy memories of many a 
Tom Pepper of the days gone by to read of the 800-foot 
ledge, only waiting for a 500-stamp mill to take up the work 
of reduction outlined for centuries. Not having yet got in 
touch with the latest prospectus, which is likely to prove a 
gem of the promoter's art, it is impossible to contemplate on 
this occasion the lengths some men will go to to earn a 
dollar; but an old document of the kind which was issued in 
the '80's is still in evidence of what years have failed to 
accomplish in support of a single allegation of the so-called 
"experts" employed by them. Another decade of a similar 
experience in regard to the latest outpour of "hot air" will 
make the people sick who are to step into the shoes of the 
present owners, relieving them of a white elephant while 
making the fortunes of a lot of promoters. 

A FEW lines which appeared recently 
The Golden in the News Letter furnished a text for 
Cross Mines. a local correspondent of the London 

Financial News to air himself upon the 
values of the Golden Cross mines of Southern California. 
While free to confess we are not in a posit/on to discuss the 
subject, only knowing the property by reputation, it is safe 
to say that any inflation in the price has taken place in 
London by the promoters, whoever they may be. One of the 
parties here who is interested in the matter states in reply 
to the criticism that it is not correct in placing the price 
asked at $4,000,000 to $5,000,000, claiming at the same time 
that on the 900-foot level a drift is out 1,500 feet, all in ore. 
The way things now run in London, especially since the 
Stratton, Independence and Globe Consolidated experiences, 
the promoters of any mining scheme are likely to have a 
remarkably hard time in disposing of their wares, and espe- 
cially if there is any suspicion of inflation. Besides it is 
a very easy matter now to get a safe approximate valuation 
on a property if honestly desirous of doing so. Of course 
in dealing with men who believe in getting rich in a minute 
by doubling up the pripe of a mine there is no argument, 
and the onus falls eventually upon the people who overlook 
the old legal maxim of caieat emptor. 

THE latest departure in the oil busi- 

A New ness is the organization of another 

Oil Exchange. Oil Exchange, which will likely be 

termed the San Francisco Oil Ex- 
change. The membership is to be 118, the surplus over the 
hundred to be made up of brokers in the Pacific Board, 
where the business will be carried on. The success which 
of late has attended the Producers' Oil Exchange paved the 
way for the new venture. The brokers of that institution 
have scored a signal success, and the organizers of the new 
San Francisco Exchange are determined to put it upon a 
footing at the start which will insure it a large share of the 
public patronage. The applications for membership up to 
date include some of the most substantial business men of 
tnis city, and an able and vigorous management is assured. 
There is abundant room here now for two Exchanges of the 
kind, and one should not cramp the other. 



THE stock market on Pine street 
has developed another feature which 
stamps it the freak institution of the 
universe. The collapse of values fol- 
lowing the development of ore in Consolidated California and 
Virginia could not have taken place under the auspices of 
any other lot of men posing before the public as brokers. 
It only tends to corroborate the widespread belief that there 
is more money for the guild on Pine street in breaking 
stocks than in an active and rising market. This is a rather 
cheerful state of affairs for the other fellow who has staked 
money for years past on the prospects for ore discoveries 
on the Comstock and paid assessments to help find them. It 
the precedent is going to be established that a stock goes to 
the devil the moment the mine gets into ore there won't be 
many left who will take the risk of opening the purse 
strings anywhere around the San Francisco Stock Exchange. 
A very large proportion of the money now paid in the belief 
that it is going to aid in the development of mining, when not 
paid directly at the companies' offices, goes to short sellers 
in the form of dividends, on the old-time principle that what 
is one man's meat is another's poison. Some idea can be 
gleaned from this of where the profits come in for profes- 
sional short sellers upon an apparently dead market, and of 
the utilities of stock left by outside investors in the hands 
of brokers who do not hesitate to loan tnem out to shorts 
who live by wrecking the market. If every man and woman 
who carries stock on margins went down to Pine street on 
Monday morning to take them up there would be some lively 
music in the air before the sun went down. The rotten con- 
dition of a market which fails to respond to ore development 
is due entirely to abuses which have crept into the broking 
business of late years and which are winked at or tolerated 
by the Exchange. A new Mining Board is very badly needed 
in San Francisco just now. 

Judging from the tone of the report 
Big Profits of of the Alaska Exploration Com- 

Alaskan Traders. pany just to hand by mail from 
London, business must be pretty 
lively up North, the total net profit for the year ending June 
30, 1900, amounting to $316,547.8o, compared with $191,495.96 
for the preceding year. This money, with the exception of 
$15,018.14, credited to the Sweetcake gold mine, in Golovin 
Bay district, was made in the transportation and trading 
business at the company's stations located at Dawson, Eagle 
City, Nome City, Council City and St. Michael, the largest 
profits being cleaned up at Dawson, itemized at $217,501.66. 
Out of the profits a dividend of 85 cents per share, amount- 
ing to $170,000, has been declared. The Sweetcake 
mine mentioned above seems to be the only property paying 
the company at present, and since the annual report was 
made out a further amount of $12,000 has been received from 
this claim, charged to next year's accounts. Other claims 
in Klondike are as yet undeveloped, including what is con- 
sidered a big, valuable property known as the Rock Creek 
coal mine. If all the other companies of this class are doing 
as well up North there must be considerable money in 
mining and looking after the wants of the enterprising ten- 
derfoot prospector for hidden wealth in the Arctic zone. 

THE annual meeting of the 
The Columbian stockholders of the Columbian 

Banking Company. Banking Company was held Jan- 
uary 12th. The usual semi- 
annual dividend at the rate of 6 per cent per annum was 
declared at the beginning of tne year. The following were 
elected directors: I. J. Truman, W. S. Miller, Colonel J. C. 
Currier, C. O. Perry, F. L. Turpin, John Coop and R. L. 
Lilienthal. I. J. Truman was elected president; W. S. Mil- 
ler, vice-president; Colonel J. C. Currier, secretary; F. L. 
Holland, cashier; C. A. Smith, assistant cashier. 

THURSDAY last, January 17th, was 
the anniversary of the first strike of 
oil by the Peerless Oil Company of 
this city. The company is now ready 
to furnish oil at the rate of i,250 barrels per day, and its 
stock is now quoted in the neighborhood of par. This is a 
healthy record of which the management may well be proud. 



The Peerless 
Oil Company. 



To Cure a Cold In One Day 

Take Laxative Bromo-Qulnlne Tablets. All druggists refund 
the money If It falls to cure. E. W. Grove's signature Is on each 
box. 25 cents. 



J«nu*ry It. tMt. 



SAN FRANCISCO NIWS UTTER. 



tl 



Money Coming 
to California. 



MR JOHN H \> 
In town during ' 



It la said upon Rood authority that ba »lll !•-■». afl 

nit-nta of consldorBM- money In 

lornla enterprises, and to this matter he Is now devoting his 

time. While his headquarters are In this . II itlnn- 

nlly making trips Into the Int.'rinr to 'llfferent DC 



Uoa Anj It* 

Okld u« ndi 

OltidTnuiH Oo«S.. 

OocsnlcSMfoSV 

Ombu- Ct.lc Rr '•■•. 



With 



Shares. H'»t 



.tamo i<m 



I.". 



«lnc sr« the lniii*«oli..ti* .>t. the rM«ck ■•! I 
J»n "Ihloj.n 17lh. 191 

»tI8CKlJ.\NKo(s BOFJDH 

RojrOounllr* SS . •■ Ml". -PAS.lVKi 

Hswsll. WISmIoH.! 

lx* Anils Uiv •.*.... ».•■■! | look si' Brmi i 

i 111', s r 
loooo « in ITWWMl Mia 

T.ttoajn.'. ,"ii»xs vw u 

».000»10- , j USHond. 

128 

STOCKS. 

I-'sl Share". H-l 

.a a Stocks. 

■I Hans ■ 

Hawaiian Oom'l 

: ■ llonakss lolo »1 

■ t.hlnson -> 

mi Kilauea wo II 

ll .kmveli 415 II". Il 

I"'' i onoinoa 93 

Piiaiihaii S PI Co 1? 

^>i^ MlHCBLLASEOUS. 

Alaska Packers 27" 

150 Cal. Fruil (.'aimers * 

-I C«J Wine A»9II 1" 

2 E iloeunlo S S Co 115 

Transactions for this week amount to 7,312 shares stock and 
210 000 bonds against 5747 shares stock and 201.000 bonds for Ihe 
previous week. 

Gas and Electric bas advanced from Jo 1 ,; to Is. 

Assessment of 50 cents a share bas been levied on Vlgorit Powder 



Contra Costa Water... 7.*> 
Sprlna Valley Waler. jr. 
(Ian a.nd Elbctbic, 

Equitable I' 1 

Oakland Gas.. 50 

Mutual Electric I 1 ". 

Pacific (la» Imp 155 

Oaa and Electric Mg 

Htbebt Railroads. 

California St 10 

Market Street 810 

POWDEEB. 

California ...... 13 

Olant.. 8" 

VlBorlL 25 



70S 
93 

sBS 

MM 

135 

my t 

ISO 



I:-.', is.', 

Ida i"j 

log log 

loi loOK 



The Cox Seed Company's Annual for 1901 is in every sense 
a twentieth-century publication. While filling all the com- 
mon requirements of a catalogue and complete in every 
practical detail, it is yet a handsome, interesting book for the 
casual reader. The colors are in gold and several colors, with 
a striking figure of a woman in a field of flowers, and three 
vivid reproductions of the giant yellow tulip poppy (/funno 
Hiinihia Fvmariaefolia) . Every one of the ninety-six pages 
bears from one to five illustrations, making it not only easy 
for the purchaser to select just the seed wanted, but dis- 
playing in a most complete manner the flowers, vegetables, 
trees, shrubs, climbers, melons and what not that may be 
raised in the West. As a souvenir of the vitality and pro- 
ductiveness of Pacific Coast soil, this Annual is a recoru by 
itself. It will be sent free on application to the Cox Seeu 
Company, 411 Sansome street, San Francisco. 



Last Thursday night the annual reunion and banquet of 
the California Business College was held in the assembly 
hall of the college. Dr. David Starr Jordan delivered a very 
entertaining discourse on Japan, his lecture being illustrated 
with stereopticon views. Among prominent speakers were 
Rabbi Voorsanger, Cecil W. Mark, Harr Wagner, W. C. 
Morrow and W. H. Jordan. Professor R. L. Durham, presi- 
dent of the college, acted as toastmaster. 



The Highest Standard. 
Of excellence is demanded from the beginning to the end 
of the production of the Gail Borden Eagle Brand Condensed 
Milk, — a system maintained for forty years. Never buy un- 
known brands. 



CLERKS WHO RECEIVED A FINE XMAS GIFT. 

Mr. Pattnsien gave all of his clerks a per cenlase for the entire 
month of December. Some made more than their salary which is 
much higher than clerks usually receive. The motto of the gentle- 
man is to treat his help just as good as the public. This is worthy 
to be copied by all bosses; then there would be more contentment 
among Ihe people and Markbam's great poem the "Man With the 
Hoe" would never have been written. 



Lad" Graduate Leipsio Conservatory Music. Beginners 50 ots 
Room 41, 791 Sutt er St. 

Child charaoter study. Professional adaptation; diagnosis. Mrs. Wm. 
MeManus, 731 Guerrero street. 




The cleaning 

of carpets 



iumt taking them up. 
ilty with 
Pearline. Aft< 
thorough sweeping 
simply scrub them with 
Pearline and ■ 

Then you wipe tlicp-: 
off with clean water, 

and sit down and 

v their newness and freshness. You ought 
to be able t'> do a good deal of sitting down, if 
in all your washing and cleaning you use 
Pearline. I'se it alone — no soap with it. w 



nining Hachinery s n uPP He, 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

Bartlett Concentrating Table. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

PARKE & LACY CO., 21 and 23 Fremont St 

San Francisco 

"4 Genuine Old Brandy made from Wine. 

— Medical Press [London), Avg. 1899 

MARTELLS 
THREE STAR 
RRANDY 

AT ALL RESORTS AND RESTAURANTS 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., san francisco 
Pacific Coast Acents 

Chicago in 3 Days 



From San Francisco 

Chicago, Union Pacific and 



At 10 a. m. 



North-Western Line 

Double Drawing-Rooru Sleeping Oars, Buffet, Smoking and Library 
Cars, with barber. Dining Cars — meals a la carte. Daily Tourist 
Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every week from 
San Francisco at 6 p. m. The best of everything. 

K. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617 Market St., Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 



ORDERS FOR BUYING AND SELLING STOCKS (LISTED 
OR UNLISTED) PROMPTLY ATENDED TO BY 

JOSEPH P. TOPLITZ, Stock Broker 

Telephone Bush 385 

Members Producers' Oil Exchange, Rooms 9 and 10, 330 
Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 



f,. 



nsurance. 



Governor Odell in his message says: "The surplus of sav- 
ings banks and insurance companies, which is now held as 
a reserve and which amounts to $469,707,751, should pay 
its proper proportion of the taxes, because it is, in effect, the 
capital of such banks and companies, and should be so 
treated. I do not believe in attacking the deposit of the poor 
man, whether in savings banks or in the form of life insur- 
ance. Every possible inducement should be afforded by 
the State to encourage saving by those who labor and desire 
to lay up a fund against a 'rainy day.' But this surplus 
which accumulates from time to time should bear its portion 
of the tax burden, and the enactment of a law which would 
tax it at the rate of one per cent.* * * would not be too 
great, in consideration for the protections and safeguards 
which our State throws around savings banks and insurance 
companies. These suggestions, in my judgment, if favor- 
ably acted upon, will greatly relieve the burden upon real es- 
tate. In return for this I should favor exemption from pay- 
ments by banks, other than savings banks, of all local as- 
sessments for State purposes, and in the case of savings 
banks and insurance companies, from all other taxation ex- 
cept upon their real estate." 

* * * 

The Pacific Underwriter issued an extra, giving the re- 
sults of the fire business for 1900. 

This is the way some of the companies line up on 
premiums and loss ratios: 

CALIFORNIA COMPANIES. 
San 
Prancisco Amount Losses 

Company Premiums- Written, Preruiutns. Paid. Ratio 

Firemans Fund '57.K71 818,674.798 «3tW,826 $I6",543 53.5 

Home Fire and Marine 11.498 8 338,391 131 199 76.476 50 9 

Totals S72.369 fc7,0l3.l92 J435.0J5 8237.019 54-4 

Louis Weinmann is agent of the Fireman's Fund and Stephen D. Ives is 
the aeent of the Home Fire and Marine. 

FOREIGN COMPANIES. 

Aachen & Munich Cesar Bertheau 8 93.762 

Alliance -■■ C. F- Mulllns .64.475 



Commercial Union ■ C. F. Mullins ... 109,181 

Ha uburg-Bremen RHer-ldJr 88,182 

Liverpool & London &. Globe. C D. Haven. I91.ll.i7 

London & Northern Geo F.Grant-. 12I',0"< 

London & Lancashire. Win- Macdonaid 183,678 

Netherlands Wm- Macdonaid 44.671 

NewZealand W- P. Thomas- 39.014 

North British Tom C.Grant 99,065 

Norwich Union W. H Lowden. 93.805 

Palatiue Chas. A- Lalon 89.129 

Phcenix Butler & Hewett 109.20-1 

Royal Rolla V- Watt. 115.020 

Royal Exchange Frank Dickson 109.024 

Scottish Uuion & National R- C. Medcraft 67.80 , .i 

State Wm- Macdonaid- 2 ',06l 

Sun Insurance Office J. B. F- Davis & Son .. . 90,711 

Svea Edward Brown & Sons..... 96.071 

Transatlantic V- C- Driffield 102.555 

Thuringia Voss. Conrad & Co 153,296 

COMPANTES OP OTHER STATES. 

jEtna Boardman & Spencer ..8 120.521 

American Central Clias- < hristensen- 29.955 

Fire Association T- C. Sbankland. 47.193 

German, 111 C H Ward 14 127 

Hanover Cesar Bertheau. 50.627 

Harlfort H. K- Belden 189,'SO 

Home H-L-Roff 205,810 

Ins. Co- of North America. .... Jas- D- Bailey 9,476 

Milwaukee Mechanics. L- L. Bromwell 80,146 



Manhattan . Fallon & Co 

Northwestern Fational Geo. W- Turner 

Orient AVm. Macdonaid 

Phenix of Brooklyn Geo- J. Wellington-. 

Queen RollaV.Watt 

Westchester Henry C. Keller ■ -. 



12.595 
78,351 
17,914 
35.779 
64,0b) 
47.736 



34-4 
40.7 
5I.G 
31.1 
39.9 
297 
83-1 
161 
49.5 
29.4 
35-7 
478 
56-4 
44-1 
32-9 
369 
111 
46.3 
44 M 
356 
31.9 



19-8 
45.5 
49.4 

10.2 
42 1 
55 9 
51 5 
-iiui 
20.0 
383 
23.9 
24.3 
45-4 
13-0 



The Supreme Court of the United States has decided 
the case of the Liverpool and London and Globe Insurance 
Company vs. Kearney & Wise, involving the validity of 
the clause in a fire-insurance policy requiring the assured 
to keep an inventory of his effects in a fireproof compart- 
ment, and holding the policy void if this were not done. 
Kearney & Wise were hardware dealers in Ardmore, I. T., 
and lost their policy. 

* * * 

H. M. Keller of the Westchester is back to San Francisco. 

* * * 

J. G. Conrad of Voss & Conrad is expected back in a few 
days from his New York trip. 

# * * 

How about a deposit law? 



A resident of Stockton, says an exchange, had his right 
arm broken; was badly bruised about his entire person, and 
suffered a severe contusion on the back of his head, while 
being "adopted" into a camp of the Modern Woodmen so- 
ciety. Moral: There is a sucker born every minute. The 
Modern Woodmen society having broken up the anatomy of 
tne adopted, will, it is supposed, now proceed to break his 
cash account. 

* * * 

The Tarrant case is still moving. 
» * * 

Secretary Weinmann of the Firemans Fund Insurance 
Company is smiling all over his good-looking face. His fam- 
ily, wife and children, are back from their continental tour. 
* * * 

Statements are in season. 

• * * 

There will be something doing in Los Angeles. C. H. Ward, 
Pacific Coast manager of the German of Freeport, is down 
there. 



There is mire Catarrh in this section of the country than all other dis- 
eases put together, and until the last few years was supposed to be incur- 
able. For a great many years doctors pronounced it a local disease, and 
prescribed local remedies, and by constantly failing to cure wilh local 
treatment, pronounced it incurable. Science has proven catarrh to be a 
constitutional disease, and, therefore, require* constitutional treaumnt. 
Hall's Catarrh Cure, manufactured by F. J. Cheney & Co.. Toledo, Ohio, is 
the only constitutional cure on the market. It is taken Internally in doses 
from 10 drops to a teaspoonful. It acts directly on the blood and mucous 
surfaces of the system. They offer one hundred dollars for any case it fails 
to cure. Send for circulars and testimonials. Address, 

F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O. 
K®~ Sold by Druggists, 75c. 

Hall's Family Pills are the best. 



THE NICKEL PLATE ROAD (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R.) 

offers East bound passengers three elegantly appointed ves- 
tibuled express trains daily between Cnicago and New York 
and Chicago and Boston. For sleeping car reservations and 
full information address Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast Pas- 
senger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



SOUTHFIELD WELLINGTON COAL 
order from any coal dealer. 



Fire, Lightning, and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital, $3,000,000 Gross Assets, 912.808. 395 

Surplus to Policy-holders, $7,631,926 
H, L. Roff, General Agrent; Geo. M. Mitchell &, Co., City Aeents. 

210 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal- 
Ttae Home has a well-orsranlzed, competent, and experienced force of Gen- 
eral and Special Agents resident in the Pacific Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of ltB aeents and the insur- 
ing public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pay- 
ment op Losses 

New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of New York 

405 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal, 

Edmund F. Geeen. Manager. Jesse W. Lilientiial, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability, Accident, Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Phenix Insurance Company of Brooklyn, n.y. 

415 MONTGOMERY ST.. S, F. 

Capital Sl.000.000 

Surplus 2.520.708 

Assets 6.816,560 

GEO. T. WELLINGTON. State Agent for California. Oregon, and 
Washington. 

Pacific Coast Underwriting Co. 

Main Office— 507-508-509 Parrott Building, San Francisco. 
Companies Incorporated Bond furnished to guarantee stocks. Oil lands 
and mining properties for sale or lease. 

E. D. COKING, President. 
W. B. BURKOWS. Secretary. 
J. E. FIRMSTONE, Auditor. 



Pacific COAST DEPARTMENT 




G. M, WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET. 
Sai Francisco, Cal 



INSURANCE COMPANY 

OB" -FR.HTH1PORT Phone. Main 55'*). 



January 19, 190'. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW* LETTIR. 



16 



SENOINO THE VOTE TO WASHINGTON 

Samuel M. Shortndge la oa his way to WTaahlDjrl 
California ' 
Snrramonto Um TinillJ ■ 
- In th-- history nf tl 

■ 
'• ith tlng>, i 
in •rtdence ami n crowd ih r i, . - last lc 

It was Indeed an im; When tl 

bad conferred the honor i>f messenger on Mr a 
granting to him the privilege o( conrerlng I 

nir ballot-hot. he replied In an address that, while 
brief, was one of the most forceful and eloquent In n 
oratory. After advising us as I people not 
drunken on power, he bade us remember that • ha 
intelligence. Justice to all before the law. equality of public 
burdens and respect for human rights were essential to the 
republic's perpetuity. In conclusion Mr. Shortridge said: 
"California, crowned with her fifty years and garlanded 
with her flowers, looks into and salutes the twentieth can- 
tury with pride and hope. Her devotion and loyalty to the 
Union have been tested and proved on land and sea. and as 
ardent a patriotism swells In the hearts of her children as 
that which inspires those who tread upon Bunker Hill or 
walk within the shadow of the Washington monument our 
liag, which is the symbol of our power and justice, is the 
emblem of a righteous and Christian civilization. Whatever 
storms may gather, whatever dangers internal or external 
may menace, whatever problems charged with restles! 
and discontent may arise, be assured that with the love or 
the people and the approval of God the flag will continue to 
represent constitutional government, liberty under law, free- 
dom of conscience and enlightened and progressive civiliza- 
tion. This is not only a patriotic and inspiring but a solemn 
occasion; and, duly mindful that God has blessed us as a 
people, let us with due reverence and veneration invoke his 
continuing smile upon our beloved State and our glorious 
nation." 



FINE FURNITURE AND CARPET SALE. 

This is a very good time for housekeepers to buy fine furniture, 
carpets, rugs, lace curtains, and draperies at low prices. The 
Pattosien Co. is ottering their entire stock at very low prices during 
the great challenge sale. This house has become in a tew years one 
of the foremost houses on the Coast. The reason for it is that fine 
stock is selling at low prices when real Wilton Velvet Carpet sells 
at $1.05, Exmister, best quality, at .$1.10; it means something. All 
other goods at same low prices. Cor. Alission and 16th streets. 

Piano lessons, 75c. Experienced teacher. Good testimonials 
419 Van Ness Avenue. 



—After twenty-four years under the Palace Hotel, Marsh's Jap- 
anese Fine Art Store has moved to 214 Post street. 



INSURANCE 



h 




H Solid 

Secure • 
Progressive J 


l jli- 




K thePacific MG%al 4fj 

■R.A.ofCaliforjma 

■KKi. ' i2u^atVj5*3M£*-'. 




EkI*^** 





The Pacific Mutual 



Life Insurance Co. 

of California 
Organized 1868.) Paid Policyholders. $11,000,000 

Kilgabif & Beavee, General Agents Life Department 
P. W. Voogt, General Agent Accident Department. 
Pacific Mutual Building, S. F. 



FI»C. MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 
PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 



OP LONDON ENGLAND 



O-F MUI.I.INs. Manager. 4lG-|l« California street. S. F. 
PIRB INSURANCE 



Pounded A. D. 1792 



Insurance Oompany of / North America 

OF PHILADELPHIA. FKKS. 

Paid-up Capital t3.000.000 

Surplus to Policy Holders $5.022 016 

JAMBS D. BAILEY. General Agent. 412 California street, S. F. 



Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up. $3,446,100 Assets. 924,034.11055 

Surplus to Policy Holders. S9.612.45S.96 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

op New Zealand 
Capital. 16,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office In company's building, 312 California street 

„ „,. . W. P. THOMAS. Manager 

Hookek ft Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER & HEWITT. General Agents 



413 California street. S. F. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 3,869,451.75 

Surplus to Polioy Holders 2,068,839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Franolsco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 
Capital $8,700,000 



BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 



316 California street, 8. F. 



The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital, $2,250,000 Assets, $10,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. SCHLESINGER, City Agent, 301 Montgomery street, San Francisco 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 




— Miss Nina Frances Layard writes in Harper's some 
verses on the Christians massacred in China. Here is a 
part of the poem: 

The Sower flings His seed afield — 
I dare not question, of its kind; 
It leaves the furrows red behind. 

No bird will rob Him of the yield. 

"Seed of the Church," I heard Him say, 
"I water it with tears and blood; 
My life is mingled with the flood, 

And not a corn of wheat shall die." 

The trouble of our times increase; 
Like fading shadows we depart. 
O Brother of the Broken Heart, 

Let sorrow blossom into peace. 

What chance is there for immortality of the soul 

from the point of view of modern science? Do the known 
facts of the universe offer man any real hope, throw any 
true light on his ultimate destiny? Professor N. S. Shaler, 
of Harvard University, (chair of geology), attempts to give 
the scientific view of this subject in a recent book entitled 
"The Individual: A Study of Life and Death." In his pre- 
face Professor Shaler says: "As will be seen, the effort is 
io show that brevity of life in the individual necessarily 
arises from the educable qualities of the individualities of 
that group; that in proportion to the advance in station of 
any group of animals and plants the i duration of its mem- 
bers has to be more and more accurately fixed, until in man 
and other of the higher forms the tetrm is as firmly estao- 
lished as are the features of the body. It is in the consider- 
ations relating to the nature and history of the individual 
that we may hope to find wnatever of moral help natural 
science can give us. The facts, when clearly seen, lead us 
to a better understanding of what death means in the great 
order." 

A singular suggestion is made in a recent British na- 
val prize essay by Major C. Field, of the Royal Marines. In 
discussing the best form of vessel for future naval use, 
Major Field proposes a type that shall be built so as to re- 
semble a large mail steamer as closely as possible; not 
only, he says, in order to give her a better chance of ap- 
proaching an enemy's cruisers without arousing suspicions, 
but also to create among them a feeling of caution when com- 
ing up to a mail-boat which may, to some extent, favor the 
latter's escape. This point should be carried out so that 
the ship will stand a minute scrutiny through the glass 
even at a moderate distance. No military tops are then pos- 
sible, and the funnels should preferably be two only in num- 
ber, though three might in some cases be permissible, as 
a few mail steamers carrj: tnat number. 

In Victoria street, Westminster, are the rather sump- 
tuous chambers of a middle-aged professional gentleman. 
From these same chambers have come the plans upon which 
the mirrors of nearly every principal jewelry establishment 
in London, Paris and elsewhere have been arranged. The 
professional gentleman is an artist in mirror arrangement. 
No matter what the shape or size of a given shop or office, 
says a writer in Pearson's Weekly, he will so arrange 
absolutely unobtrusive mirrors that the one person in the 
secret can from a given point see the minutest movement 
of every assistant, customer and even window gazer. 



PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 

A sovereign remedy. One dose will cure a cough. It never 
falls, 'try it. Price, 25 cents. George Dahlbender & Co., 
214 Kearny street. For sale by all druggists. 



Well bred people who are familiar with the city prefer 

to eat at Swain's Bakery and Restaurant in Sutter street, 
where the service is the most refined and quiet and the 
cuisine the most perfect. Swain's has enjoyed an exclusive 
patronage for many years, and is among the oldest establish- 
ments on the Coast. Orders are taken for breads, pastries, 
ices, chicken sandwiches, etc. 




TROCHES. 



Neglect of a Cough or Sore 
Throat may result in an 
Incurable Throat Trouble or 
Consumption. For relief use 
BROWN'S BRONCHIAL 
Nothing excels this simple 



remedy. Sold only in boxes. 



Special Sale 



of 




Fine French Nixed 
and Assorted Chocolates 
30 cents a pound at 

WICHMMSTS, 754 Market Street. 



FELIX'S ROTISSERIE, 

Felix Gouailnardou, proprietor, 537 California 
street, below Kearny. Private rooms for families 
and ban-juets. 

Telephone Black 2U0U 



About Travel. 



NO. 1. 

In choosing a tour it is safe to follow the majority. 
One can't afford to be careless about so important a 
matter. Your money (certainh ) and your comfort 
and health (perhaps) are involved. There is only one 
world wide tourist firm— THOS. COOK & SON." Go 
where you will you can't get away from us. "The 
best is always the cheapest." 

Tickets everywhere. Parties to the Hawaiian Is- 
lands. Feb. 2, 18 days. $150; Feb. 13, 30 days, $230 
To Japan— March 30, G5 days, $000. All expenses 
included. 

8HALL WE SEND YOU DETAILS ? 

THOS. COOK & SON, 

621 Market St., San Francisco 



STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. 
Ophir Silver Mining Company. 

Pur«uanl to the order of the Board of Di-eetors of the Ophir Silver Mining 
Company made at a meeting of said Board, held on the 19th day of 
December, 19'I0, notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Stockholders 
of said Company, will beheld at the office of said Company, at its office. 
Room No- 6 n , Nevada Block. No. 31*9 Montgomery street, in the City and 
County of Sun Francisco, State of California, on the 
28th DAY OF JANUARY, IflOl, 

at the hour of one o'clock p. m- of said day. for the purpose of ratifying or 
refusing to ratify the act of Ihe B.-ard of Directors of said Company in 
purchasing for said Company those two certain mining claims situate, lying 
and being in the Virginia Mining District, Storey County. - tate of Nevada. 
known as and called the Summit Gold and Silver < 2 uarlr Mining Claim and 
the Last Chance Qua tz Mining Claim, for the sum of three thousand 
dollars. 

Dated, San FiancUco, January 12, l90l. 

E. B XIOLME9, Secretary of the Ophir Silver Mining Company 



WELL, I AH DELIGHTED! 

After scribbling for years to find that with 

The American $11 Typewriter 

I can have up-to-date business methods at 
such a small cost. It is as well made as the 
highest-priced machines, but more wimple. 
Ha** stood the test: seven years without n 
competitor. Catalogue and sample ot work 
free. 

AMERICAN TYPEWRITER CO.. 
F. A, Marriott, l'ac. Coast Agt, 5>£ Kearny 
San Francisco, California, 




January 19. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



A QUESTION OF GREATNESS. 

Th« following opimoni .llrl not fln.| th. 

'olnnins of th- 

print thrm here as a further ill 

»low regarding Ihlngs nr .if t; )V Into Int 

[ ry : 

George B. Cole- The tan grates! men of lh>' • • -ntmy 
were: Kroporor WUllam, William Jennloj 
Krugcr. General Booth. Charles. B Bdwln Mark- 

ham. Lieutenant Hobson. Thomas Edison. Jonquin Miller 
and Andrew Carnegie. 

"Th' The pro III 

of rain by the use of exploahres, Christian .-.. lenoa, liquid 
nlr. adoption of vertical chirography in the public schools, 
the biogrnph. verification of palmistry. Invention of whale- 
back ships, woman's suffrage, discovery of argon, auto- 
mobiles. 

"The ten greatest books of the century were: 'Isi- 
veiled.' Blavatsky; Degeneration,' Nordau; If Christ Should 
Come to Chicago." Sheldon; Coin's Financial School,' 1 1 ,u - 
»ey; Donnelly's 'Cryptogram'; 'Progress and Poverty.' Henry 
George; Ixioking Backward,' Bellamy; Tupper'a "Proverbial 
Philosophy'; 'The Greatest Thing in the World,' Drummond; 
'The Opening of a Chestnut Burr,' Roe. 

M. J. Skelly — "The ten greatest men of the century were: 
George Washington, Amedee Joullin. Rudyard Kipling. Hen 
Most, Pope Leo XIII, James D. Phelan, Herbert Spencer. 
Morgan Shepard. Admiral Dewey, L. Du Pont Syle. 

"The greatest ideas of the century were: The nebular 
hypothesis, the manufacture of condensed milk, the bi- 
chloride of gold treatment for alcoholism, the use of hot air 
as an anaesthetic, the discovery of the affinity between 
Scotch whisky and soda, the ordinance compelling women 
to remove their hats in places of public amusement, the use 
of fishnets for interior decoration, the Australian ballot, 
invention of safety razors; foundation of the Bohemian Club. 

"The ten greatest books of the century were: Kant's 
Critique of Pure Reason'; "trilby,' Du Maurler; Kreutzer 
Sonata,' Tolstoi; 'The Green Carnation,' Hitchins; 'Robert 
Elsmere,' Ward; 'Psychopathia Sexualis,' Kraft Ebing; Ruth 
Ashmore's 'Answers to Correspondents'; 'The Perfect Man,' 
Griggs; 'The Observations of Jay, a Dog,' Shepard; 'Airy, 
Fairy Lillian,' The Duchess." 

Simeon Milsand — "The ten greatest men of the century 
were: Vargo, Heckleman, Sir Peter Neely, De Villefort, 
James Marion II, Warner Melvin, Edmond Tillottson, George 
Passing, F. . Cuthlow, Smolevitch. 

"The greatest ideas of the century were: The use of 
helium oxides in horticulture, demonstration of the objec- 
tivity of octohedroids, the multi-cellular theory of cardiac 
impulse, discovery of automatic inebriation, adoption of the 
duplicate system in modern finance, demonstration of the 
therapeutic value of odors, investigation of the thermal con- 
ditions of hell, invention of the hypnotic stool, discovery of 
the ultimate convergence of parallel lines, the nutritive 
value of human hair. 

"The ten greatest books of the century were: 'Higher 
Space and the Theory of Tessaracts,' Heckleman; 'Traite 
siir la Philosophie Abcdaricitne,' De Villefort; 'Descriptive 
Geometry,' Cuthlow; 'Origin of Persistent Materialistic Evi- 
dences,' Vargo; 'Embryonic Gonocoryuthus,' Sir Peter Neely; 
'Conventional Statistics,' Tillittson; 'Manners and Morals 
of the Mahatmas'; 'Tertiary Tendencies'; Egmont Burke's 
'Epicene Epic'; 'A Romance of Manhood.' " 

Arnold Phillips — "The ten greatest men of the century 
were: Thomas Jefferson, Terry McGovern, Daniel Webster, 
Father Yorke, Tesla, Martin Kelly, Theodore Durrant, Baron 
Von Schroeder, Tod Sloan, Bosco. 

"The greatest ideas of the century were: Discovery of 
the process for making beer by steam, Chinese exclusion 
act, hygienic properites of blue glass, invention of the cigar- 
ette, Keely motor, credit system of nickel-in-the-slot ma- 
chines, segregation of tenderloins, bromo-seltzer, shooting 
the Chutes. 

"The ten greatest books of the century were: 'David 
Harum,' Westcott; 'Germ Plasm,' Weismann; 'Shorty in 
Search of His Dad'; 'Chimmie Fadden'; 'Love Below Zero,' 
Dale; 'The Purple Cow,' Gelett Burgess; 'The Quick or the 
Dead,' Reeves; 'Poems of Passion,' Wilcox; 'Sesame and 
Lilies,' Ruskin; 'Rubaiyat,' Omar Khayyam and Porter Gar- 
nett." 




'//■ u:,a 






i -„j„„ a,..-,.-,.-,,. Capital Paid Up 2.241, 375 

London Assurance AS!U . ts \ -9,195. u. 

pita] Sub.. .Til..', i $5,000,000 

Ocean Marine S 1Pald ." 2 ,S 

City Index and Pu rchasers' Guide. 

RESTAURANTS. 

POODLE DOG Restaurant. N. 15. corner Eddy and Mason Sis.. 
I'rlvate dining and banquet rooms. Telephone. Main 429. 

A. B. Blanco & B. Brun. 

BAT STATE OYSTER HOUSE AND GRILL ROOM, 15 Stock- 
ton street and 109 O'Farrell street. N. M. Adler, 1'roprletor. 
Telephone, Main 5057. 

BERGEZ REslAURANT- Rooms for ladles and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

NEVADA RESTAURANT, 126-130 Geary street. Private roo.»3 

tor parties. 'Phone. Main 1179. Noel P. Loupy. Proprietor. 

MAISON TORTONI, French Rotisserle, 111 O'Farrell street. 
Private dining rooms; banquet hall. S. Constantinl, Pro- 
prletor. 

HOTELS. 

PALACE AND GRAND HOTELS— Connected Dv overhead pas- 
sageway; under one management. Palace Grill Rooms a fea- 
ture. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL— a quiet home centrally located; first- 
class. Wm. B. Hooper, Manager.* 

RUSS HOUSE— J. S. Toung, Proprietor. Leading business and 
family hotel. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 
W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan street. Selections on approval; any 
place in the world. 

BOILER MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Ironworks, 314-316-3*8 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 



H. Isaac Jones, M. D. Eye . Ear , Nose , 



Office — 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 
streets, 3. F. Hours, 10 a. m. to 4. p. m. 



Sunday by appointment. 



Tel. Grant 101. 



Worthington Ames 

Member Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Safe Deposit But] diner. 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1381 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, San Francisco. 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, vss AV,AR ^^ ao . m3 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-1839. These pens are " the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United StnteB 
Mb. Henry Hoe. 91 John street. New York. ' 
Sold by all stationers. 

A. B. TREAD WELL Attorneyat-Law 

(Formerly Judge Police Court No. 4) 

HAS RESUMED PRACTICE at 633 Kearny St., cor. Sacramento St. 

All legal business attended to promptly. 



Blake. Moffitt & TOWne Telephone Main 199 

Dealers in PAPER 



Blake, Moflit & Towne. Los Aneeles. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland Or. 



56-57-59-61 First street, S. F. 



Weak Men and Women ^^TalSS^JSSS 

It glveB health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 
street San Francisco. Send lor circular. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 




The army and navy ball given by La Jeunesse Club Friday 
evening was one of the prettiest affairs of the kind seen for 
many a long day. The national colors were largely used for 
decorative purposes, flowers and incandescent lights of the 
same tints — red, white and blue — appearing wherever it was 
possible to place them to advantage, and as for brass but- 
tons, there was no stint of them either. The earlier part of 
the evening was given to general dancing, and soon after 
10 the cotillion was begun under the leadership of the re- 
doubtable Lieutenant "Jackie" Haines, who came up from 
San Diego especially for that purpose. The figures were 
decidedly military and naval in character, flags, swords, 
buttons, drums, fifes and a reviewing march being among 
the distinctive features. A delicious supper was followed by 
more general dancing for a couple of hours ere good-nights 
were exchanged. Among the dinners which preceded the 
dance were those given by the Brighams, Bakers, Simpsons 
ana Mrs. H. E. Huntington. 

Mr. Thomas Crimmins, who arrived last Sunday to attend 
the wedding of his son and Miss Cole, was one of the guests 
of honor at an elaborate dinner given last Monday evening 
by Mrs. Eleanor Martin, Lieutenant Crimmins and Miss Cole 
being the chief guests. The floral decorations were very 
beautiful. American Beauty roses were used in the parlors, 
azaleas, lilies of the valley and maidenhair ferns adorning 
the table at which were seated the hostess and the three 
above named guests, Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Murphy, Mrs. 
Charles Sawtelle, the Misses Dalbier, Ella and Cornelia 
O'Connor, Florence Cole, May Josselyn, Helen Wagner; 
Messrs, Grace, J. D. Phelan, Reddick Duperu, Ed Greenway, 
J. D. Crimmins, Walter and Peter Martin. 

One of the handsomest dinners of the week -was given by 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Oxnard on Wednesday last, at which 
Mr. and Mrs. Claus Spreckels were guests of honor. Those 
asked to meet them were: Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Spreckels, 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin, Mrs. Detrick, Mr. and Mrs. Chauneey 
Winslow, Dr. and Mrs. Keeney, Allan St. John Bowie and 
Herman Oelrichs. 

Mrs. McMullin and her daughter, Mrse. Belvin, gave their 
first entertainment last Tuesday afternoon in the form of a 
small tea, to which only a limited number of ladies were 
invited. 

To-day at her Oakland residence Mrs. F. M. Smith, who 
is noted for the magnificence of her entertainments, will 
give a reception for the debut of Miss May Budge, and be- 
tween the hours of 4 and 7 p. m. the beautiful rooms of 
Arbor Villa will no doubt be crowded with guests from both 
sides of the bay. 

There was another of the delightful Friday Fortnightly 
dances last evening, and this evening Mr. and Mrs. William 
Steinhart will give a reception at the Century Club for the 
purpose of introducing their daughter, Miss Annie Steinhart, 
into society. 

On' Tuesday last at noon the marriage of Miss Charlotte 
Gashwiler and Senor Jose Robledo took place at the Colonial 
Hotel. The parlors where the ceremony was performed by 
Rev. Father Prendergast were prettily dressed with ferns 
and palms and were well filled with relatives and friends to 
witness it and afterward partake of a bridal dejeuner. The 
bride wore a most becoming gown of light fawn-colored silk 
crepe trimmed with lace and passementerie, and hat to corre- 
spond, and carried a bouquet of lilies of the valley. Both 
bride and groom were unattended. Later in the day the 
happy couple left for Del Monte, where they are passing 
their honeymoon. Another bride who, like Miss Lillie Follis, 
had a charming day for her wedding, was Miss Margaret 
Cole, whose marriage to Lieutenant Crimmins took place 
at the residence of her mother last Wednesday at noon. Miss 
Florence Cole officiated as maid of honor, and the groom had 
the support of his brother, who came from the East for the 
purpose of being best man. The wedding was a very quiet 



one, the guests not exceeding two score ;n number. The 
bride looked lovely, and besides hearty good wishes for her 
happiness was the recipient of many beautiful and valuable 
presents. 

An engagement which is causing quite a stir in Jewish 
circles is that of Miss Elsie Lilienthal to Milton Esberg, 
which was formally announced last Monday. 

The cards of Mrs. Walter Dean and her sisters, the Misses 
Hager, are out at last and are for the first and second 
Wednesdays in February. The Hagers have been very quiet 
this winter, a most unusual thing, as they are generally in 
the van when entertaining is in order; hence the impatience 
manifested among their friends to greet them as hostesses. 
Mrs. James A. Robinson and Miss Elena are at home on 
Mondays in their pretty rooms in the new Hotel Knicker- 
bocker, in Van Ness avenue. 

Frank Carolan is at home again. Mrs. Frank will probably 
arrive in time for the Mardi Gras ball. 

Miss Susie Blanding has been visiting her cousin, Mrs. J. 
B. Haggin, in New York, and las- week was one of the "assist- 
ants" at the first of a series of receptions to be given by Mrs. 
Haggin at her home in Gotham. Miss Susie will soon be 
at home again in San Francisco, and, Dice versa, Miss Flor- 
ence Breckenridge is on the eve of departure for the East, 
whither she goes under the chaperonage of her aunt, Mrs. 
Will Tevis, and they will remain in New York several weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Flood left hurriedly for the East 
last week, called away by the serious illness of Mrs. Flood's 
widowed sister residing in Kansas. Miss Jenny Flood will 
postpone her departure until after they return. Miss Bessie 
Bowie, having decided upon an operatic career, will go East 
for musical instruction, and will probably accompany Miss 
Flood in her private car when that lady takes her next trip 
across the continent. 

When a person has once acquired a taste for travel it is 
difficult for him to remain contentedly for any length of time 
at any one place, as, for instance, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Payot. 
who have spent the last few years in touring the world. 
Mrs. W. J. Irwin is another instance, and early next month 
she will take wings again, this time for New York, where 
she goes to add still more to the treasures she has already 
secured for her new home on Washington street. She will 
go via New Orleans, reaching there in time to take in the 
Mardi Gras festivities, and anticipates an absence of several 
weeks. The last news anent Major and Mrs. Catherwood- 
Darling is that they are likely to spend another year abroad 
and are about starting for Egypt. We occasionally have a 
visit from a stray duke en route to or from some of her 
Britannic Majesty's colonial possessions, but duchesses are 
a rarity on the Coast; hence the presence of the young 
Duchess of Manchester, accompanied by the duke, will be 
something worthy of mention. Papa Zimmerman and Hon. 
Mr. Lambert are members of the ducal traveling party. 

The flutter which has been agitating society as to whether 
the bride would be received by "the family" or not, and par 
consequence by that august body, has been to no purpose, 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Oxnard having given our city the go-by 
and decided to make Paris their home for the future. 

The many friends of the pretty buds, the Misses Alma and 
Gladys McClung, will regret their withdrawal from society, 

A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX QOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 




Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Moth hatches. hash and Skin Dts- 
eoseS. mid every blemish on beauty, 
and defies detection. It has stood the 
test of 51 years and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfei t of similar name. 
Dr. L. A. Sayre Bald to a lady of the 
haut-ton (a patient): "As you Indies 
will use them. I recommend 'Gour 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
by all druggists nnd Fancy-goods 
Dealers in the United States, Canada* 
ii > 'i Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
87 Great Jones street, N. Y, 



January 12. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



not alone for the loss they will bo to the Swim, but for Iho 
raoso. the death of their distinguished grandfather 
B«Terly Cole. 

Tho same round of >ntlnues at th- 

Monte, where the gulf winds hare consplr 
harsh blast of winter and th.' summer season Is weU-Dlgfa 
<ontlnuous. Many of the fall and summer guests 
malnlng and the hotel register shows no diinunltlon of 
despite the fart thnt the holiday Maaon Is ov. 
January and February an i poor months by hotel 

men. 

U F. Lastreto has been honored by his appointment as 
Consul for Nicaragua, vice Mr. Lacaro, Mr. Lastreto is now 
an able representative of two of the South American Re- 
publics, viz., Ecuador and Nicaragua. 

The Mt. Zion Hospital Association is busy preparing for 
a great charity ball to be given at the Palace Hotel. S 
day evening, February 2d. The Maple. Marble, and Supper 
Rooms are to be used. It is the first event of the kind given 
in years. The people interested are planning it on the lines 
of the New York charity dances, which are among the 
most enjoyable functions of tne season. A great social 
success is expected, and a financial one most earnestly hoped 
for. Tickets may be procured from the patronesses, who are 
Mrs. Fred L. Castle, Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Mrs. J. Rosenstirn, 
Mrs. William Haas. Mrs. William Frank, Mrs. J. Neustadter, 
Mrs. William Greenebaum, Mrs. I. W. Hellman, Jr., Mrs. M. 
Brown. Mrs. P. N. Aronson. Mrs. A. Brown, Mrs. Sig. Fetich- 
twanger, Mrs. William Gerstle, Mrs. J. B. Levison, Mrs. 
Theodore Lilienthal, Mrs. H. Heyneman, Mrs. J. Hyman, 
Mrs. Leon Kauffman, Mrs. L. Siegel, Mrs. H. Lippman, Mrs. 
M. S. Levy, Mrs. J. Naphtaly, and Mrs. I. Rusk. 

Very little of the harsh weather of the city gets to the 
beautiful hills of Marin county, where many of San Fran- 
cisco's fashionable people are staying at the Hotel Rafael. 
It is a rare privilege to get among the flowers and sunshine 
by a mere ferry-boat ride from town. Many tourists from 
the East are including the Rafael in their itinerary. 



Camelline is made for the complexion, as Adelina 

Patti, Mrs. Kendall, Ellen Terry and famous beauties a 
legion have found before endorsing it. It soothes and nour- 
ishes the skin and even corrects the evil effects of cheap cos- 
metics. 



Artistic Hardwood Grilles. 
Made to order. Prices reasonable. Pacific Grille Co., 
Building, N. E. Corner Sutter ard Kearny streets. 



Adams' 



Our Annual 
Reduction Sale 

20 % Discount 
and over 

2H Art Goods $ Pictures 
Crockery $ Glassware 

Commencing 

Honday, Jan. 21st 

S. & G. Gump CO. "3 Geary St. 



'"I Vintage will not be in your market until 
APRIL 1, 1001. 








^jBkccsich 




Full Quart Bottles . . $1.25 
One Gallon Jugs . . . 3.80 
Half Gallon Jugs . . 2.00 
Twice its price will buy none better. 

The San Francisco 
Jockey Club. 

Third meeting: from Monday, January 21, to Saturday, Feb. 9, inclusive 

AT TANFORAN PARK, 

Six laces each day including Hurdle races and Steeplechases. 

The Coney Island Handicap, Wednesday, January 23. 

The Winter Handicap. Saturday, January 26, 

The Washington Park Handicap, Wednesday, Jan. 30. 

The Eclipse Stakes. Saturday, February 2. 

The Alexandra Park Handicap, "Wednesday, Feb. 6. 

The California Oaks, Saturday, February 9. 

Trains leave Third and Townsend atreeta for Tanforan Park at 7, 10:46. 
11:30 a. m., 12:30, 1, 1:30 and 2 p.m. Valencia stree" 5 minutes later, TrainB 
returning: to the city at 4:15 p, m„ and immediately after the last race. 
Admission to the grounds, including" railroad fare, 81.25. 

SPECIAL — The 2 p. m. ia for the convenience of those not wishing: to 
reach the track in time for the first race. 

Milton S. Latham, Secretary. 



College San Rafael 



For Young Ladies 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominlo, 
Full collegia course of studies. A boardlm? school of highest 
crade. Superb modern building:. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located In the lovely Mag:noHa Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San Rafael, On). 



THE PACIFIC COAST REGULAR 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 



Season Begins May 1, 1901. 



Four years' course. University graduates allowed one year advanced 
standing:. All lectures between 6 p. m. and 10:30 p.m. Address, Colleee 
Building-, 818 Howard St. 



H. J. Stewart 



Teacher of Vocal and 
Instrumental Music 2 

Studio : 1406 Van Ness Avenue 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 




ub 



mmm 



wibeams 



■jMUj^ayji 



3 



Stolen From Thieves. 

Poverty-stricken suitor — "Sir, I have come to ask you for 
your daughter's hand." The Merchant Prince — "I am quite 
willing to believe you love my daughter, but I am anxious 
to know why you have brought your kodak at such an 
inopportune time." Suitor — "I'm passionately fond of pho- 
tcgraphy; besides I am entered in an amateur photographers' 
competition, and I wished to take a snap at your astonished 
face when you heard my proposal. It will secure me a prize. 
Thus I shall profit either way." The Merchant Prince — 
"My son, come to my arms; I shall make you a partner in 
my house." 

A circus paid a flying visit to a small Northern town not 
long ago, and the price of admission was sixpence, children 
under ten years of age half-price. It was Edith's tenth birth- 
day, and her Brother Tom, aged thirteen, took her in the 
afternoon to see the show. Arrived at the door, he put down 
ninepence and asked for two front seats. "How old is the 
little girl?" asked the money-taker, doubtfully. "Well," 
replied Master Tom, "this is her tenth birthday, but she was 
not born until rather late in trie afternoon." The money- 
taker accepted the statement and handed him the tickets, 
but it was a close shave. 

Mr. Johnson. — Did you remark at de clu-j last night dat I 
looked like a lobster, suh? Mr. Jackson — No, suh; I am 
no backbiter, sah! If I wished to cast any aspersions upon 
de lobster family, I should go right to a fish market and do 
it straight to deyr faces, sah! Dat's my style, suh! 

A certain beggar was accused of a crime and brought be- 
fore an Abyssinian judge. The judge commanded that the 
whole of his face should be blackened, and that he should 
walk about the city all the day long in that guise. The beg- 
gar said: "Oh, judge, make not the whole of my face black, 
but the half of it, lest all the city should take me for an 
Abyssinian judge." This speech caused the judge to smile, 
and he forgave the beggar his offense. 

At a recent spiritualistic meeting in Wichita, Kan., a few 
weeks ago the spirit of Elijah Crosser was called for. Elijah 
Grosser had died many years before, but was remembered 
for his immense stature, six feet five inches. A voice in the 
darkness said he was Elijah. "Are you an angel, Lige?" 
"Yes," came the answer. "Are you an angel Lige?" "Yes." 
The questioner paused, evidently having exhausted his fund 
of questions, and then suddenly inquired: "What do you 
measure from tip to tip, Lige?" 

Husband — Mary, now you're in a good humor, tell me why 
you don't blow up the girls as you do me? Wife — Oh, there's 
a very good reason for that — they won't stand it. 

"Sir," said the young man, "I ask for your daughter's 
hand." "young man," replied the father, "I am not dispos- 
ing of her in sections." 

Grocer — Well, little one, what can I do for you? Jenny — 
Please, sir, mamma says will you change a dollar for her, and 
she'll give you the dollar to-morrow. 

Clara — Mr. Nicefellow said my face was classic. What did 
he mean? Dora — Oh, anything old is classic, you know. 

"Well," said the little boy after listening to the story of 
the bull in the china shop, "I can't understand what the bull 
wanted to go in for." "Maybe," replied the bright sister, 
"there was an auction going on there and the red flag at- 
tracted him." 



BANKING 



Why is it that the best-dressed, best behaved, best 

educated men call for the Argonaut brand of whiskey in 
preference to all others? The answer is simple. Argonaut 
whiskey is a gentleman's drink and gentlemen recognize 
the fact. It is distilled with reference to the consumer as 
well as from a commercial standpoint, and as a result it is 
the best in consistency, the best in flavor and the best in 
effect of any whisky on the market. It stimulates but 
does not intoxicate, and it makes no drunkards. 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. 82.000,000 Surplus, $1,000,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits. October 1. 1900. 83.511.068.82. 

WILLIAM ALVORD .President I CHARLES R. BISHOP, Vlce-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. PRENTISS SMITH Ass't Cashier I 1. F. MOULTON 2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York — Messrs. Laidlaw & Co.: the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore — The National Exchange Bank. Boston, — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago — Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 
Virginia City. Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Disconto OeseUschaft. China. Japan, and East Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit Issued available in all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET. S. F. 

Deposits July 1. 1900. 826.952,875 Reserve Fund 8218.593 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 439.608 

E. B. PO ND, P resident W. C. B. DeFREMERY. Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Henry F. Allen. Thomas Magee. W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller. Robert Watt. George C. Boardman. Daniel E. Martin. Jacob 
Barth. E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in cheoks payable 
in San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 8 p. in., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock^ 

Wells Fargo X Go. Bank 

N. E. Cob. Sansomb and Sutter Sts. 
JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WAD8WORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KINO, Manager F. L. LIPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER. Second Assistant Cashier. 

Capital. Surplus and Undivided Profits Dec. 31. 1000 88,630,223.8s 

Branches— New York City. H. B. Parsons. Cashier: Salt Lake City. J. E. 

Dooly. Cashier: Portland. Or.. R. M. Dooly. Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Chrlsteson. Oliver Eldridge, 

Henry E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook. 

John Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCI9CO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 52.2C3.559.17 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1,000 000 00 

Deposits Dec. 31. 1900 .29.589.864.13 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A. H. R 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

[en. SMnhart, E. Rohte H. B. Russ, N. Ohlandt, John Lloyd, and I. N 
Walter. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny. Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital 8300,000 

Jambs D. Phelan, President S. G. Muepht, Vice-President 

Geo bob A. Stoby, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper. James 
Muffin. Frank J. Sullivan. Robert McElroy. Chas. S. Neal. James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells. Fargo & Co.. or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building Xt Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALLFORNIA 

Subscribed Capital. .$10,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..$210,000 
Paid-in-Capital 1,500.000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Pdbpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members el vine first liens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent. Interest on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office— 222 Sansome St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Wm. Cohbin. Secretary and General Manager 

Crocker-Woolworth National Bank 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

CORNER MARKET. MONTGOMERY AND POST ST8. 

Paid-up-Capital 81.000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kline. Cashier 

W.E.Brown. Vice-President W. Gregg. Jr.. Assistant Cs.hler 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E Brown. C. E. Green, G, W. 

Kline. HenryJ. Crocker, G. W. Soott. 




SAN FRANCItCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 



A RHYME ROSE. 
.ren.-<" Dray, In R>»l anil W . .1 

i fain would send thee dew-wet flowers — 

Too far apart we bide, 
Thou on the strand ili.it greets the <lawn 

I t>y the snndown tide; 
So up the ladder of my dreams 

A Romeo. I climb 
And to thy open casement bear 

A little rose of rhyme. 

Its petals gleam, its inmost heart 

A scent divine exhales — 
It bloomed within a bower hung 

With nests of nightingales! 
But O, to wed it to thy lute, 

And some sweet vesper time 
To tell thee all the rapture of 

This little rose of rhyme! 



ANTONIO. 

(Arthur Gray Butler, in The Living Aee.l 

In youth, when idle hearts to love inclined 

Flit on from flower to flower, love passed me by; 
This one the senses charmed, but not the mind; 

That one the judgment pleased, but not the eye. 
So seeming inward cold and outward blind, 

I lived, love's baffled votary. Swift would fly 
The dream I clasped at; till I left behind 

Fair youth, and thought, sweet love unfound, to die. 
But now when love has found me, 'tis too late; 

As stars at dawn love yields to nobler Are; 
Lo, honor calls, the summoner of fate; 

Dead in its ashes lies extinct desire. 
Sound trumpets, sound! Blow bugle's maddening breath! 
Child, we have loved too late. Farewell! my bride is Death! 



ON SHORE. 

(By Arthur Kelehuro, in East and West.) 
The white gulls flash in the outer bay, 
The sails are flushed with the dying day, 
O wind that creeps from the open sea, 
Do you bear mine own again to me? 

O steadfast lights that watch the main," 
Make ye his pathway very plain, 
O faithful stars above the sea, 
Show him the port where he would be! 

Across the dunes I hear the roar 
Of the restless surf that walks the shore; 
The lamps are lit, the streets grow dim 
And my hungry heart cries out for him. 



A MEMORY. 

(By James B. Kenyon, in Lippincotts ) 
Betwixt the blown sands and the flowing sea 
We stood at nightfall. In the hollow west 
The ultimate torch of day flared for a space, 
Sank and expired. A wind whined round the dunes, 
And ragged shreds of vapor, salt and chill, 
Went by us in the flaw. We had no tear 
To shed, no word to say. Our stricken heads 
Were bowed together, and her streaming hair 
Swept o'er my cheek. Swiftly the gray night fell, 
And like a huge hand blotted sea and shore. 
I heard her garments rustle in the gloom: 
A moment on my breast she laid her brow. 
Then turned, and from the darkness where she 
A sob came down the gust. 'Twas ages since, 
But memory still broods on that black hour. 



fled 



DE AMICITIA. 

(By Herbert Ketchum in Lippincott's.) 
Good is the outward sign and word 
That friends give each to each; 
But better still, the thing that is 
Beyond the grasp of speech. 



BANKING 



London and San Francisco Bank. > 
it oai rroiun \ vnu 

UK tO OPKK , ,|.. n 

Ca|.1l*l Author!*, i 

. •»..!.. ' hriatUn di Cttsvle* If* 

lohn I It'xs-nrri, Hon l"i 
man n. Kiilcout. H»n PtMotmo; tithor Barf raw, London. 

In«i>coIi.r of Rr*nche«, lin-inv Krifilericli. 

Aerni- in Now York. Ifexn. J. P, ■Totvm A Ob, 
MH UfOHBBi Portlond, Orocon; Taoonw, Wuhtnston. 
Lotion ofl orodll l«oood ovotlohlo lor trmoolon and ibo parotuuM <•( moi 
ahonffloa In may oltj <•* the n orld Dool In loroltpi and hoove 

Account* of country lumko rtotlrod, Tomu on oppUootlon. 

W. MAikl\Tii-ll,M:lh, lv .,r 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated Tlie Hunk <>i Rriti-li ( ..luinhta 

HEAD OFFICE-TV to, 

Paid I'p Oapilal. 18.000,000. Remer 0,000. 

AicK-eeate Resources ovortB6.000.0D0, 

DIRECTORS— Hon Geo. A Cox, President; B K. Walker, Cienornl 
Manager: J. II. I'liininicr. Aflflt, Qcncral Manager- 

LONDON OFPIOR— 60 I ombard si . e c , 8. Cameron Alexander. Uanaffer 
RBW YORK OFFICE— lr. Exchange Plaoo. \\-\ Laird and Win 

A cent*. 

BRANCHES 

Ontario, Ontario; Qoebeoi Montrci*' : Manitoba: Wlnnlpee: Yukon 
Pietrict: Dawson, While Horse; British Columbia: \tlin, Oranbrook, 
Pernio, Greenwood, Kamloops. Nana! mo, Nelson, New Weatmlnslor, 
Rowland. Sandon. Vancouver. Victoria. In the United States—New York! 
N. Y. San Francisco. Cat Seattle. Wash Pottland, Ore- Sfcao-Way, Alaska'' 
Bankers in London — The Bank o! Scotland: HoBSTfl. Smith. Payne Si Smith i 
Bankers in New York— The American Exchange National Bunk. 
Aeents in Cliicae"— The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans. 
—The Commercial National [link. 

San Francisco Office: Walter Powell. Manager. A. BZatn*, As-it. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Coh. Sansohe and Suttee Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 Pald-Up Capital, te.000,000 

Reserve Fund. 8925.000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street. London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 

Limited. No. 10 Wall street. N. Y, : Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres Sc Cle. 17 

Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 

Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIO. GREENBBAUM C. ALTSCHTJL. Managers. 
R. ALTSCHDL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco. 
Ja8. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pikece Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL. 8500,000 \ 

DTRECTORS—James K. Wilson, Wm. J. Dut ton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Ge o 
.K. Pone. H, E. Huntington, Henry Pierce. C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank. Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.: Chicago—Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City—First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan. Harjes & Co, 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital. $1,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, 83<i0,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of Individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and savings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers — F. Kronenbere, President; W-_A- Frederick, vIce-Presldent: H. 
Brunner, Ca*hier 

Board of Directors— F. Kronenberc. W. A. Frederick, Fred A- Kuhls. E. 
A. Dentcke, A. G. Wieland, Fred Woerner, J. C. Rued, Fred C. Slebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office: — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized 86,000.000 Paid Up 81,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund... 700.0C0 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchanee and bullion 

IGN. STELNHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomery St., Mills Building;. 



Interest paid on deposits. 



William Alvord 
William Baheook 
Adam Grant 



Loans made. 

DIRECTORS. 

R. L. Abbot. Jr. 
O, T> Baldwin 

W. S.! Jones 



II. If. Hewlrll, 
E. J. MoCutohen 
R. H. Pease 



22 

"V^OU would like the lamp- 
chimneys that do not 
amuse themselves by pop- 
ping at inconvenient times, 
wouldn't you ? 

A chimney ought not to 
break any more than a tum- 
bler. A tumbler breaks 
when it tumbles. 

Macbeth' s "pearl top" and 
" pearl glass " — they don't 
break from heat, not one in a 
hundred ; a chimney lasts for 
years sometimes. 

Our " Index " describes all lamps and iheir 
proper chimneys. With it you can always order 
the right size and shape of chimney for any lamp. 
We mail it FREE to any one who writes for it. 

Address Macbeth, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

The Marking of 

Lady Colhvirst. 



The population for thirty miles 
around Bradford Castle had grown 
gray, had aged prematurely, had as- 
sumed a "dogged" cast of features, 
under the continual naggings, prod- 
dings, revolutions, reforms, and rear- 
rangements of "Old Nosey." 

London had "endured" during his 
reign in Parliament: the whole world 
had suffered its "three days' terror" 
at the hands of the "Busybody Thank- 
less." No man had ever done more 
genuine harm to a community, with 
nosing around, stirring up "wasps' 
nests," and "setting things straight," 
than had the Duke of Colhurst. 

At one time, while traveling in the 
United States, he had nearly precipi- 
tated an international struggle; in 
fact, the British Embassador was 
handed his papers at Washington for 
"insulting demeanor" in trying to de- 
fend his countryman's apparent effron- 
tery, though the Duke had acted with 
the best intentions in the world. 

The Duke was dead. 

The world mourned the death of 
the Duke of Colhurst, and eulogized 
charities. But "Old Nosey." — no, his 
death was not mourned; the world 
gave a shrug of joy, "the sun came 
out," Bradfordshire arose from its 
lethargy. 

Then came the reading of the will. 
Alas, the sun went back behind the 
clouds. "Old Nosey," was only dead 
in the body, — his deeds still lived on. 

Thus ran a portion of the will: — 

If, at the end of three years, my 
above named son shall not have mar- 
ried Vera Helen Beresford. the daugh- 
ter of James R. Beresford, who lives 
in New York, U. S. A., then such part 
of my estate shall be set apart as will 
yield him £2,000 a year, and the re- 
mainder be distributed among the 
charities hereinafter mentioned. 

If Vera Helen Beresford refuses to 
marry my son. then he shall retain 
only the income before stated, and her 
father shall not receive the portion 
of my estate assigned to him. 

Such was "Old Nosey's" coup <lc Iri- 
omphe. Why had he disarranged his 
family's calculations? Why had he 
arbitrarily determined the fate of a 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

little lady he had seen but once in his 
life, and then but for a few hours, on 
an occasion when he had dined with 
the Beresfords while in New York? 

"The old meddler, — why couldn't he 
let people marry whom they choose? 
No one has a right to dictate other 
people's personal affairs. I wish papa 
had never brought him here." 

So spoke Miss Helen Beresford be- 
tween choking sobs, when the con- 
ditions of the Duke's will were first 
made known to her. 

"Couldn't I be nice to him, but what 
I must marry his son?" she continued. 

"But, my dear young lady," pleaded 
the lawyer who had been commis- 
sioned to impart these terms to the 
Beresford family, "this is not an un- 
fortunate affair. You will be Lady 
Colhurst, — mistress of one of the larg- 
est estates in England, and " 

"Judge Hallowell, I am an Ameri- 
can girl. I don't care to be 'Lady' any- 
body, and I do not wish to marry an 
Englishman, particularly one whom I 
have never seen." 

"But the young duke is almost an 
American," explained the judge. "He 
owns and has operated a sheep ranch 
in Colorado for the past six years. 
Then, you don't luwe to marry any- 
body. I am instructed to prevail up- 
on you to visit Bradfordhurst in Sep- 
tember, that you may meet and be- 
come acquainted with the family, and 
possibly the young duke himself. If 
you do not like him, or do not like the 
people, then my strongest advise 
would be, don't marry. Now, what is 
your answer? Will you go to Brad- 
fordhurst? Don't take things so seri- 
ously, my dear young lady. Will you 
go?" 

"Under those circumstances, yes." 

"Will you be ready by the first of 
the month, Miss Beresford? That 
will give you ten days: time enough, 
is it not, to prepare yourself for the 
trip?" 

"Yes, I'll be ready by that time." 

And then the lawyer left the family 
to discuss the sudden change in its 
affairs. 

The following days were spent in 
preparation, and the early morning 
of the first of the month found the 
entire family at the pier to bid the 
young lady Godspeed. 

Ah, that was a serious moment for 
many persons, when the deck hands 
shouted "All ashore!" — when the long 
shaky gangways slid back upon the 
pier, and the great whistle began to 
roar, and the mighty screws churned 
the water as the great, stupid mass 
of steel shook off the bonds of leth- 
argy, became a thing of life, and 
started for its distant haven, thous- 
ands of miles away, and this bonnie, 
brown-haired lass was starting on a 
voyage to ports on the distant shores 



January 19, 1901. 



$2.50 SENT FREE 



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Specialist, Franklin Miles, M. 

D., LL B., will send $2.50 

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Free to Our Readers. 



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New and Keniarkable Treatment for these dis- 
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of time no one knows where! This sud- 
den change in her affairs, the fact that 
she was no longer her own director, 
that she could not obey her own im- 
pulses, that that blessed gift, dear to 
the hearts of all Americans, male or 
female, was no longer hers, depressed 
her; that she was going to a strange 
land and a strange people, over- 
powered her. With maiden simplicity 
she began to cry. 

Now, a woman, of herself, with face 
severe and a quiet manner, may go a 
long way and never make a friend. 
She may be lonesome, sick, her trou- 
bles innumerable, and even though 
it is known, people will hesitate to 
offer sympathy or assistance. But a 
woman in tears! The whole world 
is her friend, the whole world bows 
its head. Tears are a bond of brother- 
hood provided by nature, a signal 
from the distressed to the more for- 
tunate. Nor was this instance any 
exception. 

"Why. isn't this Miss Beresford?" in- 
quired a low, sympathetic voice at 
her elbow. 

Turning, our young lady failed to 
recognize the owner of the voice, a 
sweet-faced girl of twenty. 

"Don't you know me? My name is 
Turner. We met last winter at Eve- 
lyn Bridgman's. You recollect, don't 
you?" 

"Your pardon, Miss Turner. I re- 
member, now. I hope you will excuse 
my woebegone appearance. You 
know how it is when you leave your 
home all alone for the first time, don't 
you?" 

"All alone? Do you mean to tell 




January 19. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



a 



mo that you are on (hi* (real steamer 
all alone, and you arc icolng to 
ill by your- 

II, I have a oialil. an olil servant 
lit, to look after me. i>ut 
■r.lly company," replied 
what amn 

• n her Dew-found f: 

"Well, you shall not bp alone long. 
There an' ten In our party. 
right along with me and meet my 
irk. ami nh. please, you look 
all right. Everybody ought t.i have 
tears In his eyes on li great- 

est and best city In the world. Come 
along." 

Miss Vera was properly introduced. 
and soon became one in mind and 
body of the merry party of pleasure 
seekers. Of her personal affairs, she 
gave small inkling, save that she was 
going to visit friends somewhere In 
England. 

Now, there is a peculiar friendship 
between that hoary old sea-god. Nep- 
tune, and his fair relation, Venus, thai 
dates back to a certain morn in the 
dreamy past, when the fairest of god- 
desses left the sea to rule supreme 
forevermore on land. The winged boy 
Cupid, does the bidding of the sea 
deity quite as readily as that of his 
mother, in consequence thereof. 
Hours supplant days in the languid 
life of modern steamship travel, and 
not many of these had passed ere 
Cupid recognized in the movement and 
action of two young people a challenge 
to his power and reputation. Ah, be- 
ware young people! This artful fel- 
low; no respecter of human plots and 
plans is he. Don't hope to toy with 
him and escape unscathed, particu- 
larly on the sea, for there he is 
strongest. That old match-maker, 
Moon, the Zephyr, the many-mooded 
Ocean, — each of these vies in tender- 
ing assistance to Cupid in his mis- 
chievousness. 

* * * * * * 

Ah, had somebody given this warn- 
ing to Miss Vera when Ferdinand 
Sedgwick volunteered his services as 
guide, the first night out of New 
York! 

"Have you been up on deck yet, 
Miss Beresford?" asked Mr. Sedgwick. 

"No, not yet. I've scarcely been 
anywhere. Miss Turner and her 
mother are not as good sailors as I; 
they have been confined to their room 
ever since we left Fire Island. I feel 
the least bit queer myself. The walk 
on deck would do me good." 

Now, the wind was blowing the least 
bit — and to its melodious moaning the 
sea was bound to dance, ever so lit- 
tle — and the sea's partner? — why, 
there was nobody there save the giant 
ship, — and when ships dance, passen- 
gers, particularly those who are used 
to the steady old land, have to hold 
on. Ah, mischievous Cupid! You are 
to blame for this! 

"Miss Beresford, let me offer you 
my arm. You don't make rapid pro- 
gress alone." 

This offer was graciously accepted. 
How they went forward to see the 
men on lookout, and aft to see „.ie 



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quartermaster road the log, and then 
amidships to look down the engine- 
room hatch, is of little Interest to 
any but themselves. At length, hav- 
ing agreed to breakfast together, they 
retired to their respective staterooms, 
for the night, but not to sleep — at least 
not In Miss Vera's Instance. 



The events of the day, the future 
awaiting development — each of these 
was more than enough to overcome 
physical needs, blowly she reviewed 
the events just passed — it almost 
seemed days since she had arisen that 
morning — then the sailing of the 
steamer, her meeting with the Tur- 
ners, and lastly, her promenade with 
Mr. Sedgwick. 

Long she dwelt on their last topic 
and its attendant side thoughts. 

Mr. Sedgwick was English. By any 
possible means could the young duke 
be as nice as he? What would hap- 
pen if she should fall in love with 
some man — say Mr. Sedgwick — at this 
time? Ah, this was serious; she must 
not allow herself to think of such 
things. She had no right to fall in 
love. She was different from other 
people. This awful difference — that is, 
awful from her point of view — deeply 
affected her. She assumed a vail of 
martyrdom, pictured herself a sacri- 
fice to the whims of an old man, and 
in this strange frame of mind went 
to sleep. 

She was awakened the next morn- 
ing by the stewardess, with a note 
from Mr. Sedgwick reminding her of 
the breakfast engagement. 

All that day and all the next those 
two were together. Wise heads be- 
gan to smile. By the time Mrs. Tur- 
ner and her daughter were able to 
go on deck, the gossips had settled an 
engagement and a hasty marriage, 
and rushed to them to break the 
news. 

But poor Vera! No frivolous mat- 
ter was this to her. She admitted to 
herself that she was in love with Mr. 
Sedgwick, and was satisfied that he 
was very much in love with her, and 
that it was only a question with him 
of the proper moment in which to 
propose. She had warded off this pro- 
posal with all the tact that a woman 
could master. She was tiring, how- 
ever, of this unequal contest against 
herself and this very persistent young 
man. She would let him propose; 
she would make the opportunity, and 
then explain her position. It was only 
fair to him that she should do this — 
so she reasoned. 

The opportunity came the next 
evening. They were leaning on the 
rail aft, very close to each other. Mr. 
Sedgwick started the conversation. 

"Miss Beresford, we haven't known 
each other a very long time, have 
we?" 



ill, no: about four days now. 
isn't it. Mr. Sedgwick! 

"Yes. its only four days, but It 
seems mucb longer than that to mc. 
If I had known you for years and years 
I couldn't think any more of yon. I 
— am very much in love with you. Miss 
— a — Vera, and I hope that at least I 
am not distasteful to you?" 

"No, Mr. Sedgwick, you are not dis- 
tasteful to me; I like you very much; 
hut when it comes to love — ah! that 
is another matter. It is not for me 
to love, — at least, not for the pres- 
ent." 

"Not to love? Why? Are you en- 
gaged to someone else? There should 
be no other reason.' - 

"Mr. Sedgwick, I'll tell you my un- 
fortunate position, and then I think 
you will understand. A certain old 
man died in England a short time ago, 
and in his will he said that, unless 
I accepted his son, and unless his son 
consented to marry me, the son would 
be disinherited. Now, I've never seen 
this son, and it's only after much per- 
suasion that I've consented to visit 
the family seat to see the family 
and be seen by them before legal ac- 
tion is brought to break the will. 
Until I am released, however, I can- 
not consider the word love, Mr. Sedg- 
wick." 

"Well, Miss Vera, might I ask the 
name of the young man?" 

With some hesitation she answered, 
"He is known as the Duke of Col- 
hurst." 

"The what?" he cried, "the Duke 
of Colhurst? Why, I'm the only Duke 
of Colhurst in England. Why. I'm go- 
ing home now to Bedfordshire to 
hear father's will read." 

For many moments that portion 
of the deck resounded with the hys- 
terical explanations of two very happy 
young persons. Love will find a way, 
and Cupid is not such a bad fellow 
after all. — Katheryn Leiter in Success. 



"Why are you always pressed for 
money?" "It is owing to others." — 
Yale Record. 



EVERY WOMAN 



is interested and should know 



■ 



about the wonderful 

MARVEL SflB8 NG 

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Ask your druggist for N. 
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11 nt\ 1.1,. accepi no 
other, hut s*-ii.l stamp for Illus- 
trated book— hhjiIcmI. It gives full 
particulars ami rllrei lions inv:iluaMe 
Wlndlen ItlAllfKIi fO- 

593 Mission street, San Francisco, Cal. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 



Southern Pacific Co. —Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at 8AN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market Sbreet] 



leave] 



From January 1, 1901 



[arrive 



7:3} a Benlcla. Sulsun, Elmlra. Vacavllle, Rumsey, and Sacramento.. 7:45 p 

7 30 A Davis. Woodland. Knights Landing, Marysvllle. Oroville- 7:45 P 

7:30a Atlantic Express. Ogden and East 12:15 P 

8 OJa Martinez. San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa. Oallstoga, Santa Rosa..... 6:15 P 

S:00 a Niles, Livermore, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton 7:15 P 

S:3Ja Shasta Express— Davis. Williams \for Bartlett Sprlnes), Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland 7:45 P 

8:30 A San Jose, Llvermore. Stockton, lone, Sacramento. PlacerrlLle. 

Marysvllle. Chlco. Red Bluff. 4:15 P 

8:30 A Oakdale. Chinese, Sonora, Carters 4:15 p 

9:u0 A Haywards, Nlles, and way stations 11:45 A 

9: It a Los Angeles Express— Martinez, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton. 

Merced, Fresno, and Los Angeles 7:15 p 

9:3ll a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 5:45 p 

I": A The Overland Limited— Oeden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago 6:45 p 

linn) a Nlles. Stockton, Sacramento. Mendota, Fresno. Hanford, 

Visalia.Porterville 4:15 P 

11:00 A Llvermore, Sanger, Goshen Junction, Bakersfield, Los 

Angeles 

tl.-OO p Sacramento River Steamers t5:00 A 

3:0u p Haywards. Nlles, and way stations 5:45 p 

4^00 p Martinez. San Ramon. Vallejo, Napa, Callstoga, Santa Rosa 9:15 A 

4:00 p Benicia. Winters, Sacramento. Woodland. Knight's Landing 

Marysvllle. Oroville 10:45 A 

4:30 p Haywards. Nile's and San Jose |8:45 a 

5:00 p Nlles. Llvermore. Stockton. Lodi 10:45 a 

#5:00 p Sunset Limited. El Paso, New Orleans and East C10:15 A 

5:00 p The Owl Limited. Tracy. Fresno. Bakersfield. SaugUB for 

Santa Barbara. Los Aneeles 10:15 A 

5:90 p New Orleans Express— Bakersfield. Santa Barbara. Los An- 
eeles, Demine, El Paso, New Orleans, and East 7:45 a 

600 p Hay-wards, Nlles, and San Jose.. 7:45 a 

t6:0u p Vallejo 11 :45 a 

tf:00 P Oriental Mail— Oeden, Cheyenne. Omaha, Chicaeo 12:15 p 

6:00 p Oriental Mall— Oeden. Denver. Omaha, Chicaeo 4:15 P 

7:00p Oreeon and California Express, Sacramento, Marysvllle, Red- 
dine. Portland Pueet Sound and East 8:45 A 

8:05 p San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez and way stations ll:4"i a 

J8:05P Vallejo 7:i5 r 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauee). (Foot of Market St.) 

8:15 a Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek. Santa 

Cruz and way stations 6:20 P 

t2:15p Newark, Centerville, San Jose. New Alraaden. Felton. Boul- 
der Creek. Santa Cruz, and principal way stations tl0:50 a 

4 :15 p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 8:50 A 

Q9: 30 p Hunters' Excursion. San Jose, an-l Way Stations I7:20p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— 17:15, 9:00. and 11:00 
A.M. 1:00.3:00, 5:00. P.M. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— 16 :00. t3:00. t$.05, 10:00 a. m. 12:00, 
2:00. 4 :00. *5:15 P. M. ^ 

Coast Division (Broad Gauee). (Third and Townsend streets). 

t6:10A Ocean View. South San FranclBCo t6:30 P 

7:00A San Jose and waystations (New Almaden Wednesday only) 1:30 P 

9:00 a San Jose. TresPinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles. 

San Luis Obispo, Surf, Lompoc. and principal waystations 4:10 P 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations 6:35 a 

11:30 a San Jose and way stations 5:30 P 

t2:45p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara. San 
Jose, Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove 1 10:36 A 

|3-30p San Jose and Way Stations 7:30 P 

|4:15p San Jose and Principal Way Stations „ 9:45 A 

T5.-00 p San Jose. Los Gatos. and Principal Way Stations t9:00 a 

5:30 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 8:35 A 

6:30 p San Jose and Way Stations t«:00 A 

flll:45 p San Jose and Way Stations - . 7:30 p 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted. 

t Sundays only. q Mondays. Wednesdays. Fridays. 

c Tuesdays. Thursdays, Sundays. a Saturdays only. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baeeaee from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Aeents for Time Card-* andother 
Information. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 




Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf. San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports. 11 A. M.: January 1. 6. 11, 16.21, 
26, 31. Feb. 5. chanee to company's steamers at Seattle. 

ForB. C. and Pueet Sound Ports, 11 A. M., Jan. 1.6. 11 
16,21,26,31. Feb. 5. and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p. M.. Jan. 3. 8, 13, 18. 
23. 28. Feb. 2. and every fifth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at SantaBarbara, Port 
Los Angeles. Redondo, (Los Angeles). "Queen." Wednesdays, 9. a. m., 
Santa Rosa. Sundays. a. m. 

For Santa Cruz. Monterey. San Simeon. Cnyucos. Port Harford, San 
Luis Obispo, Gariola. Santa Barbara. Ventura. Hucneme. San Pedro. East 
San Pedro, and Newport (Los Angeles), "Corona." Fridays. 9 a. m.; 
"Bonita." Tuesdays. 9 a. m. 
ForMexlcan ports. 10 a m„ 7tn of each month. 
Forfurther information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice. 
TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
G00DALL, PERKINS & CO.. Gen. Aets.. 10 Market St.. San Francisco. 



■ 



7:20 A. M. LOCAL FOR FRESNO. BAKERSFIELD 
and intermediate points. 9 a. m. California Limited, 
with Sleepers. Dining and Observation Cars to Kansas 
City and Chicago, 1:20 p. m. Local for Stockton. 8 P. M. 

II Overlnnd Express, with Palace and Tourist Sleepers and 

*' Chair Cars San Francisco to Chicago. 



BROOKS-FOLLIS 
ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

527 Mission Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
porter, »„d Jobber, of ElCCtnCal Slippfe 



I in 
Tel. Hain 86 



Brushes 



For barbers, bakers, bootblacks, bath-houses, billiard 
tables, brewers, book binders, candy-makers, canners, 
dyers, flour mills, foundries, laundries, paper-hang- 
ers, printers, painters, shoe factories, stable men, tar- 
roofers, tanners, tallers. etc. 



Buchanan Bros., 

Brush Manufacturers, 609 Sacramento street. San Francisco. Tel. 6610 

C. A. Murdock & Co., PRINTERS_^*> 

No. 532 GLAT 8TREET. S. F- 

California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibceon Ferby— Eoot ol Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30.9:00. 11:00 A. m: 12:35, 3:30, 6:10, 6:30 p. M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11 :30 p. m. Saturdays— Eilra trips at l:50and 11:30 P. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30. 11:00 A. M.: 1:30. 3:30, 6:00, 6:20 p. M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10.730,9:20.11:10 A. m.: 12:45, 3:40. 5:10 p. M. S.turdayj 
Extra trips at 1 :65 and 6 :35 p.m. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10.9:40. 11:10 a.m.: 1:40. 3:10. 6:05. 6:25 p.m. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 1 In Effect Nov. 7. 1900 1 Arrive In San Francisco 


Week days I Sundays | Destinations I Sundays I Week days 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 


8:00 AM 
9:30 AM 
5:00 pm 


Novato 
Petal uma 
Santa Rosa 


10:40 am 
6:05 PM 
7:35 pm 


8:40 AM 
1025 AM 
622 pm 


7:30 AM 
3:30 pm 


8:00 am 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 

Geyserville, Cloverdale 


7:35 pm 


1025 AM 
6:22 pm 


7=30 ^ | 840 AM | =<«*««■. ™* h 1 7:35 pm | 622 PM 


7:30 AM 1 8:00 AM ) Guerneville t 735 ?M 1 10:25 AM 
3:30 pm | ! Uuernevllle j 6;22 pM 


7:30 am 1 8:00 AM 1 Sonoma 1 9:15 am J 8:40 am 
5:10 pm | 5:00 pm I Glen Ellen I 6:05 pm | 6:22 pm 


7;30 am I 8:00 AM | q . hftflt ._., 1 10:40 AM 1 1025 am 
3:30 pm | 5:00 pm [ Sevastopol | 7.35 PM | 6:2 2 PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs; at Fulton for Altruria; at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springs, Highland Springs, Kelseyville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs: at TTklah, for Vichy Springs. Saratoga Springs, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Witter Springs. Upper Lake, Pomo, Potter 
Valley, John Day's, Riverside. Llerley's. BuckneM's, Sanhedrin Heights, 
Hullvilte. Booneville, Phllo, Christine Soda Springs, Navarro. Whltes- 
boro, Albion, Little River, Orr's Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, 
Westport. Usal Wlllits. Laytonvilte, Cummlngs, Bell's Springs, Harris. Ol- 
sen's. Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates, 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 



H. C. WHITING, Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass, Agent. 



Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m.. for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG. 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkon 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday, Feb. 9. 1901 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday. March 7, 1901 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Saturday, March 30, 1901 

Doric (via Honolulu) Thursday. April 25, 1901 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 

corner FirBt. D. D. STUBBS. General Manager. 

SS "Sonoma." Wednesday. Jan. 23. at 9 p ni, 
88 "Mariposa." Saturday, Feb- 2. 2 r>. m, 
88 "Australia," to Tahiti. Friday. Feb. 8, 4 p.m. 
line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa. 

.1. D. SPRKCKELS & BROS. CO.. 
Agents. 643 Market Street. Freight oftlce. 327 
Market St.. San Francisco. 




January 19. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



ASSESSMENT NOT CE 
BtlcMr Utter Hlelne. C*«MM- 

nefaaJaaaeaoJ „, r iw. o 

■LJtT^jj ' ■■" ' ■ • • <■ ■' Hi* ll-^r.l f : -« hrM 



*Wtt-»». <A 



men which thli • -hall remain unpaid 

rilK -il. DAT OP FKBKU M:\ 
will he delinquent, and advcrti*rd l-.r «a • „ mf . 

men! I* made before, will »h* • 

1. to pay the delinquent »mystmu «iih theeosla 

ol advertising mul exp» 

Ofllcc— RiNim 87, third floor Mill- Building, north! -h mixI 

Montgomery Sl«.. S*n Francisco. Cal. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Polos) Mining Compan*. 
mi. <>f i»rincl»mt pier* jco, Callfornlr. fxx-a- 

Uoaofl «.. r k* Storey Oooniy, Nevada. 

b Is hereby siren that at amoetlnjrof IheBoard ■>( Directors held 
on the Hth liny of January, 1901, an aaaoaamei 

ire wan levied upun the capital stock of Ihe corporation, p u able Inv 
■ r in Lnlted States Bold coin, to the Secretary, al the office of the 
'..mn.my. room 79. Nevada Block. aOB Montgomery street. Ban l-'mnclnco. 
CaiffOTtria. 
Any stock upon which this aaaeaamenl aha]] remain unpaid on the 
lOtfa DAY OP FEBRUARY, 1901, 
win he delinquent md advertised i«.r s aleal public auotlon, and unless, pay- 
ment la made before will be sold on THURSDAY, the Uth day of March, 
IWJi. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of advertising 
and expense!* of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

-« ^- . ~, CHA°.E.BLUOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room .O.Nevada Block. No. 309 Montgomery streets. San Fran- 
cisco. (*al. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Caribou Oil Mining Company 
Location of principal place of business— San Francisco. Cal. Locution of 
works- Coalinga, Fresno County, California- 

Notice la hereby given, that at a meeting of the Board of Director-, held 
on the tenth day of January, 1901. an assessment (No. 2) of ten < 10) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately In United States gold coin to the secretary at the office of the 
company, room 10 Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, Sim Francisco, 
California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 12th DAY OF FEBRUARY. 1901. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the flflh (5th) 
day of March. 190], to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

AUG- WATERMAN, Secretary 
Ofllc— Room 10. Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Yellow Jacket Gold and Stiver Mining Company. 

Location of works. Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada- Principal place of 
business. Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meetimrof the Board of Directors, held 
on the tenth day of January, 1901, an assessment (No. 6) of fifteen cents 
per t-hare was levied upon each and every share of the Capital Stock of 
said Company, payable immediately to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, or to James Newlands, Transfer Secretary, Room 35, Mills 
Building, third floor. San Francisco. California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on Friday 
THE 15th DAY OF FEBRUARY", 1901. 
will be delinquent, and ndvertised for sale at public auction; and unless 
payment Is made ( efore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 20th day of 
March. 19iil. at four o'clock p. m.. In front of the office of the Company, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together wth the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Trustees. 

W- H- BLAUVELT. Secretary 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, California ; location 
of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey county. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 28th day of December, 1900. an assessment (No. b5) of five cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States gold coin, to the secretary at the office of the com- 
pany, room 29, Nevada Block, 3<i9 Montgomery St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
C_, 1st DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1901 

will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and uulcsa pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 21st day of Fcbru- 
ary, 1901 to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of ad- 
vertising and expenses of Bale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

A. W. HAVENS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 3G 

Amount per share...... ,.5cents 

Levied December 28. 1900 

Delinquent in office January 31, 1901 

Dayofsaleof delinquent stock ■ February 21, 1901 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office: Room 57, Nevada Block, 3l9 Montgomery St.. S. B'. Cal 



ASSCSSMCNT NOTICE 
Crewe ••mi G«l« and M tiaj aiming C««M"i- 

• it «n-l 

M 
tin: ~ . I 

will t*c delinquent and MB par* 

raenl Is naada before, tefll be boM on THUBSD*Y. lha 10th -Uy ••! 

tlir del I nq ui • nl. together with th< 

of adTOTthrliia; end eiueuaaa of aali Board ol K 

ZZ _ JAMBS NBWLANDS. t 

t.i floors, MlHi itiiiiiiine. notthaaal ootnet "I Bnab and 
atotaieroeaeTT s t re e t, - California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould A Curry Sllter Mining Company. 

Aaaeeffmcnt No. 93 

Amount per share In cent* 

Levied Di camber i. lwo 

Delinquent in office u lanuary 7. 190] 

I>ay ol dale of delinquent slock January 2*. 1901 

ALFRBD K. DUBBBOW, Secretary, 
Office— Room 69. Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery -.trcet. San Fran- 
' ah 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 
For the m\ months ending December 31. 1900. dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the Savings Department ol this. < pony a* followa: 

On Tcfm Deposits, at the rate ol three atx- tenths (86-10) per cent per 
annum, andonOrd nary Deposits »t the rate ol three (3) percent per annum, 
free of taxes, and pnyable on and after Wednesday, January. 8, 1901, Divi- 
denda nnealled for are added to the principal and hear the same rate of 
dividend as the pili dpal from and nftcr January 1, 1901. 

J. DALZELL BROWN. Manager. 
< alifornla and Montgomery Sts., San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1900. a dividend bos been declared 
at the rate of three C3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Wednesday. January 2, 1901. 

GEORGE A. STORY. Cashier. 
33 Post street. San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE- 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held this 
d;i.\-. n dividend has bee" declared at the rate of three and one-eight (3%) 
per cent per annum o<> all deposits for the six months ending December 31, 
1900, free from all taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1901. 
December 28, 1900. ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary, 

Office— Corner Mark et. McAllister and Junes Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society. 
For the half year ending with December 31. 1900, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of three and one quarter (3 %) per cent per annum on 
all deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Wednesday, January 2. 1901 

GEO, TOURNY, Secretary. 
Ollicc — 520 Ca lifornia street. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 31st of December, 1900, a dividend has 

been declared at the rate per annum of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per 

cent, on term deposits and three (3) per cent on ordinary deposits, free of 

taxes, payable on and after Wednesday. January 2, 1901. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 
Office— 532 California St., corner Webb St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society, 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending December 
31, 1900, at the rate of three and one-fourth (3%) per cent per annum on all 
deposits free of taxen, and payable on and after January 2, 1901. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same rate of dividend as the prin- 
cipal from and after January 1, 1901. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— 101 Montgomery S t., cor. Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal, 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association. 
For the year ending December 31, 1900. declared a dividend of 5 per cent 
per annum on ordinary deposit sand 6 per cent on term deposits. 

WILLIAM CORBIN, Secretary, 
Office— 222 Sansome St., San Franciseo, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Security Savings Bank. 
For the six months ending December 31, 1900, a dividend has been de- 
clared upon Term Deposits at the rate of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) per 
cent per annum upon Ordinary Deposits at the rate af three (3) per cent, per 
annum, free of taxes, payable on and after January 2, 1901. 

S. L. ABBOT Jr., Secretary. 
Office: 222 Montgomery street. Mills Buiiding.San Francisco- Cal. 

GEORGE GOODMAN 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

Artificial Stone 

(Schillinger's Patient) in all its branches- Sidewalk and garden walk a 
inecialtv. 

Office— 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, San Francisco- 



specialty- 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 19, 1901. 



The Gre»Lt Mormon Discovery. 

Evidently the Mormons feel that the power of their curi- 
ous faith is on the wane, and that something must be done to 
stimulate its failing adherents. Consequently they have dis- 
covered a ruined city in Southern Mexico, which they claim 
to have been built by the last survivors of the Nephites. 
And more marvelously still, they have discovered stone 
tablets which completely support the Mormon traditions. 
Singularly enough, the inscriptions are similar to those on 
the brass tablets so happily found by Joseph Smith in New 
York. History certainly has a knack of repeating itself, but 
still one cannot help thinking that it is a little too late in the 
century for such supernatural revelations. It will be re- 
membered that, many years ago, when Joseph Smith was 
only a poor ignorant farmer in New York State, an angel 
appeared to him and confided the great secret of the brass 
plates. With this material at hand the ingenious Joseph was 
able to compile the Book of Mormon, which is one of the 
most extraordinary romances ever invented by man. It is 
most interesting reading, even for the skeptic; it has a !iue 
old Robinson Crusoe flavor of adventure aoout it. Six liun- 
dre.i years before Christ. Levi and Ismael built an ocean-go- 
ing craft, with which they sailed from Jerusalem, and, in 
some unexplained fashion found their way around the stormy 
Horn. After many miraculous escapes they are supposed to 
have landed somewhere on the coast of Chili. Of course 
Providence was always with them, ready to lend a helping 
hand when needed, so that it is not surprising the race 
waxed prodigiously and spread over the whole continent, 
even penetrating as far north as the present United States. 
The book is full of tales of war and faction, written in a 
style closely imitating that of the Old Testament. We are 
told how Levi's two sons. Nephi and Laman, founded rival 
nations, which fought incessantly for several centuries, un- 
til, about a thousand years after Levi's miraculous voyage, 
the Lamanites completely wiped out the Nephites. After 
this achievement it is not astonishing to hear that the North 
American Indians, one of the most blood thirsty of savage 
races, were directly descended from the Lamanites. And 
new we are left wondering whether there is a Mormon Elder 
with sufficient literary talent to work up the material on 
the newly found stone tablets in a second Book of Moi- 
mon. Another Joseph Smith is needed, but it is doubtful 
whether he will be found. 



— There are not wanting ominous whispers that the con- 
certed attacks upon Lord Kitchener, already in full swing 
in the organs of the pro-Boer party, may drive support from 
quarters in which any attempt to discredit and hamper a 
British commander in the field ought to be wholly impossi- 
ble. It would be. remarks the World, a military scandal 
beside which any other of recent months would dwindle into 
insignificance if the bitter jealousy which the rapid promo- 
tion of the hero of Khartoum has notoriously aroused were 
to find expression in the form of encouragement to the 
anti-Kitchener campaign which has now been started by 
Boer sympathizers in this country, and which may be trusted 
tc increase in virulence as soon as its object has taken 
over the command-in-chief in South Africa. 



House cleaning has no terrors for the thrifty house- 
wife who sends her carpets away and lias them cleaned ac- 
cording to scientific principles. Spaulding's Carpet Cleaning 
Works, 353 Tehama street, will handle any floor covering 
good or bad and return it in the same condition as before — 
minus the dirt. You need not be afraid to give Spaulding 
your most delicate carpets. Patronize him now and beat 
the spring. 



Outside of San Francisco you can't get a commercial 

lunch to equal that given here, and outside of Fay & Foster's 
at the Grand Hotel Cafe, you can't get a commercial lunch 
at its best. Save a trip home and try them, between 11 
and 2 o'clock. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper irformation, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country Tel. Main 1042. 



—John W. Carmany still makes shirts, stylish and well-fitting. 
He is at room 32, second floor Chronicle Building. 




Deafness Overcome: 

Science has triumphed at last. 

Latest and greatest invention up 
to times. " Invisible Ear-phone." 
Conveys sound directly to nerve of 
hearing. Appliance inserted in eai. 
Vibrating coil acts like telephone 
Reasonabe Head noises, ear dis- 
charges cured quickly. Wiite for treatise and testi- 
monials free. 

INVISIBLE EAR PHONE CO , 

i2jo Aich St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hotel Bartholdi, 

THE very center of the city, convenient to 
alKthe ble stores and all places of amusement 
European plan, 81 a da." and upwards. 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Sauare Park) 
Finest cafe in this city. 



Milton Roblee. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Wm. B. Hooper, Manager 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

San Francisco 



R1GQS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C. 

The Hotel " Par Excellence' 



of the National Capifal. First-class in all appointments. O. G. 
Staples, President; G. Devitt, Treasurer. 

American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

Paraiso Hot Springs 

Tlie Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 



Monterey County, Cal. 



C. T. Romie, Proprietor 



J. B. I'ON. I Pierre Carrree, Founder of Malson Tortonl. I C. Lalanne 

Old Poodle Doq Restaurant 

445 Bush street, cor. Grant Avenue, San Francisco 
Lunch. BO cts. Dinner, 75 cts. Also, a la carte. 

I. Deutcii, Proprietor. Telephone, Main 5544 

Crystal Palace 

5 Kearny St., 12 Geary St., S. F. Cal. 

Choice "Wines and Liquors. 



Cafe Royal, 




Corner Fourth and Market streets, San Francisco, 
Try our special brew steam and lacer beer, 5 cents 
Overcoats and vnlises checked free. 



ST. LAWRENCE Livery and 
Sales Stable 

423 Post street, between Powell and Mason, 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1123 

W. E. Bridge, proprietor. 




15 
a> 

> 



Price, per copy, 10 ctnU. 




ESTABLISHED JULY JO, 18S«. 



Annusl Subscription, H.oo 



California JUbxriisjcr. 



Vol. LXM. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 26, 1901. 




Number 4. 



W «fi l m?BijRM. , i* d '' vr^, " *"•"■"*«» hy the proprietor. HUH 

'" ','."" I ■ • Kc, "»- «™d, s«n PnuMtaoo. Entered «t .»».. I ,»n- 

CWCO Pofttofllce aA •c-\.ii(l-rtii« mutter. 

Thee-n HSWS 1 BTTSRIn London, Km . i« USOrornhlll 

llrc« . when 

lnf.irmi.lwin ivmy ho obtained rCBnr.line milwcrlpllonii nn.i advcnl-mir 
rales. Pari- Kriimc-onicc. No 17 \v, lit,.- de I .'Opera- 
All toeU Itame. innoonooinente, edyerllalna ..r ,,tii<-r u„itier. Inl ir.i tot 

publication in the current iiiimhcr oi ilio NEWS LETTEK, -I,. .uld be 
•rut l., this ofllce not Inter than 6 p. tn. Thursday. 



By the numerous suicides out at the Presidio, we would 
suspect that even a soldier is not always happy. 

The latest breed of Anarchists come from Greece, where 
capital punishment has evidently been too little enforced 
among the criminal element. 



It is not true that a coroner's jury never finds an H"i 
guilty of murder. Witness the case of Glaze, who will 
eventually go on trial for his life. 



'Tis said that speculators have been feeding wormy flour 
to the lunatics of the Mendocino asylum. Well, who but 
crazy men would accept their animated groceries? 



Failing to qualify as chief executive, Bryan will become an 
editor, which proves the truth of what his most loving ene- 
mies have said of him: Bryan doesn't want to get rich. 



State institutions for criminals are not so much on detect- 
ing crime, it would seem, else the directors of San Quentin 
would not have waited till this late date to discover that 
Waldon began his pilfering some years ago. 



Senator Nelson, who wants the State Legislature to reduce 
prize-fights to four rounds, is certainly on the right track, 
but if he obeyed the mandate of the public decency he would 
substitute for 4 in the clause mentioning the number of 
rounds, and do away with the nuisance at one fell swoop. 



Baron Robert de Rothschild may be a gentleman, but it 
is certain he is not well up on his code of honor, or he would 
not have committed the queer blunder of seriously wounding 
Count de Lubersac in a recent duel. The young baron has 
not yet learned the end and purpose of the great French duel 
as exploited by one Mark Twain. 



That parson of Holyoke must have preached powerfully 
and well, since a jury has been found to assess the damages 
caused by his sermon at $1000. It would be impossible to 
get a verdict like this in San Francisco, where no jury 
would appraise the most eloquent clerical address at more 
than a cent. 



The conversion of Louisiana catfish into Californian sal- 
mon is only another instance of the wonderful resources 
of modern commercial chemistry. The only satisfaction is 
that we shall not have to eat any of the stuff in this State. 
It is to be hoped that by way of retaliation we will start a 
cannery for converting skunk into terrapin or some other 
Southern specialty. 



A joint Congressional committee, whatever that may mean, 
will probably take the Philippines in hand -and start an in- 
vestigation as to the causes of our long-continued unpleas- 
antness with the people of those islands. Whether a joint 
Congressional committee can bring the war to a speedier 
close than a joint military committee, it is for the future to 
demonstrate; but our prayers are for the best. 



Why should the Nevada legislator. Bghl the lottery In 

their State! I'ri/.i -m.-hts and kangaroo marriages bat 

ii In their deadly work, so why should not Nevada 
lx'gin to make money out of her own maverick enterpi 



A cynical correspondent suggests thai the Commltti 

■ Itisena who arc making preparations to n idenl 

McKlnley when he visits San Francisco should be comi 

ol doctors and cooks, in aqua] parts. Thru 
banquettcd chief executive might be allowed ;i Fighting 
i hance with his digestion. 



Chili reminds us of the little boy who, not being allowed to 
go with his papa to the prize-fight, stays n! home and pum- 
mels his younger brother. Chili was not big enough to 
send an army to China, so making the best of the situation, 
?.he proposes that several of her South American sistei 
jump on tiny Bolivia and partition her among themselves. 
Bold, bad Chili! Just like Uncle Sam. 



Local Chinese seem to get their share of the news-space 
of the dailies by hook or crook. If they are not toying with 
the gambling ordinances, they are breaking the immigra- 
tion laws, or conducting bargain sales of slave-girls, or high- 
binder executions, with a sprightly audacity that gives em- 
ployment to the local police and news to the Chinatown re- 
porter. 



The cadets at West Point have, of their own free will, it 
is said, taken steps to abolisn hazing in the future in the 
Nation's Academy. This act reflects credit on the cadets 
as officers and gentlemen in the making and leaves us 
reasonable hope that some of the hard truths uttered con- 
cerning cadet brutality in the past may not be applicable 
in the future. 



Why a New York jury rendered a verdict of murder in the 
second degree in the case of the murderers of Jennie Boss- 
chieter, appears as clear as mud to the News Letter. Had 
the deed for which the lives of the three New York assas- 
sins need not pay, been committed south of the line by 
black men, the press would have had another page of fiery 
horrors with which to disgust the sane. For the law to do 
away with atrocities, it might be well for juries to hang occa- 
sionally. 



Mrs. Carrie Nation, of Kansas, having gone on another 
cold tea debauch, went forth the other night in Wicheta, 
Kansas, and with a second roistering companion made sad 
wreckage of one saloon and then another. Demented by the 
W. C. T. U.'s strong vintage, heaven only knows how far the 
lady would have gone, had not a coarse, brutal bartender 
shoved a horse-pistol under her nose and threatened to 
scatter her brains unless she desisted. It was all a very 
lamentable affair. Not so much because Carrie wrecked 
the saloons, which probably deserved it, as because the bar- 
tender did not shoot. 



Duke Henry of Mecklenburg has run away from Queen 
Wilhelmina of Holland because, he says, the Dutch Parlia- 
ment does not offer him enough inducements to become the 
royal husband. The Dutch Parliament, as businessmen, 
ought in all conscience to see by this time that it is up to 
someone to marry the coquettish queen and be quick about 
it, before the title "maiden monarch" become irrevocably 
stamped upon her. If Mecklinburg is a statesman, he will 
remain coy for a few years when the Dutch Parliament will 
doubtless be quoting queens at a very reasonable figure. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 



THE DEATH OF QUEEN VICTORIA. 

Unhappily the affection of a world will not prevent the 
coming of death, or otherwise Queen Victoria had lived on 
forever. She represented so much to the world that the 
world will hardly seem the same without her. It is true 
that reigns will begin and end, statesmen will come and go, 
and the affairs of nations will go on much as before, yet the 
example of England's noble Queen will live after her. She 
has given her name to the century in which she lived, and 
the Victorian era will be renowned in history for all time, 
as the greatest and grandest her country has ever seen, 
and the most prolific of good to the nations at large. A 
great many things have happened in her time. When she 
learned for the first time from her mother, the Duchess of 
Kent, that she was then and there Queen of England, she 
exclaimed with tears in her eyes: "What? Queen am I? 
Then I must be good." From that first spontaneous outburst 
of feeling she never during her long reign departed. Of trials, 
personal anlictions, and of even national disasters, she has 
witnessed not a few. Through them all she has lived up 
to her ideal of "being good." For sixty-three long years she 
reigned over the mightiest empire the world has ever seen, 
yet never once did she commit herself to aught that the best 
thought and conscience of her people would have had other- 
wise. It may be said that as a constitutional monarch she 
had nothing to do but act upon the advice of her responsible 
ministers. That is a half truth, and so far as it is true, it 
is the noblest ornament in Victoria's crown. She was the 
first to interpret, and to keep strictly within the constitu- 
tional limitations. But the monarch may advise as well as 
be advised. If her ministers refuse to take her advice, she 
may dismiss them, appeal to Parliament for a new set of 
ministers, and failing in that she may appeal to the coun- 
try for a new Parliament, but ultimately the will of the peo- 
ple prevails. Queen Victoria is known to have taken a keen 
personal interest in public affairs, and had a strong will of 
her own, yet woman though she was, she never brought on 
such a crisis as we have indicated. She was faithful to every 
ministry she ever had, and every ministry was faithful to 
her, a thing otherwise unknown in the intrigues and cabals 
of courts. Only once, so far as the public knows, did Vic- 
toria refuse point-blank to act on her ministers' advice. 
It was a momentous occasion. It involved no less a ques- 
tion than the maintenance of the union of the United States. 
One of our naval officers, after a display of force, and against 
a formal protest, took from an English mail steamer the per- 
sons of Mason and Slidell, who were going abroad as repre- 
sentatives of the Confederacy. Everybody now admits 
that it was an act of belligerency, and a breach of inter- 
national law, which justified resentment. To make matters 
worse, the people of New York went fairly wild in their re- 
ception to the naval officer, and Congress voted him its 
thanks. When the news reached England — there was no 
cable at that time — there was an almost unanimous cry for 
a declaration of war, which tne weak government of Lord 
John Russell found it hard to resist. The case of the United 
States was put in its worst light, and much anger was stirred 
up. Russell proposed a middle course. He was disposed 
to first hear from our Government and give it an opportunity 
to make reparation. He wrote a despatch to Secretary 
Seward, pointing to the illegality of the acts done, and the 
approval of them by Congress, and demanded an apology, 
an official salute of the British flag, compensation to Mason 
and Slidell, who were still in prison. There were other 
terms that have passed out of mind, but were too onerous 
for a proud and self-respecting people to accept. Lord Rus- 
sell made his way late in the afternoon to Windsor to ob- 
tain the approval of the Queen. But that he did not and 
could not get. She bade the aged minister remain at the 
castle all night, and she and Albert would determine what 
should be done before morning. Thurlow Weed happened 
to be in London at the time, and but a day or two before had 
had an audience with the Queen, who had been informed of 
his reputation of being the Warwick or "King Maker" of Am- 
erica. She read to him, as her own, a copy of the despatch 
it was proposed to send, and asked for his opinion. Would 
it tend to war? Mr. Weed said his country was "in no condi- 
tion to engage in war with England at present, but it never 
would submit to the terms of that despatch." Queen Vic- 
toria thought so too, and for the moment the American poli- 
tician was first minister of the British empire. Victoria and 
Albert sat up all night preparing the necessary despatches 
in terms that it was thought would be accepted on this side. 



Mr. Weed was known to be "very close" to Secretary Sew- 
ard, and had no doubt informed him of what had taken 
place, as indeed he says he did, in an interesting account of 
the affair which he published some years later. Suffice it to 
say, an apology was made. Mason and Slidell were released, 
and the incident ended. The story deserves to be recalled 
at this time. It cannot but afford Americans pleasure, and 
i* gives us a view of the Queen as a masterful power in 
statescraft. A good woman, a good mother, and a good 
Queen has gone to her reward. 



KING EDWARD VII. 



His Majesty the new King of England has been installed 
into his great office with that peace and decorum which En- 
glishmen so much like to have observed on such occasions. 
His certain and easy way of putting on the crown affords 
a useful object lesson to all Europe. No party, and no set 
ot men in England to-day desires to change the succession, 
and it never will be changed so long as the monarchy holds 
to the constitutional practices that it has followed with so 
much wisdom and tact for the past sixty years. King Edward 
will make a good and popular King. He is every inch a gen- 
tleman in the highest and best sense of the term. His 
natural instincts will not permit him to go far wrong. He 
has long filled a role hardly less difficult than that of his 
Queen mother. His tact, good sense, and cheerful bonhom- 
mie have endeared him to the diplomats and courtiers of 
all nations. The commanding influence he has gained in 
British society alone marks him out as a man fitted to reign. 
He who can allay and appease the bickerings of high-born 
dames fulfills a harder task than he who rules over men. 
He has an even temperament, an ever-flowing fund of humor, 
and is never so happy as when making others happy. He 
is not so conservative in the use of his money as was his 
mother, who had a great family to found, whose future 
needs nobody can tell. Being "as liberal as a prince" will 
make Edward VII the idol of the London shop-keeper, and 
the hero of the upper tendom. If he will follow close enough 
in the footsteps of his mother to carry the nonconformist 
conscience with him, he will have conquered all England. 
In this connection it is but fair to say that his early indis- 
cretions were as white as wool, compared with the scarlet 
our sensational papers desired to paint them. It was a com- 
mon saying among American correspondents in London a 
few years ago that "when topics are scarce, write a scan- 
dal about the Prince of Wales. He will never deny it, and 
it is what our people like." It is needless to say that a man 
who had public functions to perform nearly day and night, 
was too closely surrounded with retainers, courtiers, and 
the public to go far wrong. He dearly loves sport, and so 
does the English public. He is ready at all times to make 
a cheerful and common-sense speech. A good specimen of 
that he has just made under the most trying circumstances. 
In his accession speech he said, speaking of his mother: "It 
will be my constant endeavor to always walk in her foot- 
steps. * * * I am fully determined to be a constitutional 
monarch in the fullest sense of the term, and so long as 
there is breath in my body, to work for the good and amel- 
ioration of my people." They were words well chosen. They 
were all the British people desired, and that they will be ful- 
filled is not in doubt. We predict that, while Edward VII 
may not have a long reign, he will have a successful and 
happy one. 



THE FUTURE OF THE GREAT POWERS. 

In the struggle for supremacy which the future foreshad- 
ows for the great powers, what is to be their alignment, 
which is to forge ahead, which fall behind, and which fall 
into decay? In this line of thought the century just ended 
has had a notable writer, in the person of M. De Blowits, 
of the London Times. In an article published in the Janu- 
ary number of the North American Review, he says: "In- 
different as to the past, with no special enthusiasm for 
the present, which has nothing new to offer me, and after 
long years, during which, in thousands of columns, I have 
loyally recounted, and often accurately judged, the every- 
day incidents of my time, and, above all, the so extraordi- 
nary events which I have witnessed, I should like now, 
without wishing to become a prophet, to indicate the prob- 
lems with which the coming century will have to deal, 
the questions which it will have to examine and to solve." 
M. De Blowits knows the courts of Europe well, has visited 



January 26, 1901. 



SAN FRXNCISCO NEWS LETTER 



moat of them. an<1 even taken part In their Intrlmies He was 

no hack writer compelled to in," no many rolumnn a 

He wrote only when bi 

He ha<l a wonderful faculty of flndlnit ool 

on "In the Inside," and a no 

rightly Interpreting what he hod found nut Mora thai 

persons in high ; ! to fool him, bat 

napping. When ' III was in • 

raaaing position of having man k n In 

atray the Independence o( Belgium the wily old chai 
told to De Blowlts the news and asked for its pnblli 
in the Tiroes, but hesitated to show him the original of Uw 
treaty. De Blowlts at once telegraphed for Inatrui 
and advised that the production of the original should be 
Insisted upon, and as a consequence, Bismarck had to Bend 
a king's messenger all the way to London with the origi- 
nal for the inspection of Mr. Walters. Then and not until 
then did the Times publish and vouch for it. England was 
believed at the moment to desire to bring the Franco-German 
war to an end. The proved bad faith of Napoleon promptly 
changed her intention. So much for the man De Blowits. 
Now for his prognostications, which we can only deal with 
very briefly. 

Himself a Frenchman he frankly concedes that France 
to-day knows nothing of the ideals with which she Degas 
the century- tt has a Republic but in name, and that is 
corrupt. Social types of the parasite, the idle and shiftless 
and the Dead Sea fruit, are costing France her stamina. 
Her achievements will fall far short of those of the last 
century, and if she does not cease to be the peace disturber 
of Europe, evil days may betide her. In the center of Europe 
he says that war will break out on the morrow of the death 
of Francis Joseph. With no heir to the throne, a peaceful 
succession, for reasons he gives, is impossible. As to 
Russia, he says that State escapes all laws of logic. The em- 
pire is the product of a single brain and a single will, and 
it remains to-day, as at its origin, subject to individual ac- 
tion. Violence alone can alter this situation, and what will 
happen then staggers thought. Great Britain has got about 
all the points of advantage she wants. If she continues to 
colonize with her marvelously sturdy and fertile people, 
it is hard to see how she can be distanced in the race. 
At the same time her deserved success has made her hosts of 
enemies, and she must take care to be never caught unready. 
He thinks Germany has yet a great deal to do to transform 
her union into a real unity, but thinks that Emperor William's 
masterful personality will yet make him the paramount 
power on the continent of Europe. Of the United States he 
has very little to say. But what he does say is to the point, 
he thinks our ancient policy was eminently safe and wise, 
and fitted to our condition. He thinks our dreams of ex- 
pansion will lead us into wars and entanglements from which 
we may not extricate ourselves. 



WHY NEW OPERAS ARE FEW. 

Puccini's "La Boheme," an opera that we are candidly 
partial to here in San Francisco — for was it not to ourselves 
that the little Del Conte band of Italians first presented 
it? — has not been a great success in New York, even with 
Melba as the Mimi. The music critics have been anything 
but kind to it, Mr. Khriebel of the Tribune saying that 
it is "foul in subject, and fulminant but futile in its 
music"; Mr. Henderson of the Times applauding the book, 
and in a fashion applauding the music, but only to say that 
its "twistings of rythm and harmonic disjointings" had been 
anticipated by Mascagni and Leoncavallo. AH of which goes 
to show that definite, final, unanimous criticism of a few 
work of music is quite impossible. From Wagner back there 
is hardly a great composer in the list who was not chal- 
lenged by the critics. Operatic music, depending as it does 
on the leader and his band, and the singers and their throats, 
is a hard thing to gauge. At best it is a question for the 
emotions rather than the mind. Mr. Khriebel's sincerity 
is not to be questioned when he says that "La Boheme" is 
not only the vehicle for noise, but the sonorous disturbance 
itself, but his opinion will bear arguing. If ever there was 
an opera whose music illustrated a colloquial text, certainly 
this is the one. Mr. Khriebel has evidently forgotten Leon- 
cavallo's failure with the same subject. Mr. Henderson is 
against that remarkable street scene in Paris. "The at- 
tempt," he says, "to set the scattered and fleeting exclama- 



iftes oaonoi itful." 

And muff a 

-- that Puci inl h.n attained to. The truth 

i lot of tu 

ilarlr, who pay thrown Ow 

Hit very little genuii, meat 

World, has demanded It; but when n little man like 
Dl of Italy, or Stanford of Qreal Britain, tries to do 
lilng In the same direct logical way. we sit on him. 
In France It Is even worse than In England and America. 
\ new opera will hardly get a hearing in Paris, while mad 
thousands will flock to hear a new voice In Marguerite. 
Kmirinian. the critic of the Saturday Review, recently 
The French composers continue to produce works 
which arc lair imitations of the old, and to show their origi- 
nality forcibly thrust In n few bizarre effects." There is 
no new music in France thai matters, nor In England, and 
there never will be in this country until originality and Inno- 
vation be regarded as virtues rather than sins. 



THE TROUBLE AT SAN QUENTIN. 
San Quentin Penitentiary is in trouble again, and for more 
years than we care to recall, it has been accustomed to 
get into that same condition. Now it is its chief clerk who 
has run away, leaving books behind him that no expert can 
unravel. He could out-expert all the experts, and that is how 
he came by his first acquaintance with the inside of San 
Quentin. He had received a long sentence for embezzle- 
ment, but proved himself so useful in keeping the accounts 
of the prison, that he was soon pardoned, and given the 
position of chief clerk at a high salary. Ere long his duties 
became so manifold and his various accounts so intricate 
that there was nobody in the institution capable of calling 
him to account. Warden after warden thought him imacu- 
late, challenged anyone to bring charges against him, and 
boldly asserted that his long experience was absolutely 
essential to the successful running of the institution. War- 
den Aguire even now maintains that the absence of his clerk 
is to be accounted for through his having been caught in a 
snow storm in the mountains, whilst out hunting. Unfor- 
tunately for that theory, some crooked dealings of his are 
coming to light. He had the sale and delivery of the untold 
number of jute sacks made in the penitentiary, and two 
cases have been unearthed in which he sold large invoices 
of sacks and failed to turn the proceeds into the treasury. 
Of course this indicates a shockingly loose condition of af- 
fairs. There could have been no check upon this clerk of 
questionable antecedents. He could have receipted to no- 
body for those sacks, nor could he have accounted to any- 
body for their cash value. Of course, if the State's business 
is to be conducted in that loose fashion, any of its employees 
are liable to go wrong in such times as these. The temptation 
is altogether too great. The prison directors are primarily 
to blame. They appoint the warden, who has little or noth- 
ing to do save to look after the outgoings and the incom- 
ings of the institution. The State provides him with a mag- 
nificent residence, and any number of servants. One room 
is set aside for the use of each one of the directors, with 
their names emblazoned on the outside in gilt letters. 
Prisoners plot within the dungeons, while schemes are 
no doubt hatched in more comfortable quarters. It is 
said that in all the land no better cocktails are mixed than 
in those quarters. There are prisoners there who learned 
the business in better days. Even the Governor is not averse 
to spending an agreeable evening with his appointee and 
friend, Aguire. It is said that Walden, the missing clerk, 
was the best cocktail mixer in San Quentin. When these 
things are taking place in "the house on the hill," what is 
going on in the dungeons below? When the cats are away 
the mice are at play. The convict clerks are squaring 
crooked accounts of different kinds, but especially for sacks 
not accounted for, and for opium that has not passed through 
the office of the commissary. In short, San Quentin is not 
an institution of which the State is called upon to feel 
proud. All idea of modern prison reform is as absent from 
it as divine grace is believed to be from Hades. California, 
with its public school system, its great universities, and its 
many large-hearted and philanthropic citizens, should feel 
humbled by the reflection that their State absolutely re- 
fuses to know anything about modern penology. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 



VENEZUELA SEEKING TROUBLE. 

Our experience with Venezuela largely tends to show that 
there is neither profit nor gratitude to this country in doing 
good turns to certain of the South American Republics. 
They quarrel and fight with each other and their revolutions 
come around in rotations as regular as the seasons. They 
give offense to us, although they know we are their pro- 
tectors, and they give offense to European powers, knowing 
that we should stand by the Monroe Doctrine, and save them 
from the punishment of their own sins. But this condition 
of things cannot endure forever. We cannot afford to be get- 
ting into trouble on account of people we have no sort of in- 
terest in, nor can we be eternally holding ourselves respon- 
sible to fight battles in which justice is on the other side. 
We came too near doing that under Cleveland, and in favor 
of Venezuela, some five years ago, to run the same risk in 
the clashing dangers of the coming years. Venezuela is now 
palpably spoiling for a fight with us. In the series of ag- 
gressions leading up to the threat of armed interference 
in what seems to be the well-established rights of an Ameri- 
can alphalt company; in the ill-advised resentment of this 
Government's friendly concern in that matter, and in the 
extraordinary seizure of British coasting vessels in which 
Americans are interested, under the flimsy pretext that 
they are needed to suppress a mysterious "revolution," the 
new President is inviting disaster from the very source from 
which benefits have flowed. We cannot in all decency ask 
England to submit to the seizure of her vessels, especially 
as they are engaged in the lawful service of Americans. 
What is the game of Capriano Castro, and with what ulter- 
ior motive is he looking for trouble? There has been talk 
of revolution in his territory, but no battles have been re- 
ported and the alleged theatre of unrest has been the inter- 
ior, whither ocean vessels could not penetrate. Yet he 
recently purchased George Gould's steam yacht Atlanta, 
and turned her into a war vessel, and bought from Germany 
20,000 Mauser rifles and 3,000,000 cartridges. He must have 
some new and unexpected use for these. It is believed that 
he is preparing for a declaration of war against our friend 
and ally, Colombia. Our Government and that of Great Brit- 
ain were near to taking up arms in 1895 over the Guiana 
boundary, and the latter submitted to an expensive arbi- 
tration to disprove pretensions on the part of Venezuela that 
as the tribunal showed, had the flimsiest of foundations. 
There is no reason why the Latin Republic should continue 
to make itself a nuisance to its friends, or invite reprisals 
on its revenues by the American and British war vessels 
now in its waters. 



WHAT THE WATER FRONT NEEDS. 

The removal of Fisherman's Wharf to the northern end 
of Meiggs' wharf emphasizes the necessity for extending the 
electric car system to the end of the seawall. Already the 
Sansome street line touches the water front, and its continu- 
ation for the remainder of the distance would be a compara- 
tively simple matter of construction. Of course, if a fran- 
chise is asked for over this route there will be the usual 
howl from scheming politicians, who invariably oppose any 
addition to the facilities for city travel. Still, we trust the 
Market-street Company will take the matter in hand, and 
secure the right to give us a comprehensive scheme of com- 
munication along our water front. As it is, San Francisco, 
for a great sea-port, is sadly lacking in facilities for getting 
from dock to dock. Stevedores, storekeepers, all who do 
business among the ships, realize this to their cost, for they 
are compelled to go to the expense of maintaining private 
vehicles in order to attend to their work. What we want is 
a belt line of cars, starting, say, from the foot of Third 
street, and running right along the seawall, passing every 
dock, to the northern end of Meiggs' wharf. This line would 
be tapped by the whole Market-street system, and in fact by 
cars running to every part of the city. One glance at the 
map will show the immense convenience of such a route; 
in fact, it is one of the things needed to make our car sys- 
tem one of the finest in the world. To illustrate the absur- 
dity of the present arrangements, we may take a common 
case. Suppose a man has business at the Pacific Mail Dock, 
and also with a ship lying at the seawall. To get from the 
former to the latter he must first take a branch car running 



up Brannan. Then he transfers to Kearny, later to Bush, 
and then by a round-about route, down Sansome to his des- 
tination. To get to the ferry is an equally tedious proceed- 
ing, the only difference being that the car goes on all the 
way to Broadway, down that thoroughfare, and then back 
again to the ferry depot. One could quote dozens of equally 
inconvenient cases, but everyone who has anything to do 
with the water front knows all about them. It is perfectly 
certain that if the Market-street Company brought forward 
a comprehensive scheme for bringing together all parts of 
the water front it would receive the united support of the 
whole shipping community. 



INTOXICATED PEOPLE ON CARS. 

Whoever has occasion to use the street cars late at night 
knows how inconvenient it is to travel in company with in- 
toxicated men. Just about the hour when the theatres are 
about to close, and their respectable audiences conveyed to 
their homes, the inebriates of the resorts and corner 
groceries are about to make their way home as best they 
can. It is a rough and tumble way. They board the first 
car that heaves in sight, and the chances are that they will 
have trod on your corns, and sat upon your wife's lap, before 
they have fairly brought themselves to an anchor. This 
nuisance is simply becoming intolerable. The police are 
not paying it due attention. A paternal government in 
Sweden has shown a kindly consideration for the weaknesses 
of its subjects, who use the suburban railroad trains at 
Stockholm by requiring each train to be provided with a 
separate' car for intoxicated persons. The immediate cause 
for this benevolent order of the State railway administra- 
tion was the freezing of Sunday inebriates who were put off 
in the snow, while returning in a riotous mood from Christ- 
mas festivities. To drop a man from a car in Stockholm 
about Christmas time, is a pretty hard and cruel thing to do. 
There may be states of civilization in which a gentle policy 
is the best. It is not well when drunken men are common, 
to eject them into the rain or snow at the roadside, and 
leave them there to perish, and it might be barbarous to 
exclude them at the start in the desolation or a suburban 
region. If drunken and offensive men are to be tolerated 
upon lines of travel, there should be some place in which 
they may be secluded to prevent them being a nuisance. If 
the police are specially charged with their duty in the prem- 
ises, we may be said to have passed the stage when it is 
necessary to provide separate street ears for the intoxi- 
cated, even in the suburbs. They can be better accommo- 
dated at the nearest police station. We think the day may 
come when we shall have first and second class street cars. 
It is not everybody, even in a high state of society, who can 
afford to keep horses and carriages. Street car travel, es- 
pecially late at night, is a mixed up affair that will have to 
be improved in the interests of the traveling public. 



ADMIRAL CERVERA. 



Two weeks ago the news flashed across the ocean from 
Madrid that the illness of Admiral Cervera was evidently 
hopeless. It is not too much to say that it was received in 
this country with genuine and widespread regret. The gal- 
lant old Admiral was called upon to face as trying conditions 
as a sailor could well encounter, and through it all he bore 
himself with a bravery and a modesty that won all our 
hearts, enemies of his, though we were. His chivalric treat- 
ment of Lieutenant Hobson when the latter became his 
prisoner; his sublime obedience to orders which drove him 
into the jaws of death in the heroic but hopeless dash from 
the harbor of Santiago, when he said, "I know I go to my 
doom, but I obey," his modest, dignified and tactful demeanor 
in defeat, have forever identified his name with all that was 
manly and honorable on the Spanish side of the recent war. 
He proved himself a worthy survival of ancient valor of 
Spain, and nowhere will his passing away, whenever it oc- 
curs, be more sincerely mourned than in the land before 
whose invincible standards he bowed in final defeat at the 
end of a gallant career. It may be that he will yet rally 
enough to spend many happy days of life. He is a well 
preserved and vigorous old salt, of the kind that rarely 
succumbs at the first alarm. It is two weeks since his 
case was said to be hopeless, but his death is not reported 
yet. 






January 2*. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



From Ealing Soft Eggs 

To H'esvring Movjrrvirv,;. 

BT REGINALD SOMUYLER. 
I lime I jniwered I f.w of m> i OmspondonU Hi 
knows I do not swk them, but they corns ,„ ,, 
i Bppeali that will not b«> denii 
the l„ik.. m Oakland— when b 3 ,„ 9 K „ 

when they .lie— Is anxious to know the Correct mi 
ing with a soft boiled egg. Should it be paten from ,i large 
or a small one. and in any clrcumstai permla- 

sible to mix broken toast or bread with it? 

My dear madam, there is but one clean, decent waj of 
eating the egg when It is soft. Do what Columbus did to It- 
knock off the end— and with a small spoon convey its meat 
to the mouth. Americans have long been noted as the dir- 
tiest egg-caters on the fare of the world. Egg-clothed have 
been their mustaches, egg-spotted have been their Clothes; 
1 have seen golden stains of the yoke on the dimpled chin 
or a young woman who might have sat to Charles Dana 
Gibson. A soft-boiled egg is an elusive and dangerous arti- 
cle of food for polite society, and the way that I have de- 
scribed Is the only proper way to eat one. An egg In a small 
cup, even when broken at the end as I have suggested, is 
unsafe and unprctty. and in a big cup mixed with bread — 
bah: it is simply obscene. The egg should be deftly broken 
at the top, held in the left hand, and delicately spooned out 
with the right. Unless you have been born to this sort of 
thing a little practice will be found necessary before a per- 
fect performance can be given. But it is worth the while. 
Table manners are the severest external tests to which one's 
deportment may be put, and the soft-boiled egg is the most 
difficult detail. 

* * * 
Evidently a quiet gentleman, of the Cosmos Club — he 
writes quietly and scrupulously and they make specialty of 
quiet gentlemen at the Cosmos — wonders if he is privileged 
to take the young wife of a friend of his to the theatre and 
a little bite afterwards at the Grill. Now, wouldn't that 
drug you? 

Dear boy, it all depends on how well you know the hus- 
band and how much the young wife cares to accompany. 
Of course, if hubby is, say, a Navy man, and far, far 
away from home, it is hardly reasonable to think that 
his wife should be denied the pleasures of the play- 
house. But my advice to you, quiet Cosmos man that you 
are, is to buy three seats instead of two, and take along 
a wide-awake chaperon. I've known funny things to happen 
even when a fellow's best friend has taken the "missus" out 
to see the show. If you are really a member of the Cosmos 
as your stationery would imply, you have almost as much 
to lose as she has, and my advice is not to forget the wide- 
awake chaperon. 

* * * 

Not one but at least a dozen have written me the last 
few months as to the kind of mourning men should wear 
out of respect to a death in the immediate family. On this 
delicate question I can give only my personal opinion. Wear 
none at all. It strikes me as altogether wrong to advertise 
one's grief to the world at large, either in the old-fashioned 
black with the broad black band on the hat, or the badge of 
mourning on the sleeve, set off by a light tweed suit. Death 
is the one thing in life that will not bear joking with. If 
you have any black bands that count they are on your heart, 
and all the tailors or hatters in the country cannot make 
your sorrow more poignant. Don't think of fashion at a 
time like this, don't think of mode and form, do unostenta- 
tiously what impulse directs — and incidentally pardon me 
for my moment of seriousness. 



Famous beauties cannot afford to expose their com- 
plexions to cheap cosmetics, so Mrs. Kendall, Ellen Terry, 
Adelina Patti, and thousands of others professionally fair, 
endorse Camelline for t,he skin. 



Of course you must go to the Caf£ Zinkand after the 

show is over. That is where you can get the most elegant 
little suppers, see the best people and hear the best music. 
Globe trotters say that it keeps pace with cafes abroad. 



California Limited 



75 hours 



to No change of Cats anil 

the most perfect set vice. 
CV\\r**crr\ Leaves every morning at 9 
V^niCdgO o'clock. 



on 



Cn n fn Cr» Ticket office at 64 1 Market St . 

jtxwva re and at Ferry Vnot 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 



Bethesda 



to swim in. 



— Dr. Siirady, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liqu»r Dealers, 

Send for Pamphle 418 Sacramento Street, 



College San Rafael 



For Young Ladies 



Conducted by the Sifters of St. Domlnlo 
Full colleirlc course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
grade. Superb modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. MubIc and art rooms. 

Located In the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael. San Rafael, Cal. 



WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LID,) OF ABERDEEN. 



Scotch_Whisky 

Importers • MACONDRAY & CO. 

THE PACIFIC COAST REGULAR 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

Season Begins May 1, 1901. 

Four years' course. University graduates allowed one year advanced 
standing. All lectures between 6 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Address, College 
Building, 818 Howard St. 



H. J. Stewart 



Teacher of Vocal and 
Instrumental Music 1 

Studio : 1406 Van Ness Avenue 



Blake. Moffitt & Towne 



Blake, Moffit & Towne. Los Angeles. 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland Or. 



Telephone Main 199 



Dealers in PAPER 

66-57-69-61 First street, 8. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 




Tkasurelr 

Wand 



GJtohcy 



no »cuTd butJttahun 's .__ 

Tom Jfaort, 




Thank God, San Francisco is not talking about the moral- 
ity or immorality of "Becky Sharp." For once the daily press 
has observed a decent silence on a subject that it generally 
gloat over. In the New York papers there were hot discus- 
sions over the scene where Rawdon Crawley comes home 
from the bailiff's to find Becky 5,000 pounds richer and 
sipping champagne with the Marquis of Steyne. It is true 
that Becky has set this hour to pay the price of Steyne's 
many favors, she has schemed with the Marquis for Raw- 
don's arrest, but there is nothing of the slightest physical 
suggestiveness in the scene, and the lines are no more 
wicked than those that have preceded or those that follow. 
The prune-fed prudes who made salacious rebuke of this 
scene in the third act would have a hard time convincing 
me that they ever read "Vanity Fair," a novel without a 
hero, by one William Makepiece Thackeray. Langdon Mit- 
chell's adaptation, which takes its name from that of the 
fascinating adventuress, who is the all-central character in 
his one-eyed-view of the book, is not even as frank in em- 
phasizing the unvirtue of Mrs. Rawdon Crawley as is the 
original novel. Young women of tender years and hearts 
and heads are permitted by parents and schoolmarms to 
lead "Vanity Fair," and on my soul I don't see why they 
should not be permitted to see a bit of Becky on the stage, 
especially with Mrs. Fiske to be the Becky. It is distinctly 
to the credit of the town that we have steered clear of this 
nauseating and unnecessary "morality" howl and taken the 
play and the actress solely on their value as entertainers. 

Play? I wonder if that is the precise word? Part. I think. 
would suit better. Mr. Mitchell has written an excellent 
part of Hamlet-like proportions for Mrs. Fiske. It is all 
Becky. Every incident is selected with a view to giving 
Becky the central warmth of the calcium. Every other char- 
acter of the many taken from the book is systematically 
subordinated to the star part. Our good friend Dobbin, for 
instance, who plays quite as important a role in "Vanity 
Fair" as Becky herself, is merely a labeled item. Without a 
knowledge of the book you would forget that he was in the 
cast. This fine, simple, brave, loyal gentleman has been 
called a booby, even from the book, but in Mr. Mitchell's 
stage piece he is nothing short of what the casual American 
would term a lobster. 

But if a one-part play was ever justifiable "Becky Sharp" 
is it at the hands of Minnie Maddern Fiske. Here is a 
woman with an individual power that is tremendous. She 
is as strong as Mansfield, as eccentric, as mental. Her 
nervous grasp is simply prodigious, and her sense of humor 
unerring. You may not fancy her voice, which is sharp 
and pitched all over the scale, you may not like some of her 
jerky mannerisms, nor the rapidity of her speech; but you 
cannot very well fail to admire the absolute, consistent char- 
acter she has builded, a character that never falters for a 
moment. Mrs. Fiske is to-day the most individual player 
on the American stage. She occupies a little field of art 
all by herself. Her personality fairly smarts, so positive 
is it. The ordinary tricks of the stage would seem to be 
unknown to her — at least, she never employs them. Her 
methods are sensational in their very simplicity and di- 
rectness. Hers is art, not art-art. And she has that gift 
of humor which a partial deity has denied so many women 
on and off the stage. Her Becky fascinates by its wit. 
audacity and undownable spirit. All the good people and 
all the good snobs pale beside the sovereign snap of Becky 
The world was made for her fun, and, with the usual ups 
and downs that attend oven the worst of us, she has it. 
Morals forsooth! Who looks for morals in a Becky Sharp, 
who looks for anything but sprightly cynicism, dainty sin, 
whimsical heartlessness, and wit, wit, wit? See Mrs. Fiske 
in this piece, and you cannot separate the part from the 
player. They are one; the identity is complete. 

The company that surrounds Mrs. Fiske is, I should say, 
worthy of more opportunity than falls to it in "Becky Sharp." 



In her single scene Mary E. Barker does a bit of genuine 
portraiture as the spinster Crawley. It is real comedy act- 
ing without pause, and thoroughly in the Thackeray spirit. 
Frank Gillmore strikes a fair mean between "side" and 
whole-heartedness for Rawdon Crawley. He gives the part 
a good picture, and his acting, while not inspired, is in the 
best of taste. I cannot say as much for Charles Vane's 
Steyne. He over-voices and over-acts the lascivious 
nobleman, and by shouting the epigrams loses a lot of their 
force. Dobbin, bad as is the part, is wretchedly played by 
Norman Conners. It is to laugh, and dear old Dobbin even 
as a statue should move one to other emotions. But all told, 
the company is not to be sneezed at, the scenery is pat to every 
particular of the day it pictures, the production runs on 
smooth glass, and Mrs. Fiske is the talk of the town. She 
has added a new portrait to the gallery of famous char- 
acters. 

* * * 

Speaking of Mrs. Fiske's peculiar voice and intonation, I 
now see where Florence Roberts has been taking points. 
Dut Miss Roberts is a bad imitator. I prefer Etta Butler, 
who did the scene with Steyne at the Orpheum. 

* * * 

The Montmartrois (Mr. and two ladies) sing quite amiably 
at the Orpheum this week. One may not care for the Sol- 
diers' chorus from "Faust" as a vocal trio, two parts female, 
but they do it very well considering the handicap; and the 
big "Faust" trio they give with copious effect. Another 
musical turn is by four modest-looking young women who 
have organized under the melodia name of the Schumann 
Quartette. One plays the 'cello, another the piano, another 
the harp, and Miss No. 4 sings. They are unassuming and 
quite adequate to the easy demands of their repertory. 

In a short piece called "Parlor A," in which a drummer 
for a sporting goods house is mistaken for a bishop by his 
fiancee by mail (the bishop's niece) Mr. O'Rourke and Miss 
Braham lure considerable laughter from the crowd. The skit 
is vulgar some of the time and funny the rest. 

* • * 

When the Tivoli people give a good show (which is not sel- 
dom) one does not wonder so much why they have done so 
well as why not better. They have the people in the 
Kreling house; they have the ensemble and the variety 
which go to make up a gilt-edged opera troupe. But there 
is something lacking in the make-up, in the fitting together 
which compels us to ask, why was it not even better? Now, 
Dorothy Morton's presentation of "The Fencing Master," 
given here with more or iess rather bad acting six or 
more years ago, had, nevertheless, a certain frothiness which 
the Tivoli company, individually better, does not attain. The 
Whitney company had over the Tivoli company the advan- 
tage of that indescribable something granted by a partial 
heaven to the special production, but denied to the stock 
company. 

For all common purposes, however, "The Fencing Master," 
as given at the Tivoli, is a good show, a merry show, and a 
musical one. Unlike De Koven & Smith, as generally ac- 
cepted, this opera partakes largely of the burlesque and re- 
minds forcibly of "The Merchant of Venice" gone mad. 
Many of the choruses, such as "The Bum Musicians." and the 
"Serenade," are whimsically worthy of De Koven. 

Maud Williams is an exceedingly wooden Francesca in 
tights and out of them, and her love scenes with Tom Green 
are not over-ardent on either side. Ferris Hartman and 
Edward Webb as "Pasquino" and the "Duke of Milan," re- 
spectively, are, of course, star features. Bernice Holmes's 
big, pleasing voice and large stage presence are shown to 
advantage in the character of the Marchesa di Goldoni. 

* * • 

"Sweet Lavendar," penned by Arthur W. Pinero before he 
began to trouble himself with problems, when he was satis- 
fied with creating a comedy that had only human interest 
with a trifle of melodrama sprinkled in as in excuse for be- 
ing, is showing the Alcazar people in their best light this 
week. This is partly due to the fact that a Pinero comedy 
when given half a chance will act itself, partly to the 
fact that the Alcazar people showed signs of cordial rela- 
tions with their parts and of a happy appreciation of the pos- 
sibilities of the beautiful little drama. 

Especially commendable last Monday night was the work 
of Miss Crosby, whose quality of humor was not strained, 



January 26, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWI LETTER. 



and waa always graceful, and that of Cla Mine. 

wbo. as -Dick Phenyl." gave »o »jrnir .'I an 

Interpretation that even his mannerist, 
in the character. Lorena At wood as Ruth It 
nrolded melodrama, and I.lln Convere's I. 
well her sweet but none too rigorous personality. I 
was pert, and even Howard Scott was almost good- 
It. a record for Mr. Scott. 

• • • 

Charles H. Boyle as "Chaunccy Depot." in The BUT Hoar- 
it the Alhambra, does several of Walter Join 
stunts with more or less humor. The piece has a chorus 
that would do better If It did not attempt to sing. 
largely a hodge-podgedy of horseplay that seems to amuse 
with the aid of a re-hash from several good songs. 

• • • 

There is a real imported Russian Nihilist cllmajt to aierj 
gasp as the Central Theatre this week, where "Darkest Rus- 
sia" thrills and thrills ecstatically. There are knouts and 
prison cells and exiles and palaces and fair peasant girls 
enough to suit the most fastidious. Howard Hall, in a red 
huzzar uniform, cuts and hacks his way through fom 
to a happy love match. 

• • • 

The Louis James and Kathryn Kidder combination will 
open at the Columbia on Monday night in Wagenthal & 
Kemper's production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream." 
The management of the James-Kidder combination have 
aimed to couch in artistic and elaborate scenic effect the 
lines of Shakespeare's whimsical play. An elaborate stage 
arrangement is promised for the last act which is laid 
in a wood where sprites and mortals meet. The leading man 
and lady are supported by a strong company, composed of 
Norman Hackett, Thomas Coffin Crooke, James J. Ryan, 
Ashley Miller, Jane Coker, Ethel Browning, Ina Brooks, 
Jessie Merritt, and Aphie James. 

• • • 

The Orpheum management promises a big bill for next 
week, in which the headliners will be the Nelsons, acro- 
bats, and nine in number. Their act has a world-wide reputa- 
tion, and they should repeat here the sensation they made in 
Berlin, lizzie and Vinie Daly dance. Foy and Clark will 
present a sketch by Will M. Cressy, "In the Spring of Youth," 
and the Learner sisters will do a contortion act. Sam Lock- 
hart's baby elephants will enter upon their third and last 
week, the most popular animal act ever seen in San Fran- 
cisco. 

* * * 

"The Fencing Master" will be continued one week more 
or perhaps longer at the Tivoli. 

• * • 

Next week William Gillette's farce comedy "All the Com- 
forts of Home," will go on at the Alcazar, with Willard's 
"Judah" to follow. 

• * * 

"Becky Sharp," with Mrs. Fiske, will continue another 
week, with "Tess of the D'Urbervilles" to follow on the 
night of Monday, February 4th. No Sunday night perform- 
ances will be given, and there will be matinees only on Sat- 
urdays. 

* * * 

The Theatrical Mechanics' Association will hold their 9th 
annual benefit at the Columbia Theatre Sunday afternoon, 

February 10th. 

• * • 

James F. J. Archibald, who made a name as war corre- 
spondent in South Africa, and in Cuba, will lecture on per- 
sonal impressions of the Boer-British war, at Sherman, Clay 
& Co.'s Hall, next Thursday and Saturday nights. Mr. Ar- 
chibald is a fascinating talker, and has seen some of the 
most thrilling events in the history of the past few years. 
He will show stereopticon views from pictures taken by 
himself. 

Next Monday morning the advance sale of seats for the 
Henschel recitals will open at Sherman & Clay's, and there 
is every indication that the recitals which are to be given 
early in February will be the most successful ever given here 
by these famous artists. The Henschels will not be heard 
here again for some years. 



THE AWAKENING. 
l(Mf< fair 

Ura world 
I pictured him. From out my I 

■ i lov dlvlln' 
I pound upon my ro.- .I. . k. .1 god, 
And sin by sin I sai-rili< ■■•! 
Myself upon his altar. 

i.iy inipov.rlshi'd. abashed 
Baton my Idol's face I stood, 
And whispered low that all I had 
To give was given: My woman's heart 
Meat gently sweet. 1 raised my eyes. 
And lol upon that perfect brow 
Satiety sat wearily. 

MABEL PORTER PITTS. 
San Francisco. January 24, 1901. 



Columbia Theatre. """""• jj^, .n'dMuHm. 

Bcflrtnnine next Monday Waeenhnla and Kemper present MR 
Lol'IS JAMBS, MI.HS KAHIRYN KIDDER, and a superb oom- 
pany in a magnificent production of 

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM 

5ft— People— 50 

All the Mendelssohn music, with specially arranged numbers by 

Mayan De Ureaz- 

Gali-P^t-rii-a T U « -, 4- ,- «. THE POPULAR HOUSE. 
ailTOmia I Heat. re* Reservations by 'Phone. Main 1713 

Monday, January 28th, MRS- FISKE in the play In four acts, 

BECKY SHARP, 

(Pounded on Thaokery's "Vanity Fair.") 

Last "Becky Sharp" Matinee Saturday- 

Monday evening, February 4, MRS- FISKE in "Tess of the 

D'Urbervilles-" 



Orph 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 
©U IM . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 

THE NINE NELSONS, 

Lizzie and Vinie Daly, Foy and Clark. The Leamar Sisters, 
Monti&artrois Trio, Hacker and Lester, Warren and Blanehard, 
Swtgette and Clark. 

HAM LOCKHART'S B 4.B Y ELEPHANTS. 
Reserved Seats 25c.: balcony 10c.; opera chairs and box seats, 50o 
Matinees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday. 



Bklasco & THALL. Managers. 

Phone Main 254 



Alcazar Theatre. 

Week of January 28th, Gillette's charming comedy 

ALL THE COMFORTS OF HOME 

Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Seats reserved six days in advance. 
Reserved prices: 15c, 25o„ 35c. , &0c. 
In preparation— Willard's "Judah." 



Mrs. Ernestine; Krelinq, 

Proprietor and Manager. 



Tivoli Opera Mouse. 

Second week. Monday, Jan. 28th, the musical triumph 

THE FENCING MASTER 

By the authors of Robin Hood. An unequalled production of a 
great work- Splendid cast— Thirty pretty girls- Magnificent 
scenery and coBtumes. 

Every Evenings at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2Bharp. 
Popular prices— 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 
Coming— Nell Gwtnne- 



Metropolitan Temple. 



Next Monday at SHERMAN, CLAY & CO., the sale of seats 
begins for THE HENSCHEL 

GRAND UOGAL RECITALS 

To be given in February- 



After the Theatre 



Go where the orowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Oafe Zinkand Is society's gathering place after the theater 

over. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 




L ibraryGahh 



Literary Friends and Acquaintance It is a series of 

most interesting 
portraits projected against the background of his own 
delightful personality, that Mr. William Dean Howells 
offers to the reading public in "Literary Friends and Ac- 
quaintance." Published previously in Harper's Magazine, 
these pen pictures of illustrious writers became widely 
known. No person, however, interested in the literary celeb- 
rities of forty years ago, can afford to miss the present op- 
portunity of reading or re-reading in its continuity the per- 
sonal retrospect of American authorship by one who knew 
intimately Bayard Taylor, Lowell, Longfellow, Hawthorne, 
Thoreau, Emerson, Julia Warde Howe, Celia Thaxter, 
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Thomas Bailey Aldrich. and a host 
of other gifted folk, who, during the past four decades, have 
filled a large space in the hearts of the American people. 
In the opening chapter Mr. Howells speaks of his youthful 
literary ambition, of his literary entourage in Columbus, and 
of his first visit to New England. It was in 1860 when he 
was twenty-two years of age. A chance acquaintance with 
Bayard Taylor ripened into a cordial friendship, and of him 
at that period Mr. Howells says: "He had come to his full 
i epute as an agreeable and intelligent traveler, and he still 
wore the halo of his early adventures afoot in foreign 
lands when they were yet really foreign. He had not writ- 
ten his novels of American life, once so welcomed, now so 
forgotten; it was very long before he had achieved that in- 
comparable translation of Faust which must always re- 
main the finest and best, and which would keep his name 
alive with Goethe's, if he had done nothing else worthy ot 
remembrance." 

The vigorous, intellectual life of Boston appealed strongly 
to Mr. Howells, and created in him an intense longing to 
meet and to know the New England luminaries of that day. 
He describes a visit to Mr. Lowell, then in his forty-second 
year, and admits that he felt as a "subaltern might have 
felt before his general." With the fascination of Lowell's 
voice he was especially impressed, and speaks of its "vi- 
brant tenderness and the crisp clearness of the tone, the 
perfect modulation, the clear enunciation, the exquisite ac- 
cent, the elect diction," and adds: "I did not know enough 
then to know that these were the gifts, these were the 
graces, of one from whose tongue our rough English came, 
music such as I should never hear from any other." Lowell 
presented him to Dr. Holmes, then "in the most brilliant 
hour of that wonderful second youth which his fame flow- 
ered into long after the world thought he had completed 
the cycle of his literary life." 

With a letter of introduction from Lowell, Mr. Howells 
went to Concord to meet Hawthorne, who "was as cordial 
as so shy a man could show himself." "My memory of him," 
the author says, "is one of the finest pleasures of my life." 
His visit to Thoreau was a disappointment. With a card 
from Hawthorne he called upon Emerson. He speaks of 
the strange charm in Emerson's eyes, of the marble youth- 
fulness of his face, "chiseled to a delicate intelligence 
by the highest and noblest thinking any man has ever done." 
He recalls also the fact that twenty years before his death 
Emerson was the most misunderstood man in America, that 
he "once represented to the popular mind all that was most 
hopelessly impossible, and that in a certain sort he was a 
national joke, the type of the incomprehensible, the byword 
of the poor paragrapher." 

With Mr. Howells' first impressions of literary New York 
and its bohemian haunts is associated his acquaintance with 
Walt Whitman. He speaks of this "apostle of the rough 
and the uncouth" as the "gentlest person" imaginable, and 
pays him this tribute: "The spiritual purity which I felt 
in him no less than the dignity is something that I will no 
more try to reconcile with what denies it in his page; but 
such things we may well leave to the adjustment of finer 
balances than we have at hand." 



Of the author's literary affiliations with Ticknor and 
Field's, he descants pleasingly. He speaks of his youthful ad- 
miration for the famous men whom he met at that time, 
in so simple, so frank, and so unaffected a manner, and his 
hero-worship is so evidently genuine, that the reader must 
needs share his enthusiasm and should be correspondingly 
thankful. 

A year or so later Mr. Howells received from Lincoln the 
appointment of Consul for Venice and the Lombardo-Veni- 
tian Kingdom. It was there he met John Lothrop Motley 
the historian, then United States Minister at Vienna. Re- 
turning to the United States, Mr. Howells obtained a 
regular salaried position on a paper. In 1866 he be- 
came assistant editor of the Atlantic Monthly. To the 
literary situation in Boston at that time Mr. Howells gave 
much thought, and studied closely the causes that were 
rapidly bringing about marked changes in that situa- 
ation. Of Cambridge and his Cambridge neighbors and of 
life there so refined, so intelligent, so gracefully simple, he 
writes con amore. Take it all in all Mr. Howells's literary 
reminiscences are something for which to be grateful. Re- 
productions from many rare photographs add essentially 
to the interest of the volume, a portrait of Longfellow pre- 
facing the book. 

Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New York. Price $2.50. 

With Ring of Shield. Richard, Queen Elizabeth, Buck- 
ingham, Lord Rivers, the two 
young princes and many other personages belonging to 
that period of time covered by Shakespeare's play, "Richard 
the Third," are pressed into service by Mr. Knox Magee in 
his would-be historical story, "With Ring of Shield." The 
taking of Berwick, a tournament and a court ball, the death 
of King Edward, the intrigues of Gloucester, the abduction 
and rescue of a fair lady, the battle of Bosworth Field, and 
the undoing of Richard are the salient incidents of which 
the tale treats. There is plenty of love-making as well as 
plenty of fighting, and for finale a double wedding. This 
tale of court life and adventure is told in the first person by 
a Knight of that time, many years later when his sons and 
grandsons gather about him to hear from his lips some- 
thing of those martial days when great battles were fought 
with pointed lance and flashing sword. 

R. F. Fenno & Co., New York. Price $1.50. 

A Bicycle of Cathay.— What befell the teacher of the vil- 
lage school at Walford when, one beautiful summer morn- 
ing, he started out awheel to spend his vacation "over the 
hills and far away," Mr. Frank R. Stockton tells in most 
amusing and felicitous fashion in "A Bicycle of Cathay." In 
his own droll, inimitable way, the author makes the im- 
possible seem quite probable, and many a tourist in knicker- 
bockers will sigh for a glimpse of that mythical Cathay 
where, if they may believe this arch joker, there are young 
women a plenty, 

"pretty to walk with, 
And witty to talk with, 
And pleasant, too, to think on." 

Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New York. Price $1.50. 

The Sphinx and Other Poems. Mr. William Henry Hud- 
son, professor of English literature at Stanford University, 
whose critical work is so widely and so favorably known, 
has recently published a little volume of verse, "The Sphinx 
and other Poems." It is full of feeling and elevated thought, 
and must appeal to the cultured mind. "In the Plaza, Santa 
Barbara," has some beautiful lines, the quatrains are meri- 
torious, and the dedication is one that many a woman will 
read more than once. Elder & Shepard, Publishers, San 
Francisco, Price, 75 cents. 

M. E. B. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 



Robertson's 



126 Post Street 



January 2«. 1901. 



•AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



%Down trier v#i 






ft' 



Oh, Mrs. Fair. She boa a dag, 

Th. :s Ki.ln. 

And In its pain one d 

A most pei ullar dido. 

It shook its running little 

As though it did. in sooth, ache, 

And so the dentists did conclude 
That FMo had a tootha 

And so to shield his canine teeth 

They took a means of.-. 
And filled 'em up with Klondike gold — 

The job was most expensive. 

And now I'm told, a thievish band. 

By sly persuasions gentle, 
Intend to pick poor Fido's teeth 

And steal those treasures dental. 

It was Russo, the Tivoli's heroic Italian tenor, dear to the 
hearts of the ladies, who during the late popular opera season 
made his bow before a. San Francisco audience, and. like the 
gallant little man he is, begged leave to call the newspaper 
man who had said things about Senora Collamarini several 
kinds of very strenuous names, which the doughty tenor had 
duly noted on a slip of yellow paper. The effect was superb, 
and Russo expanded his chest several extra inches in the en- 
suing scene as the established and official protector of the 
fair. All was serene, and gasps of delight were not infre- 
quent among gentle admirers till a very late telegram came 
down from Victoria telling the disillusionated how the 
knightly Russo, in what was known as "a fit of jealousy" 
had land, d right dexterously on the jaw of his gentle pro- 
tege, Collamarini, and had subsequently been borne in 
spasms to the city lock-up. There were many who at the 
reception of this news looked on Russo as a fallen god. 
Not so the Crier, who never regarded the tenor's challenge 
from the Tivoli stage as other than an advertising dodge, 
theatrical in design and execution. 

The unexpected and surprising penetration of Inspector 
Inlow's valuable nose poking the glory holes of a transport 
steamer should be gratifying to his employer, Uncle Sam. 
Hitherto the activities of that useful and searching organ 
have mostly pointed out the peccadillos of stokers and such 
unimportant fold and perhaps no man was more surprised 
than himself when it revealed the sins of a couple of smug- 
gling captains in the Government transport service. But 
Inspector Bnlow's nose is no respecter of persons. This 
miraculous organ which can identify the perfume of tobacco 
iu the odorous confusion of an engine room should be a 
cause of national rejoicing for it has no parallel. Doubtless 
Collector Stratton will enter Enlow for the field trials and 
in the meantime he might be raised to the American peerage 
as the Lord Nose. As Omar Khayyam remarked : 

The hall no question makes of eyes and nose 
But here or there as strikes the player goes, 
And he that tossed you down into the field 
He knows about it all — he nose he nose. 

State Senator Simpson, as a rising son of temperance, 
stands now where once he swam, a full moon of inebriety. 
From the liquor curse, the Senator says, he is now freed, 
body and soul. Prayers did it. After a good stiff course 
01 exhortation Senator Simpson arose from his thralldom, 
a new man. The Crier, in a reverent mood, marvels greatly 
at the blinding light that has fallen upon Simpson. For 
behold the day when a Senator shall come unto Sacramento 
with a bracer that is greater than the Keeley cure! 



- popular aupcratition that a man of genius la In duly 
in n«» of till ,nay qualify 

Mil, photo-phono 

ally brougl 
■ man of K«nlus Is r. drill- 

I atlirr 

Ii Brown, the banker, "i Mr. Jones, ti 
making the large assumption ti. 

Hold is ■ man of genias, the Crier ton 

to declare thai Mr. Mansfield cannot throw mutton 
and Boft-bolled efts at offending waiters In a first- 
class hotel and still bo ranked as n gentleman. Mr. Mans- 

drunk with praise, lies rotting with that nolsesome 

mia peculiar to people Of his profession; and if he 
must persist in being as greai an ass as he is 
let him be admired while on the stage, but shunned while 
off of it. 

To hug or not to hug, that is the question which is agitat- 
concernlng thai more or less immoral dance, the 
tep. Fred b. Smith, secretary of the International com- 
mittee. V. M. c. A., says the average society dance Is a 
corker, a shocker and a brisk rival to the cuchee-cuchee. 
He also adds things I have heard somewhere before about 
"downfall of girls." "thousands of cases," and the rest of 
that old-time talk that ceased to convince when it ceased to 
It does not need a Fred B. Smith, however, (and 
Horn his position in society he is not eminently qualified to 
judge, I take it) to decide that the smashing embraces in- 
dulged in by the driveling swains of our schools and col- 
leges while dancing the so-called "half-time," partake of 
the nature of an indecency. To suggest a remedy, however, 
would be difficult, for there will always be nearly as many 
fools in society as in the Y. M. C. A. 

The sports kow-tow 
To Consul Ho Yow, 

That exceedingly polished Chinee, 
Who 's seen fit to mention 
His earnest intention 

A yellow Tom Williams to be. 

Kind public, don't laugh 

At his yellow-faced staff, 

When they're shown in the racing report, 

For his pig-tail crowned bookies, 

And almond-eyed jockies 

May teach us some things about sport. 

"As a lobbyist he is not a success," says a recent dispatch, 
referring to President Ide Wheeler before the legislators 
at Sacramento. Wheeler, it seems, is not gifted with that 
peculiar faculty for extending the yearning palm which con- 
vinces the lobby and wins the smiles of statesmen even 
where a judicious bribe might fail. President Wheeler 
lacks that quality. It is true he can make a very good 
speech where interested undergraduates, or even hoary 
dons, are concerned; he can converse right eloquently, too, 
on the new learning in Italy, or the new university in Ber- 
keley; but still the fact remains that Benjamin Ide Wheeler 
is no lobbyist. He may be very well in the class-room, but 
1 say unto you, my masters, a university president is a cold 
snap who cannot out-con an advance agent where the well- 
being of his institution depends on the digestion and good 
feeling of omnipotent Lord Politics. 

Officers of the U. S. transport Leelanaw are the latest 
government employees to offend in the way of smuggling 
small stuff into our port from the Orient. Most of the trouble 
in the Customs House lately seems, indeed, to be caused by 
transport officers who seem to think their uniforms license 
them to commit the misdemeanors which it is a part of their 
duty to discourage in others. 

The Rev. Oreste Vinzie, an Italian Methodist parson is 
stranded in this city, out of a job. When a lawyer or a 
doctor becomes needy, as a result of incapacity, he usually 
goes to work. There is a large opening for bootblacks in San 
Francisco. 

Occidental women's clubs need not feel so proud, since 
in China they had an organization of lady Boxers known as 
the Red Lantern Society, before Susan B. Anthony ever 
cracked a gavel. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 




liOokorOh 




There is nothing like that polite sacoir faire, possessed 
only by the cultured, which enables persons, coming together 
under the most awkward circumstances, to pass off every- 
thing with a courtly grace. Thus, when George N. Tyler 
of Alameda strangled Miss Gertrude Hinchman almost to 
death, thinking in the darkness that she was his wife, the 
following might have ensued: 

There was an Alameda man, 

(Confused by zeal or bottle), 
Who caught a lady passer-by 
And her did deftly throttle. 

"Excuse me, madam," said the man, 

"For threatening your life; 
I took this liberty because 

I thought you were my wife. 

"I hope you will forgive the act 

And think me not a granger; 
For well I wot it's dreadful form 

To choke a perfect stranger." 

"Don't mention it," the lady said, 
When she had ceased to strangle, 

"Pray do not think me so ill-bred 
As carp at this or wrangle. 

"That I should cause this awkward pause 

Quite fills me with contrition, 
For, Mr. Tyler, well I see 

Your delicate position." 

And as the courtly lady bowed, 

She murmured in conclusion, 
"Beg Mrs. T. to overlook 

My somewhat rude intrusion." 



It was my fortune during the recent unpleasantness at 
Stanford University to sit at meat with two young women 
students of that institution. One of them was consuming 
some sort of medicated food, being careful not to eat more 
than three spoonfuls at one meal as the directions prescribe. 
I don't know whether the practice is fashionable at Stan- 
ford, but I could not help wondering what might have been 
the effect of an overdose. Could it have been possible, for 
example, that Professor Howard when he broke loose was 
suffering from a spoonful of brains too much. The question 
opens up a new field of arithmetical psychology. At the 
same time the young lady remarked that she was reading 
five newspapers every day, a form of intellectual debauchery 
that seemed to suggest that the newspapers likewise should 
have directions for taking printed on the back of the box. 
It is hard to say what might have been the result had she 
got her medicines mixed and consumed five spoonfuls of 
brain food and only three newspapers per diem. At the 
same time she observed by way of comment on the queer 
discrepancy in tone between the editorial and the news ar- 
ticle on the Stanford trouble in the Examiner that the paper 
was "a sort of compound fracture." Perhaps after all that 
brain food was not so much amiss and the young lady can 
really think with her stomach. But why not let the box of 
brains do its own thinking and save trouble? That would 
be a distinct advance on the higher education by swal- 
lowing. 

* * * 

There is much factional feeling just now down Stanford 
way, so you cannot pin your faith to anything they tell 
you about professors and resignation-matches since the one. 
two, three order in which Ross, Howard, Hudson, ct a\, 
went out. But now that the Revolutionise and Royalist 
parties have given themselves a little cooling space, it is a 
refreshing thing to note that there are some who will even 



consent to jest judiciously. It may not be a matter of his- 
tory, that legend they tell about the professor and the 
Registrar, but it is amusing and it prods a little satire both 
ways. 

It seems that Registrar Orrin Leslie Elliott, a grim, un- 
I.opular pedagogue, was standing behind a desk in his office 
the day after the resignation of Professor Hudson, when a 
wild-eyed, disheveled professor rushed in. Registrar Elliott, 
holding in the one hand a bunch of registration cards, in the 
other a pad of faculty petitions, enquired of the tumbled 
teacher what his business might be. 

"Where do you keep 'em?" gasped the other breathless 
with haste and rage. "Give me one of those blank resigna- 
tion forms; I want to fill it out and resign." 
* * * 

Now that the crack new battleship, Wisconsin, has 
steamed bravely out of port with Captain Riter on her quar- 
ter-deck, there are certain jolly clubmen at the Pacific Union 
who laugh a significant snicker when the name of the gallant 
sailor is mentioned, just as though they had it on the Cap- 
tain. A clubman ventured to confide the cause of that smile 
the other night after theatre. 

"Not so very long before the Wisconsin left port," said 
he, "Captain Riter gave a little dinner at Delmonico's with 
four plates laid. Colonel Sonntag, U. S. A., and a bud and 
her chaperon were guests. The Captain gave it out that 
it wasn't to be much of an affair, as it had all been arranged 
in a great hurry. Well, you may imagine, the guests were 
somewhat surprised when they were bowed into the private 
dining room by a very imposing row of waiters and were 
confronted by a flower-laden board and about the swellest 
and complete service in the house. 

"Riter's party was all congratulations and compliments 
and the Captain had to stand a good deal of gentle raillery, 
over that 'impromptu' dinner he had been so modest about. 
So the feast went on course after course, and everything from 
oyster to roast evidently all thoughtfully ordered beforehand. 
About champagne time there was an evident hesitancy and 
confusion among the waiters and presently the steward came 
in and said with a conscious blush, 'I beg your pardon, sir, 
but I think there has been some mistake, sir. This room 
and this dinner has been ordered for someone else! 

"That was the reason why Captain Riter's 'emergency din- 
ner' had shown with such prismatic brilliance. Captain 
Riter being used to sudden onslaughts stood by the ship 
manfully, with the result that the party outside retired to 
an adjacent dining room and had an 'emergency dinner' 
which they had not foreseen. But the evening was over 
good feeling revived and the two parties exchanged cards 
and epigrams per waiters." 

"I'd give a cent to know who were in the other party," I 
remarked suggestively. 

"Well, I was one, if that will do you any good," replied 
my friend, the clubman, "and those flowers were on me." 

• » • 
Signs are funny things at best, but especially when they 
get mixed. I was riding out Geary street a few days ago 
and had occasion to observe the tearing down of old Calvary 
Church. It was well under way for the brick cart, but on 
a standing wall of the parsonage I read: 



and under that: 



Calvary Presbyterian Church. 
Rev. J. J. Hemphill, pastor. 



Danger! Keep out! 



Even the best-dressed club-man is sometimes taken for 
what he is not. For instance, Porter Garnett, who is not only 
a writer but an arch patron of good reading, was standing 
at the corner of Geary and Kearny streets just a week ago 
to-day with four News Letters under his arm, when a dig- 
nified young woman passing by reached out and took one 
copy and placed a dime in the Garnett hand that tried to 
get the paper back. When Mr. Garnett recovered conscious- 
ness the young woman was well up Kearny street toward the 

White House. 

* * * 

The hula girl in the ball-room stood 
And blushed to the color of coral, 

"And these are the folks," she murmured, "who call 
The muscle dance grossly immoral." 



January 2«. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



raU haw their paaga Jual aa marrtac** do. t 

•pent Moodiy morning In (!>■> .iffl f a 

mine whoao marrlajit' «Hh a charming woman h 
announced through the proaa at> 
me<llate futuro. Hardly » 

Hon '•■r.mnnli'9 than than ,,th a 

melting smile and a Caatorla fol 
Is this Mr. ?" 

"It Is." said my frl.'iul. 

• I thought so: and about to be maj , r d, if you 

please: I represent the Andsatorth Furniture Ootnpu 
wo would be happy to fit you out from 
or easy payments." 

"Thank you. but I shall lire In a hotel." 

"Oh. yes, maybe, for a little while, but It's only a qui 
of time before you will long for the delights of housek. 
Then send to us: just mention my name; you will find It at 
the corner of the card. 

Directly he had gone another came; he was brisk and to 
the point. "Hear you're setting married." he said, "and I 
thought you might need a stove. Housekeeping isn't such 
a warm snap without a good stove. We have them from " 

"But I'm not going to keep house," expostulated my friend. 
I'm going to a hotel and I don't want to buy anything." 

"That's all right." said the stove agent; "a hotel wont 
last two weeks with you after the honeymoon is over. 
Here's our card. Ring us up, and don't forget to mention 
my name." 

He was gone about five minutes when a crockery and glass- 
ware man entered. 

"But I'm going to live in a hotel," roared the now thorough- 
ly irate engagee. 

"Just for a little while, of course; then a nice little flat 
of your own. We'll take the duplicate wedding presents 
in exchange and sell you anything else you need in our line 
on the best of terms. The telephone number is on the card; 
just mention my name." 

The next caller was from a real estate firm; he had a 
lovely house all picked out. The next was a husky woman 
willing to cook for $30 a month and no children. 

Then I fled; and I don't think I'll get married this week. 
These enterprising tradesfolk follow an engagement an- 
nouncement quicker than an undertaker follows a death no- 
tice. 



Nothing better in the way of printing and make-up has 
been produced in the West than the first issue of Stanley- 
Taylor's new trade quarterly, "The Western Printer," which 
comes to us on heavy glazed paper, replete with half-tone 
and zinc work. Printing both as a trade and as an art is dis- 
cussed in essays by Henry Huntley Taylor, B. A., Wiley K. 
Galloway, Carl E. Ackerman, W. B. Killmyer, Charles T. 
Jacobi, A. E. Shattuck, George Norton ana Harrison Barto. 
There are several pages of good editorial and a humorous 
poem by Wallace Irwin, illustrated by Igoe. 



The "Advertiser," of Dundee, Scotland, has shown a truly 
Yankee enterprise in an issue they have just struck off. 
This issue is an exact reproduction of the first copy of that 
paper printed January 16, 1801, and is of interest to those 
who love the history of journalism. 



"In the spring the housewife's fancy brightly turns 

to thoughts of carpets." You will save yourself a great 
deal of worry, madame, — to say nothing of expense and 
dirt — if you send your carpets to Spaulding's Carpet Clean- 
ing Works, 353 Tehama street. Spaulding has the art of 
removing dust down to a nicety, and there is no fear of 
injuring the most delicate fabrics by his process, which is 
scientific. 



FINE FURNITURE AND CARPET SALE. 

This is a very good time for housekeepers to buy fine furniture, 
carpets, rngs, lace curtains, and draperies at low prices. The 
Pattosien Co is offering their entire stock at very low prices during 
the great challenge sale. This house has become in a few years one 
of the foremost houses on the Coast. The reason for it is that flne 
stock is selling at low prices when real Wilton Velvet Carpet sells 
at $1.05, Exmister, best quality, at $1.10; it means something. All 
other goods at same low prices. Cor. Mission and 16th streets. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 






Pears 9 

It is a wonderful soap 
that takes hold quick and 
9 no harm. 

No harm I It leaves the 
skin soft like a baby's; do 
alkali in it, nothing but 
soap. The harm is done by 
alk.tli. Still more harm is 
done by not washing. So, 
bad soap is better than 
none. 

What is bad soap? Im- 
perfectly made; the fat 
and alkali not well bal- 
anced or not combined. 

What is good soap ? 
Pears'. 

All sorts of stores sell it, •specially drup (jlVs; 
all sorts of people use it. 



Our Annual 
Reduction Sale 



20 per cent discount 
and over on 
Art Goods and Pictures, 
Crockery and Glassware 



Now On 



S. & Q. GUMP CO., 

113 Geary Street. 
WANTED 

A situation in a Commercial House. Thorough accountant and 
Spanish correspondent; would also accept employment as travelling 
salesman. Best of references can be given. Address 

C. H. C. t in care of this paper. 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, THR AWA3 SaoS, ao . 1 mi 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-1889. These pens are "the 
best In the world." Sole aarent for the United Stntes 
Mb. Hen by Hoe, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 

Weak Men and Women ^^TuSSST^SS 

It elves health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 
street San Francisco. Send for circular. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 




An item in last week's issue regard- 

The Golden Cross ing this well-known property in South- 
Mines, ern California, has brought out the fol- 
lowing particulars, which may interest 
some of our London readers: 

Financial Editor News Letter: — In your article on Golden 
Cross Mines, in issue of January 19th, your corrections of 
a part of the errors contained in the article printed in the 
London Financial News, to which you refer, are well done, 
and your comments on custom of English syndicates in load- 
ing properties, are justly proper and well-timed. I regret 
that you did not have full data before, that you could have 
corrected all errors by giving a brief history of the mines 
since they have been under present owners' management; of 
the development work done, and tons of available ore in 
sight; its gross and net value. 

When the present owners of the Golden Cross Mines 
took charge, the property was in litigation. The litigation has 
subsequently been settled, and a stipulated sum is now being 
paid to the creditors by the receiver; the indebtedness is 
practically all paid. There was a large indebtedness, and 
the mines have earned and paid, on indebtedness, in lawyers' 
fees, court expenses, etc., about $400,000, besides meeting 
and paying current expenses for development work and im- 
provements. In development work they have sunk the work- 
ing shaft from the 600 foot level to 1000 foot level; opened 
stations; run levels; and made cross-cuts on ore bodies. 
The drift on the 800 foot level is over 800 feet long, all in 
ore. Cross-cuts show width of ore from iO to 40 feet, without 
encountering walls. 

From the reports of several well-known mining engineers 
who have examined the property, I have condensed the fol- 
lowing: Tonnage of available ore in Queen, Cross, and 
Crown, 1,650,000 tons, of average assay value of $5 per ton, 
making a gross value of $8,250,000. Cost of mining and mill- 
ing, and cyaniding tailings, is $1.60 per ton; the net value 
per ton is $3.40; and total net value of available ore is 
$5,610,000. 

There are 600,000 tons of old tailings, which show an aver- 
age value of $2.40 per ton. The cost of cyaniding is less 
than 40 cents per ton; net value of tailings after allowing 
for loss, is over $1,000,000. The improvements have cost 
nearly a million of dollars. 

Net value of ore, $5,610,000; net value of tailings, $1,000,- 
000; reduce value improvements to $500,000; total net value, 
$7,110,000. The Beecher, Talmage, Danube, and General 
Miles are fairly well prospected, showing good ore bodies in 
all of them, of pay ore. 

I consider this property one of, if not the largest in Cali- 
fornia, and as soon as the mine is freed from the expensive 
management of a receiver, it will become one of the best 
dividend payers on the Coast, and will so continue for years 
to come. 

d. a. Mcdonald. 

San Francisco, Cal., January 22, 1901. 

The market for oil shares is still 
Business Growing in attracting the attention of the in- 
Oil Shares vesting public, and a large business 

was transacted during the week by 
the Producers' Oil Exchange. Within the next fortnight 
the San Francisco Board will make a bid for patronage, and 
dealers will have the choice between the two, with the 
result that they should be well served. The town is large 
enough for both Exchanges, so that the issues are not likely 
to conflict, as the arrangement will undoubtedly make the 
calling of stocks alternate, that the one may not interfere 
with the other. The manipulators of some leading shares 
are keeping these fluctuations lively, and while that is done, 
the opportunity for speculation will keep the market ac- 
tive. Some complaint is now made of the high rate of com- 
missions, which is at present just double the rate charged 
by the mining people on Pine street. However, as the busi- 
ness grows this will all be regulated, the brokers being 



then in a position to deal more liberally with their clients. 
The number of producing companies is rapidly increasing, 
and dividends are beginning to come along, to the intense 
satisfaction of shareholdeis. No very material changes 
took place during the past week, although in the majority 
of cases the range of fluctuations has been wide enough to 
permit of good profits for those fortunate enough to catch 
the turn. 

While the work of development of 
The Gold Mining quartz mines still progresses in the 
Industry. leading mining counties of California, 

it is not nearly as active as it should 
be. There is a dearth of money for carrying on the work, 
and from all accounts it is more difficult than ever to raise 
funds for this purpose in this city. Oil speculation has done 
much to dull public interest in gold mining, and it will con- 
tinue to do so while drilling wells holds the fad of the hour. 
Some interesting work, however, is going on in the northern 
counties, especially Siskiyou and Trinity, attended with 
much success. As a rule the capital is provided by Eastern 
mining men, to whom there is nothing new in the oil indus- 
try. Dredging is rapidly developing as a new and impor- 
tant branch of mining in California, and the year now en- 
tered is likely to witness the inception of some "extensive 
enterprises in this line. A number of prominent mining men 
have taken up this proposition, and it is said that South 
African magnates of London are about to invest heavily 
in the different portions of this State where the system can 
be advantageously employed, with John Hays Hammond as 
their representative in the field. 

Notwithstanding a continuance of good 
The Comstock reports from Con.-Cal.-Virginia the mar- 
Mining Market. ket on Pine street during the past week 
has been dull and uneventful. The very 
latest reports from this prominent mine warrant the be- 
lief that it will once again become a large bullion producer, 
and in face of this, it is astonishing how low the price of 
tin- shares keeps. This is due undoubtedly to the fact that 
the investing public feels that so far it lacks strong protec- 
tion against bear onslaughts, from which holders of this 
stock have suffered severely for some weeks past.. The most 
important ore discoveries count for little if shorts control 
the situation, as they certainly do now. The balance of the 
market has acted in sympathy with Con.-Cal.-Virginia, as 
it nearly always does, and prices have been pegged back 
day by day at a rate which has brought out much margin 
stock. Friends of the Comstock, who firmly believe in a 
good time coming, exist on this hope for the time being, 
while anxiously awaiting some indication of the presence of 
the master hand in the business, destined to restore order 
out of chaos. 

Business on the local Stock and Bond Ex- 
Sugar Stocks change has been rather quiet during the 
Rule Firm. week. The demand for bonds is fair, and 
transactions in this line have been re- 
ported daily. A feature of trading in a small way has been 
a movement in Gas and Electric, which advanced at one time 
to 50, on covering purchases by shorts, dropping back again 
to 46 % when these contracts were filled. The sugar list has 
been rather spotted with a firm undertone suggestive of 
quiet buying on the strength of a prospect for an up-grade 
movement later in the season. Brokers representing bull 
interests are inclined to the opinion that more activity will 
prevail in this investment market during the coming month. 
Money continues plentiful and cheap. 



Stops the Cough and Works off the Cold. 

Laxative Bromo-Qulnine Tablets cure a cold In one day. No Curo, 
No Pay. Price, 25 cents. 



It isn't pleasant to unfold a tie or a suit of clothes 

with the expectation of wearing it and find that it has been 
disfigured by an ugly spot or stain. Why don't you send 
your things to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Establish- 
ment. 127 Stockton street, and be a well dressed and happy 
man in the future. Spaulding also cleans gloves, tapestries, 
laces and curtains. 



If connoisseurs could get anything as good as G. H. 

Mumm's brand of champagne, perhaps they would keep 
other kinds on their sideboards. As it is Mumm's wines are 
in exclusive use in the best hotels, cafes and clubs. 





1 


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VICTORIA. 



San Francisco News Letter, January 26, 1901. 




EDWARD VII. 



San Francisco News Letter, January 26, 1901. 



Jtnuary 2«. Itot. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW* LETTER. 



11 



THE EXAMINER AND THE QUEEN'S DEATH. 
Thjt fierce bogie term. ' y. Mow (ournalloni Is 
Its popularity Id thr moaUu "f the no| and 

It* poignancy as a term "f tuanjr 

peopl. ing lo baliara il> 

merely a bad spelling for enterprise Th.- first 
a newspaper Is to furnish th.- n>'ws. During I wara 

It was the so- -ailed yellow press that gave the first author! 
tatlve news. It wasn't lack, it was brains. 
I by no end of money that sot the 

'vative newspapers, obese with wealth, 
The] depended too much on routine rather than B| 

e. They saved money and lost circulation. A fen 
ago W. R- Hearst was called a spendthrift and a fool I- 

Id big salaries to big men and demanded of his editors 
tnat they get the news first and best ai any cost. To-day 
he is a figure by himself in the national journalism. In 
New York, in Chicago, lo Sun Francisco, he has set th- 
Four minutes and seven seconds after the death of Q 

iris last Tuesday the news was flashed to the Examiner 
of this city. The Examiner's flag was at half-mast, bulls- 
tins were posted, and a special edition of the paper v 
the street before the other papers had even posted bnlle- 
tins. This wasn't luck. It was the result of enterprise and 
foresight. The news came over 9,000 miles of wire, and sev- 
enteen minutes after its arrival the extras were in the hands 
of the newsboys. Unlike the Journal of New York and the 
American of Chicago, which print any number of morning, 
noon, afternoon, and evening editions, as the occasion de- 
mands, the Examiner is strictly a morning paper — except 
when something big happens. Day and night Blnce the first 
announcement of the Queen's serious illness a force of 
pressmen, printers, telegraph operators and editors was 
in constant attendance. Biography, pictures, every impor- 
tant detail of the meaning of the change of monarchs to Eng- 
land and the rest of the world had been written, set op and 
stereotyped. A page was left for the final news, and whin 
that news came and had been corroborated, it was only 
a question of minutes before it was printed and in the 
streets. The Examiner has scored many "beats," but this in 
its very deliberateness and simplicity is perhaps the most re- 
markable of them all. 



Following: are the transactions on the Stock and Bond. Exchange from 
Jan l7lh to Jan. 23d, 1901. 

MISCELLANEOUS BONDS 



la Hana 5"J TA v/tj 

JXiyHonakaa 475 3lK 3lk 

A Hutchinson 461 26*1 26% 

R Kilauea 540 2I>S 2}'A 



Makawell 545 42Vf (PA 

45 28J4 28H 

42 % Paauhau a Jfl Co 775 32% 32% 

t^ss Powders. 

& A Giant 510 81 83g 

i/l Vieorit 455 2% 2>4 



Oakland Gas 5U 0" -vm " "- 

Pacific Gas Imp 110 444 414 g"?Xu's PI Co 

Pac.LiKhtCo 65 i2'A «W Paaunau S 

Gas&Eleo 2387 50 

SFQnsllB-ht • 137 i% 

Banks 

Cal Safe Deposit 165 105J4 103;.i Miscellaneoos. 

GermanS&L 4 1830 1830 Alaska Packers 115 12554 126)4 

London. Paris & A- 50 14 X 143!J Cal. Fruit Canners . 80 WX 106 

Street Railroads. Cal Wine Assu 45U 100 100 

Market Street 55 69 68?i Oceanic S S Co 135 101 100 

UNLISTED SECURITIES. 
Bid. Asked Bid. Asked 

Abbey Land & Imp. Co 1 00 Monarch 70 

EouitableGas Co (pool) 2 Oil Sunset (oneinal) \t> 

Sanitary Reduction W'ks 1 00 California Fortune .» 

People's Mutual Tel. Co 20 00 Santa Miiria OS 

Cal. Auto. Telephone 1 50 Oriental 40 ...... 

California Mutual 50 Rival ** 

Oil Stocks. 

Fresno Alpha (San Lion (Sunset)..™ ...... 26 

Benito $1.00 Senator (Kern River) 2.15 

Aztec Oil Com'y (Kern Kern River Oil and De- 
River 81.40 velopment Co to 

Bachelors (Sunset) 25 Meridian 08 

BiePanoehelPanoohe) 20 Welllneton ■«> 

Diamond (sunset) 25 

Mining Stocks. 

Argonaut (Jaokson) 2 75 Victor Gold Mines 

Dutch (Tuolumne) 20 ...... (Marj-sville ... ■ .. ....- »0 

N. Light (Cape Nome) 12M Liehtner (AneelsOamp) 2 00 ...... 

Santa Rosalia (Mexico; 35 Mazeppa (Tuolumne) 3U 

Brunswick(Grass Valley) 20 30 La Fortuna (Arizona) 7o ■■•■ 

Orders for buying or selling above stocks (listed and unliBted) promptly 
attended to by 3oacn r Toplitz , stock Broker. Tel. Bush 385. 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange. Rooms 9 and 10. 330 Pine street. 



Some of the Superior Featured <>f the 

Atlas Pipe Wrench 



LoaAngJs Ry. 5% 2.000 @UlJ4 9. P. of A. Ry G'a .. 20.000 @ 111 

MklSt.lslMteSV. 5,000 @ 122 H.V-W-W. G'a --■ 2.000 @ M% 

Nor Cal RvS's ■■ 3 000 @ 110% S V W W 4% 2 Mtg.. .. 25.000® 104>4 

Nor Pac Coast 5's... 15.00-1 @ WR% S V W \V 4*b 3 Mtg... 10.000® 102 

NorR of Cal 5's 6.000 ® 12O-120J4 U S Bonds (coup)3'a.. 1.500 @ 110>£ 

OkldTrnsit Co6%.-- 18.000 @ 115 

STOCKS. 
Watee. Shares. H'st L'st. Sugar Stocks. 

Contra Coata Water... 175 70>£ 70 H » na 510 7%, _?/* 

Spring Valley Water. 461 93 

Gas and Electric. . 

Mutual Electric 325 6% 6 h 1 '?"!*: 

Oakland Gas 50 50 




The lltnttat'on i« raproduoed from a photograph of an is lurh AUm Pipe 

W r. it h in operation tin n 1 loOO ppfl »--d demumlriites why il -!•.!■- nol 
ormfa the pipe The teeth grip the pipe nl an angle and the gripping potnt 
I* In .i-lvanee of the handle. Bhowtn that in screwing R pipe y»u are push- 
ing it abend, ai.d thnl ymuln tint dig Into the pipe MMl drng it as In other 

-, therefore you do not oruah it Pot the name reuon the 

A tin* t'ipe W rnrh 0*H not look on the pipe »i the tripping point, being In 

nth Alice of the handle, it is Impossible for ft to lock- 

On the W inch wrench, slot N'"- 1 lo* '* t" 1 inch pipe, slot NO' 2 for 1% and 
l ! ■ Inch 1 ipc. slot N'ti- 3 for 2 inch pipe. 

The movable jaw. as the MtiHtratfon alaoshowa. Is not a screw jaw. and 
therefore h«n no weak parts. The-e arc no nuts on the wrcneh to jam and 
there are no delicate ports to sret out of ord 1- or break- Every part of the 
wrench m made Htromrand will stand hard usage- It lias the good qUOlltlM 
of the eliain pipe wrench and -crew pip • wrench combined without having 
the f mils of cither. Made of a apec al wrench steel, drop-forged and every 
wrench tested. It fa easily and quickly adjusted and superior to alt other 
wrenches in strength, durability, simplicity and effectiveness- 

Our 21 inch wrench will take Vi inch larger pipe than other wrenches and 
ffilnoh wrench 1 inch larger pipe; the wrench is ju-«t as effective when 
fully exlMidei aa when, used on small sizes. A set of four wrenches will 
handle all sizes from ] s inch wire to i' . L im.li pipe- 

Wit > all the above advantages, and known superiority over all other pipe 
wrenches, still the price is no higher than others now on the market- 

ATLAS PIPE WRENCH CO., 
flanufacturers 

Office— Flood Building, San Francisco. 

New York Office— 121 Liberty St 
Works— New Haven, Conn. 



and 
Supplies 



ninino; riachinery 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

Bartlett Concentrating Table. 

James Ore Feeder. 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

PARKE & LACY CO., 21 and 23 Fremont st 

San FranciBco 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 
Estate of John Robblns Deceased. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, P. Boland, Administrator of 
the Estate of John Robblns deceased, to the creditors, of, and all persona 
having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them with the necesaary 
vouehera, within four (4) months after the first publication of this notice, to 
the said P. Boland, Administrator at his place of business No. 238 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, the same being his place for the transaction 
of the business of the said estate in the City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California. 

P. BOLAND. 
Administrator of the Estate of John Robblns, Deceased. 
M. C. HASSETT. Attorney for Administrator. 

308-10-12 Phelan Building, San Francisco. 
Dated at San Francisco, January 12th., 1901. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No 121 

Amount per share 15 cents 

Levied J nuaryl9, 1901 

Delinquent In office February 21, 1901 

Day of sale of delinquent stock.., March 14, 1901 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary- 
Office: Room 14, Nevada Blook, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal 

A. B. TREAD WELL Attorney-at-Law 

(Formerly Judge Police Court No. 4) 

HAS RESUMED PRACTICE at 533 Kearny St., cor. Sacramento St. 
All legal business attended to promptly. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 




^A.:S-'r*.W& 



nsurance 




Fire, Lightning and Tornado Insurance and at cost, is 
being advertised by the Board of Insurance appointed by the 
General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 
Ye Gods! The brethren of the cloth not content with fight- 
ing the devil are now assuming a battle of far greater mo- 
ment and much greater difficulty, viz: the furnishing of 
insurance at cost. It has always been thought by those 
ardent sinners, the insurance men, that Providence itself 
(especially in California) would protect the edifices erected 
for its service against tornado and lightning, and they also 
have come to the belief that a paid for policy against loss 
by fire in a solvent company was the best thing in the way 
of fire protection and they have also found to their cost that 
the brethren usually got those fire policies at their cost or 
at least they had to throw off their commission or buy 
tickets for the church fair. If the Methodist Episcopal 
Church can show how they can furnish insurance at cost for 
a period of say five years, they can't afford (as well as they 
are paia) to be any longer employed standing idle on the 
roadway of commerce as the sign board directing the way 
to Heaven. It seems from the prospectus that the insurance 
men will in self-protection have to go in for the ministry 
and preach at actual cost. Brother, let us reason, do you 
know the cost of fire, lightning, and tornado insurance? If 
not, how are you going to find out? If you do tell who 
told you and great shall be, your reward in Heaven 
but the road you are trodding now has been found 
by thousands of other at cost companies to be broad and 
easy and lead to destruction as represented by a receiver. 
Now verily say I unto you: all from Bishop to Circuit rider. 
It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle 
or a paper pig to pass unscorched through that place we wot 
of than for you to successfully furnish insurance at cost. 
* * • 

A circular headed Palatine Insurance Company, Limited, 
of London, and Palatine Insurance Company, Limited, of 
Manchester, and signed by C. F. Mullins, manager, says: 
"By this circular we desire to convey to you officially what 
has been in a sense within your knowledge for some time 
past, i. e., that it is the purpose of the Palatine of Man- 
chester to be retired from active business in the United 
States, and that in its place will be substituted the Pala- 
tine Insurance Company, Limited, of London, England." 

This latter company was organized August last to replace 
it. The London company has now complied with the laws 
of all the States, including your own. They have deposited 
$892,000 securities with insurance departments and United 
States trustees, and having no liabilities they start with 
the entire amount as surplus. As fast as the liabilities of 
the Manchester company terminate, its securities will be 
transferred to the London company, and these amounts, 
added to the fact that the sole ownership of the London Pala- 
tine is in the Commercial Union of London, makes the secur- 
ity offered its policy-holders of the highest character." Of 
this amount $430,500 is invested in United States 2 per cent 
(1930) bonds, and the balance in other first-class securities. 

* * * 

The Manhattan Fire Insurance Company has purchased the 
Erie Fire Insurance Company of Buffalo, and it is understood 
that the Erie will now be run with the Manhattan. C. B. 
Squire is General Manager for both companies. The Erie 
was organized in 1874. Has gross assets of $614,879.33, paid 
up capital of $200,000, and a surplus beyond all liabilities 
of over $154,000. Fallon & Co. represent the Manhattan on 
the Coast as managers and their record for the past year war- 
rants the prediction that the same firm will soon have the 

Erie. 

* » * 

It is getting awfully tiresome to say "nothing new" regard- 
ing the Scottish Union and National, but even this is some- 
what compensated for, for have we not even yet with us 
Agency Superintendent John Kelly from the Hartford office? 



At the annual election of the Fireman's Fund Insurance 
Company held January 22, the following were elected direc- 
tors: Wm. J. Dutton, Thos. S. Chard, J. C. Coleman, John 
Bermingham, F. W. Lougee, John T. Wright, Chas. R. 
Bishop, Bernard Faymonville, John H. Gardiner, W. H. 
Brown, Arthur A. Smith. The officers, it is needless to say, 
remain the same. The luncheon given was a Fireman's 
Fund affair: that is a success, both solid and fluid and 
smoke. The nicest thing by far, however, and the most 
appreciated by the company's friends, was the fact that its 
statement showed an increase in assets of nearly $129,294.68, 
and in net surplus of nearly $30,000. A new oil painting 
of lamented president Staples was uncovered for the first 
time and the office of President Dutton now shows the por- 
traits of his two predecessors. 

• * • 

With the opening of this century the old Home Mutual 
appears as the Home Fire and Marine Insurance Company 
of California. This change was made necessary to avoid 
such misunderstanding and loss of business as sometimes 
arose from the word "Mutual" in a stock company's title. 
The Home Fire and Marine commences the year with assets 
of $1,037,715.39, and now joins the ranks of the Millionaire 
Companies. In addition to the legal reserve, $412,571.45, it 
has surplus funds of $625,143.95, an amount certainly suf- 
ficient to meet all requirements. Its net premium receipts 
during the year were more than half a million dollars, of 
which there was returned $290,704.00 to policy-holders in 
payment for losses. 

* * * 

What is the matter with Ross Valley, the Mecca of insur- 
ance men, the place to which they turn with longing eyes 
when thinking of buying a place and building a home? Is 
it because insurance men congregate there that it seems 
fated to burn at least one of its fine homes once a year. The 
last was the Bach dwelling — $17,000 loss. 

• » * 

A local agency in Petaluma, the name of which ends in 
something suggestive of a sneeze, and representing some 
decent fire companies, is out with a revolutionary circular 
offering to cut rates and any and everything else. It is 
astonishing how the national characteristics of a nation 
will crop out in an individual. 

* * • 

The Fire Underwriters' Association of the Pacific will hold 
their annual celebration on the evening of the 6th pros., 
in the Maple Room of the Palace, and their annual meeting 
on the two days previous. 

• • * 

T. L. Miller, manager of the Industrial department of the 
Pacific Mutual Life, reports that his department wrote 
twenty-six per cent of the Whole life business written in the 
State, or over ten millions and a half. 

• * * 

The American Central has bought seventy-five per cent of 
the stock of the Mercantile Fire and Marine Insurance of 
Boston. 

* • • 

C. E. Mabie again crops up. He has resigned the presi- 
dency of the National Life Insurance Company of the 
United States of America. This name was too much evi- 
dently, even for Mabie. 

• * * 

James White, Jr., recently of Milwaukee, has come to 
the Coast to take charge of the Guaranteed Attorneys De- 
partment of the United States Fidelity and Casualty Com- 
pany, under Robertson & Nippert, Pacific Coast managers. 

* * * 

The Prudential Life Insurance Company of Newark, New 
Jersey, has applied to Insurance Commissioner Clunie for 
a license to transact business in California. McFarland & 
tell are to be general agents. The company will not do 
industrial business on the Coast. 
• • • 

The Governor of Indiana seems to know something. 
Wonder if he is a fire insurance man. In his message to 
the Legislature he recommended the passage of more strin- 
gent laws to reduce the fire waste. 

* • * 

The Texas Life Insurance Company of Waco is a new one. 
Capital $100,000. How much and in what is it paid, Mr. 
President? 



Jinuary 28, 1901. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



16 



Ooonte M. Eddr I* m»n»j>-r of a now company c»llt>.i the 
Wmtern Reinsurance Bureau of Chicago. It will tx 
atcd In (he umc manner towards Insurance .om panic* aa 
a clearing house is to banks. It seems like a eno<1 Idea. 

A new card out on tl Iwftrd B. Haitian, 

established 1S7!>. Fire Insurance, temporary offli-e. 1.15 Cal 
Ifornla street." Mr. Haldan Is generally taken n» Ix-lng a 
little older than the date of his establishment would Indi- 
cate 

George F. Grant, general agent for the Northern, mil 
tc reach Chicago in time to be at the presentation of silver- 
ware which the office and Held force of the \\ 
department made to general manager H. E. Wilson, who is 
over from London. 

Harry L. Roff of the Home has gone down South to crow 
he annual statement. 

Leslie Bates, the special of Outte & Frank, has recovered 
from a sprained ankle. He claims he had been drinking 
coffee and fell over a door-mat. 

INSURANCE 



P*C*f$C COAST OtPARTMErii 




G. M. WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET. 
San Francisco. Cal 



INSURANCE COMPANY 

of- fbsepobt Phone. Main 5509. 



Fire. Lichtnlng. and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of Mew York. 

Capital, t3.000.000 Gross Assets. $12,808,396 

Surplus to Policy-holders. 17.631.926 
H. L. Roff, General Aeent; Geo. M. Mitchell A Co.. City Agents. 

210 Sansome St.. San Francisco, Cal- 
The Hoke has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of Gkn- 
EEiL AND Special Agestb resident in the Pacific Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of its agents and the Insur- 
ing public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pay- 
ment of Losses 

New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of New York 

405 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cat. 

Edmund F. Geeen, Manager. Jesse W. Lilienthal, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability. Accident, Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Phenix Insurance Company of Brooklyn, n.y. 

415 MONTGOMERY ST.. S. F. 

Capital 81,000.000 

Surplus 2.520.708 

Assets 5,816.560 



GEO. T. WELLINGTON, Slate Agent for 
Washington. 



California, Oregon, and 




The Pacific Mutual 



Life Insurance Co. 

of California 

Organized 1868.) Paid Policyholders, $11,000,000 

Kilqabif & Beaver, General Agents Life Department 
■ F, W. Vooqt. General Agent Accident Department. 

Pacific Mutual Building, S. F. 



FIRE. MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 



fN.WRANCK COMPANY (Limited) 



OF LONDON ENGLAND 



C. F- MULLINS. Manager. 41&-U8 California street. S. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Founded A. D. 1792 

Uompany of / lorth Amer 



nsurance Company 



ica 



OP PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Polioy Holders $5,022,016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent, 412 California street, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up, $3,446,100 Assets, $24,034,110.35 

Surplus to Polioy Holders. $9,612,455.96 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, eorner Saoramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

op New Zealand 
Capital, $5,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office in company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hookeb & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BDTLER 4 HEWITT. General Agents 



413 California street, S. F. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 3,869,451.75 

Surplus to Polioy Holders 2,068,839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN HI. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 
Capital $6,700,000 



BAXFOTJR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 



316 California street, S. F; 



The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT. GERMANY 
Capital, $2,250,000 Assets, $10,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 SanBome street, S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. 9CHLESINGEE, City Agent, 304 Montgomery street, San Francisc^ 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 



A T\irf War To Play 
The Devil With Honest Sport. 



By the Horseman. 

The past week has been highly significant so far as local 
turf affairs are concerned. If I had to believe all I have been 
told in the last seven days, methinks an early and swift 
train to the effete East would suit me better than purple 
and fine linen in San Francisco. Even a tourist car, that 
wondrous medley of odors and sounds, would seem a palace 
just so long as it were possible to put many miles between 
oneself and the things one hears of. 

But no! After all this is not the Cannibal Islands, and we 
are not living in one of those "castle in Spain" periods with 
which Anthony Hope tittivated the palate of the novel-read- 
ing public and inebriated his fellow writers. Swashbucklers, 
tricked out in lace and velvet, with Damascene blades girt 
on, do not swagger through the corridors of the Palace. 
In this nascent twentieth century surely might is not 
right, and all is not fair in love or war even if that war be 
a turf war. 

Well, perhaps you don't know what I am talking about, 
and seriously I am not quite certain that I do myself. Still 
one has to do a share of listening in common decency and 
politeness, and in racing circles it is notorious that one can 
hear anything one wants. And in San Francisco it must in- 
deed be a queer thing that you do not hear, so strange are 
the things that the communicative friend and the ordinary 
gossip will insist on retailing. 

To come down to earth — the San Francisco Jockey Club 
has a new problem on its hands since the Supervisors of 
San Mateo County passed the resolution that scarcely inter- 
feres with the current season at Tanforan, but leaves a 
large problem as to the future. No one, even superficially 
acquainted with the history of racing in the State of Cali- 
fornia, could expect otherwise than to hear that the embar- 
rassment of the Tanforan people is merely the result of the 
Machiavellian policy of the California Jockey Club. It is 
freely stated, in and out of print, and yet it is more than 
hard to assimilate such statements. Around New York we 
saw "Pete" Delacy "get square" after the manner of his 
kind for the injuries that the Dwyers, after the manner of 
their kind, had wrought to the pool-room interests of which 
the master of No. 33 Park Row was the leading representa- 
tive. Great was the mischief wrought. Monmouth Park 
lies in abandoned ruins, and New Jersey is closed, while 
New York only escaped a similar fate by a hairbreadth, 
by an appeal to the subterranean powers of the Albany legis- 
lature. 

To the unbiased onlooker it seems almost impossible that 
any man who cherishes a spark of sentiment for a sport, 
that despite all the evil environments that have fallen to 
its share, still deserves the proud old title of the "sport of 
kings," should go deliberately to work to undermine the 
turf by "Delacyesque" methods. Delacy undoubtedly did 
incite or cause to be incited, the notoriety-seeking preachers 
and reformers of New Jersey in the crusade against Dwyer 
interests. The devil played saint to suit the occasion, but 
Delacy's was confessedly a mission of revenge. He did not 
care a rap so long as he could even up the score with the 
men who had struck at his business, at his most susceptible 
point, his bank roll. Delacy even went so far as to have 
warning conveyed to turf writers antagonistic to him that 
he was a dangerous man. 

Now it would be more derogatory to the writer of such 
a screed than to the persons aimed at to impute parallel 
motives to either of the factions that unfortunately it must 
be confessed still exist in San Francisco racing circles, even 
now that that disturbing element, Ed. Corrigan, is on his 
way to England. The fact that the prevailing tendency 
of turf authorities in these days is undoubtedly too commer- 
cial, certainly can be never held to condone the employ- 
ment of tactics that even in the most piratical commercial 
circles would be tabooed. 

If this be indeed the deadliest turf war San Francisco has 
ever seen that is upon us — as we are being told — there is a 
great chance that it will be only the beginning of an end 
similar to that of New Jersey. Racing is unfortunately an 
institution that has to be perpetually apologizing for its ex- 



istence, and when the men responsible for such an institu- 
tion begin warring among themselves without good and suffi- 
cient reason, the many outsiders who are honestly and can- 
diaiy hostile to the sport are bound to take a hand in the 
game. In the East we were told that if Ed. Corrigan — to 
whom it was nothing new to figure as a disturbing element — 
could be induced to make his exit, all would be peace and 
brotherly love. 

Corrigan has departed, and to-day the situation is more 
involved than ever. Cut bono, gentlemen? 



Mother's Mil*. 

Is best for any baby, but after that comes Gail Borden 
Eagle Brand Condensed Milk for young infants. Thousands 
of letters are received telling of its successful use. Book 
"Babies" sent free. Borden's Condensed Milk Co., N. Y 



Piano lessons, 75c. Experienced teacher. Good testimonials. 
419 Van Ness Avenue. 



— After twenty-four years under the Palace Hotel, Marsh's Jap- 
anese Fine Art Store has moved to 214 Post street. 



About Travel. 

NO. 1. 
In choosing a tour it is safe to follow the majority. 
One can't afford to be careless about so important a 
matter. Your money (certainly) and your comfort 
and health (perhaps) are involved. There is onlv one 
world wide tourist firm— THOS. COOK & SON." Co 
where you will you can't get away from us. "The 
best is always the cheapest." 

Tickets everywhere. Parties to the Hawaiian Is- 
lands. Feb. 2, 18 days, $150; Feb. 13, 30 days, $230. 
To Japan— March 30, 65 days, $G00. All expenses 
included. 

SHALL WE SEND YOU DETAILS ? 

THOS. COOK & SON, 

621 Market St., San Francisco. 

Pacific Coast Underwriting Co. 

Main Office— 507-508-509 Parrott Building. San Francisco. 
Companies Incorporated Bond furnished to guarantee stocks. Oil lands 
ah i.l mining properties for sale or lease. 

E. D. CORING. President. 
W. B. BURROWS. Secretary. 
J. E. FIRMSTONE. Auditor. 

Special Sale of 

Fine French Mixed 
and Assorted Chocolates 
30 cents a pound at 

WICHMAN'S, 754 Market Street. 



business methods and buy an 
American Typewriter for Sir.' Does he 
think I am running a puzzle department? 

The American $11 Typewriter 

is as well made as the Inchest priced 
machines, but more simple. It has stood. 
the test; seven years without a competitor_ 1 
••33,000, IN USE." 
Catalogue and sample oj work free. 

American Typewriter Co. 

F. A. Marriott, Pacific] Coast '.Agent. ~6 1-2 Kearny [St.. San Francisco, 




January 26, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



BUBBLES FROM THE SWIM. 



Bt lady algv. 

Mrs. Crellin. erstwhile fitnilll.- d'Arvttll 
inch a rousing welcome I 
Well, it's a illfllriilt matter to takl 
and d levllla 

prima donna Cnmllle d'Arvlll- was dined aud champ 
by the en lushes. The Hngcrs. Van NeaseS, and nian> 
made her San Francisco visits memorable ones. The tali 
Camllle COOld honestly lay her white hand on bei 
and tell the reporters how mueh she loved our city. 

Her friends not only sent her beautiful wed. line gift! 
when she became Mrs. Crellin. but no one wbi 

earda to the wedding regretted. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dean, 

Judge and Mrs. Van Ness, and all the rest of them she 
the bride with rice and good wishes. 

But if you swallow the society news with your coff. 
may have noticed that her name is not chronic among 
those present." One ingenuous young matron explains it 
thus: "Were all willing to give Mrs. Crellin the friendly 
hand, hut how can we. when we haven't been met half 
way. Some one should have given her a tea, and the Ice 
thus broken, it would have been smooth sailing. You see, 
she only knows a few people, and though they are among 
the best in town, still they've done nothing to help launch 
Mrs. Crellin in the swim. They no doubt entertain her 
hi famillc, but that doesn't argue social success for her. It's 
a shame." 

So you see. society is willing. But before scolding Mrs. 
Crellin's friends for not taking the initiative it might be 
well to consider the other point of view. 

Mrs. Crellin is either not eager, or not ready, as yet, to 
do the I came, they saw, I conquered, act. 
• • • 

I hear that all Manila sits up and takes notice when Mrs. 
Ashton Potter, nte McNutt. appears at a social function. 
Such gowns as this bride has in her trousseau have not been 
seen Manilaward. Small wonder that the Manllaites are 
impressed, for even the favored few here who had glimpses 
of them were enthusiastic. There isn't any use pretending 
that Ruth McNutt did not get an unfair share of the family 
beauty. But when it comes to figure and carrying off her 
clothes Mary can make almost any girl in town wilt. So it's 
not alone her gowns but the way she wears them that is 
winning such genuine praise for Mary McNutt Potter. 

Ruth ana Mrs. McNutt are expected home shortly with 
plenty of wedding cake for the girls to dream on. Gene- 
vieve Goad Martin and her brother Frank are going to turn 
their backs on us for many a moon to come. Not until they 
have traveled the wide world over, the seven seas across, 
will they return. 

* * * 

Wherever young Mrs. Martin goes she leaves a trail of 
dented hearts behind. But so far no amount of persuasion 
has punctured her resolve to frown upon Dan Cupid. 

In another month the wedding bells will again chime for 
a Hopkins-Taylor wedding. Pretty Edna Hopkins has been 
engaged to Will Taylor so long that the "others" have 
grown reconciled to his copyright on her affections, and 
there will be no serious heart-twinges at the marriage. 
Not so when Helen Hopkins became Mrs. Gus Taylor, be- 
fore the lily-like Helen accepted the attentions of young 
Taylor there was a certain very much in earnest young man 
who burned incense at her altar, and evidently the fail- 
Helen was not averse. But there are things that only Cupid 
can explain. The disappointed swain went to the frozen ice 
fields of Alaska to cool his ardor. 

* * * 

How soon? queries society, and Georgie Hopkins and Fred 
McNear blush denial. But Papa Hopkins is evidently "com- 
ing round," for Georgie was permitted to go to the Taylor 
and Scott dinners, to both of which affairs Fred McNear was 
also invited. Only as long ago as the Carolan ball he said 
nay, nay, to Georgie, for no better excuse. It is not Fred- 
die that Hopkins pcre objects to. It's just that he wishes 
marrying was not as catching as the measles. It is rather 
trying on the family to have all the girls taken at the same 
time. 



Anil yet anothi », Tin nsi 

.ifTur the wedding <<t Mai 
ami Lieutenant Crtmmlna was just tl 

Loving hands nt trlendablp nially 

left to hired Anger*. The Jollffc nirls attended to the ih.r.il 

itlons, which were exquisite; man] ofthedalntj dl 
whieh the gueata enjoyed were prepared b) U 
own mother and sisters. 
As Mrs. Lieutenant Crimmons, Margaret Cole will have all 

the luxuries she was KCCUatOmed tO when her father was 
■lire, Hut the Cole girls have not lost anything by their 

• |«rien,es. They've been proven genuine dyed ill tile 
WOOl, Hue blue. 

• • • 

The Duke of Manchester's arrival is awaited with inter- 
• st. There are several club Johnnies in town who take tie' 
same bran.:. They net the Duke When he was in New York. 
.hawing a salary from Hearst for lending his ducal name 
to a weekly squib from .very one else's pen. This Is in ad- 
tion to the interest on what be owed enabled the Duke to 
live according to his rank — as dinner invitations were plen- 
tiful. 

Seriously, I have it that the Duke is really a "good fellow," 
a horn Bohemian in the truest meaning of the word. And 
the Duchess is a very independent sort of girl who does 
as she pleases with never a "beg pardon" to Mrs. Grundy. 

Their short stay here will no doubt cause the usual crop 
of comment and gossip anent their doings. But what's the 
odds? Papa Zimmerman has a few less ducats, daughter 
has the duke, and the duke has no more debts. So they're 
;:ll as happy as clams at high tide. 



PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A sovereign remedy. One dose will cure a cough. It never 
fails, 'iry it. Price, 25 cents. George Dahlbender & Co., 
214 Kearny street. For sale by all druggists. 




London Assurance 



Ocean Marine 



Capital Subscribed $4,482,750 

Capital Paid Up 2,241,375 

Assets 19,195,14c 

Capital Subscribed $5,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 500,000 

Assets 2,502,050 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide. 

RESTAURANTS. 

POODLE DOG Restaurant, N. B. corner Eddy and Mason Sts.. 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, Main 429. 

A. B. Blanco & B. Brun. 

BAY STATE OYSTER HOUSE AND GRILL, ROOM, 15 Stock- 
ton street and 109 O'Farrell street. N. M. Adler, Proprietor. 
Telephone, Main 5057. 

BERGEZ RESTAUR ANT— Rooms for ladies and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

NEVADA RESTAURANT, 126-130 Geary street. Private rooms 

for parties. 'Phone, Main 1179. Noel P. Loupy, Proprietor. 

MA1SON TORTONI, French Rotisserle, 111 O'Farrell strcut. 
Private dining rooms; banquet hall. S. Constantinl, Pro- 
prletor. 

HOTELS. 

PALACE AND GRAND HOTELS— Connected Dy overhead pas- 
sageway; under one management. Palace Grill Rooms a fea- 
ture. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL— a quiet home centrally located; first- 
class. Wm. B. Hooper, Manager. 

RUSS HOUSE — J. S. Young, Proprietor. Leading business and 
family hotel. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 

W. F. GREANY, 827 Brannan street. Selections on approval; any 
place in the world. 

BOILER MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Ironworks, 314-316-3*8 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 




Society seems to be at last waking up to the realization 
of the fact that the season is drawing to its close. All kinds 
of gay doings have been arranged, new cards are issued 
every day, and for the three weeks between this and Mardi 
Gras there will be but little lime for rest. Probably the best 
and pleasantest news of all is of the ball which Mrs. Win- 
throp Lester purposes giving on February 5th. La Jeunesse 
ball is named for the 8th, the Burlingame Club ball for the 
15th, and Mardi Gras for the 19th of February; among those 
hoped for are the balls of Miss Kate Dillon and Mrs. George 
Whittell, both of which in the event of their being given are 
sure to be brilliant affairs. 

There was a good deal crowded into the closing days of 
last week: Mrs. Fry's luncheon at the University Club on 
Thursday was for married ladies only, fifteen of them being 
seated at a bountifully spread table; in the evening Miss 
Azalea Keyes made her initial appearance as a dinner hos- 
tess, since her recent return from the Orient, when Mrs. 
Eleanor Martin, Mrs. Salisbury and her daughter, Mrs. 
Keyes, were the only matrons among the thirty-one guests 
who enjoyed the young hostess's hospitality; on Friday there 
was Mrs. Louis Monteagle's tea, Mrs. H. L. Van Wyck's 
first reception, and Miss Kate Dillon's "at home," which was 
followed by a dinner, and then the party adjourned to the 
Friday Fortnightly dance at Cotillion Hall; on Saturday 
Miss Delia Mills gave a luncheon d'adieu to Miss Elizabeth 
Huntington, who with her mother and sister left for the East 
and Europe this week. 

The tea given last Saturday afternoon by Mrs. Ira Pierce 
for the formal debut in society of her daughter Miss Sophia, 
was one of the most elaborate of this or any other season. 
It was indeed a difficult matter to take in the tea which was 
given by Mrs. Smith at Arbor Villa in Oakland on Saturday 
r.fternoon. yet some ladies did actually accomplish it. Mrs. 
Smith never does anything by halves, so the afternoon tea 
was followed by a dinner, at which the recent bride and 
groom, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Ransome, were guests of honor. 

Mrs. Emma Hunt's tea on Saturday was a good-bye to her 
son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bostwick, 
who sailed by the steamer Sonoma on Thursday en route to 
Corea, where they will remain for a lengthened period. 

The Steinhart ball at the Century Club and the Chrysan- 
themum's oance at Cotillion Hail were among the events of 
Saturday evening. 

As guests of honor at dinners and other entertainments 
Miss Edna Hopkins and her fiance. Will Taylor, have been 
taking the lead. Among other gatherings complimentary 
to them have been Miss Edith McBean's card party of thirty, 
Mrs. W. H. Taylor's dinner, which was enjoyed by thirty- 
sk guests, and the dinner given by Mrs. Henry Scott, who 
played hostess to a party of twenty-sis. 

"Becky Sharp" was the loadstone which drew out so 
many theatre parties on Monday evening, in spite of the rain. 
Of these the largest was the one given by Mr. Knox Maddox, 
which had Miss Eleanor Robinson as central figure. It was 
composed of thirty young people under the chaperonage of 
Mrs. Robinson; the party first dined at the University Club, 
and after the performance supped at the Palace. Smaller 
ones were given by the Lesters, the Hopkins, the Morgans, 
and Miss Dillon. 

Miss Edna Hopkins made her final appearance Tuesday as 
a maiden hostess at the luncheon she gave at the Univer- 
sity Club. Mrs. W. J. Irwin appeared in the role of hostess 
for the first time this season on Wednesday, when she gave 
a luncheon at the University Club; Mrs. Gus Taylor had her 
second "at home," there was a Japanese tea at the Century 
Club, Mrs. Henry Scott gave a dinner at which Miss Lucy 
King was chief guest, and in the evening Bishop and Mrs. 
Nichols held their annual reception at the Occidental Hotel. 
Mrs. Sara Palmer was a card hostess on Thursday; Mrs. 
Follis and Miss Kate Dillon both held receptions yester- 



day, when also took place Mrs. George Martin's second "at 
home" and the second of the VanWyck teas, and last even- 
ing there was an extra large sized hop at the Presidio, and 
the Entre Nous Club gave their fourth dance of the season 
in Maple Hall. To-day the Sketch Club will give a tea in 
their pretty quarters. 

Among the good things for next week will be Miss Bertie 
Bruce's luncheon in honor of Miss Lucy King, on Tuesday, 
Mrs. Fry's card party at Sorosis Club rooms, and the lun- 
cheon at the University Club, of which Mrs. Edwin Dimond 
will be hostess on Thursday; on Thursday evening the 
Misses Ida and Mary Gibbons give a dance for young people, 
and on Friday the Fortnightlies will have another of their 
gatherings. 

The ball to be given next Saturday evening at Maple Hall 
for the purpose of raising funds for the Mount Zion Hospi- 
tal will undoubtedly be the most brilliant of its kind given 
this winter; the ladies who have the arrangements in charge 
are the very cream of our Jewish matrons, and they have 
been and are indefatigable in their efforts to make it a 
success. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pierce will receive their tea calls next Fri- 
day and on tne following one. 

The wedding of Miss Julia Peyton and Joyn Johns, which 
took place last week at the home of the Peytons on Cali- 
fornia street, was one of interest to old San Franciscans, 
from the fact that the bride's mother was one of our early- 
day belles. She was the eldest and most beautiful of Mrs. 
Sam Herman's lovely daughters, her step-sister being Mrs. 
Harry Palmer, who has always lived in Paris, and Mrs. Hall 
McAllister, than whom there was not for many years a more 
brilliant star in our social firmament. Archbishop Riordan 
officiated at the Peyton-Johns wedding, which was a very 
quiet one, and the Crocker villa at Burlingame has been 
the scene of the honeymoon. 

February promises to be a month of weddings, the first 
week of it seeing two of much prominence. These will 
be the weddings of Miss Edna Hopkins and Will Taylor, on 
Wednesday, the sixth; and of Miss Eleanor Wood and Dr. 
C. F. Welty, which will be solemnized at St. Luke's Church 
on the afternoon of Thursday, the seventh. Miss Mollie 
Thomas and Thurlow McMullin will be among February's 
list of "happy couples." and February 26th is the date set 
for the wedding of Miss Emma Fortman and W. E. Stevens. 

A recently made known engagement is that of Miss Bertha 
Foote and Stanley Jackson, and an announcement of Monday 
last was of the engagement of Miss Flora Howell and Louis 
T. Janes of Mill Valley, which adds one more to the weddings 
we are to have in the near future. 

The Olympic Club circus, which was spoken of in these 
columns several weeks ago, is named for the month of 
March, and great things are promised and anticipated. 

Mrs. Annie Grant Fry has named the second and third 
Fridays in February to receive her friends at her residence 
on Webster street. 

The Russ Wilsons and Downey Harveys are home again 
from their holiday trip to New York; Mrs. and Miss McNutt 
are among the passengers by the steamship China from 
Japan, and Miss Mollie Phelan will soon be with us again 
from her trip to Europe. Mrs. George Gibbs leaves next 



A Skin of beauty Is a Joy Forever. 

k R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIF1ER. 



D f 




Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Mi. th Patches, Rash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and duties detection. It lias stood the 
test of 51 years and 1h so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
Dr. X* A. Sayre said to a lady of the 
haut-ton fa patient): "As you ladies 
will use them, I recommend 'Gour 
aud's Crenm' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
hy all drnccistM and Fancy-coods 
Dealers in the United States, Canada* 
ard Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
37 Great Jones street, N, "V. 



January 26. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



19 



*o*k for her annual trip abroad, which will oxtaod until 
noar midsummer. On* of tha moat popular elrl-. In the 
»wlm will soon bo nnione the miss-ins. as oo Wc In. - lay of 
"<•*< :■ Drown will accompanj b family 

whrn lhi-y laara for a trip to Kuropr, which will 1^ 
tandad on- Mr. Wlllnnl Drown will not 
but will remain In this city. 

■ r an.l li.-r daughter. Miss Emma, arc don 
lental Hotel for the season; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Watson, a-. Kmnia S are among the arrh 

the week at the California. 

-n.l Mrs. W. .1. Younger have terminate. I what 
most delightful visit to San Kranelsi o of several 
Miss Azalea Keyes is contemplating another trip to the land 
of the Mikado, and an absence of several months. A little 
bird has been busy whispering some interesting news aneal 
this charming young lady. 

Mr. and Mrs. 11. \V. Titus announce the engagement of 
their daughter. Elsie Weber, to H. Charles Taggert. of San 
Jose. The wedding will take place in the near future. 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Boole of Seattle are visiting 
friends In San Francisco. 

The Hotel Del Monte, by dint of its perfect accommoda- 
tions and cuisine, as well as its unsurpassed natural advan- 
tages and commodious grounds, keeps its full patronage of 
fashionable people from the principal cities of the State 
and from the East. The Hotel del Monte is numbered among 
a few other seaside hotels in the country where the winter 
may be counted as a season. 

Lovers of nature are staying away from the city to linger 
among the (towers and lawns of San Rafael where, from the 
Hotel Rafael the golf links and the beautiful Marin hills 
are easily accessible. Visitors in California have spread the 
fame of this hostelry abroad, with the result that the Hotel 
Rafael is as well known in New England as in our own 
State. 

A most enjoyable card party was given last Tuesday by 
Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton at her home in Hyde street, at 
which she entertained thirty young ladies. The prize winners 
were Miss Sophia Price. Miss Olive Holbrook, Miss Maye 
Colburn, Miss Charlotte Ellinwood, and Miss Bessie Cole. 

Miss Alma Berglund, assisted by Mrs. J. E. Birmingham, 
will give her farewell concert at Sherman, Clay & Co/s 
Hall, on Tuesday evening. January 29th. 



A circular is out for W. C. Morrow's fourth series of lec- 
tures to begin in February, on "The Art of Writing for Pub- 
lication." The talks as outlined are replete with the com- 
bined originality and common sense that have made for 
Mr. Morrow a name both as teacher and writer of literature. 



In the recent decorations of the Legion of Honor given 
at Paris in connection with the Exposition, San Francisco 
received her share of glory, Michael H. de Young and Wm. 
G. Irwin being accorded the rank of Chevaliers in that 
honorable order. 



COLLEGE OF PALHISTRY 

This fascinating study can now be acquired easily and is within the reach 
of all ! The Chirological College of California and The Academy of Science 
of New York have opened in this city, and will cive a thorough training in 
Scientific Palmistry and Chiracter Study. We furni-h course, wlih books, 
for 81.2, in classes of i en; *151n classes of five; and for private pupils 825. 
We will give any • ne a full and complete Life Beading, written, with an 
elegant print of the hand, for $ j and 85. Oral Readings $1 and 82. Kveniners 
by appointment. Will be pleaded to explain further particular* between 
the hours of 9 to 12 a. m- and 1 to 5 p. m-, at 309 Powell street. Parlors 20-21- 
Mrs. Baldwin, Vice-President and Instructor. 

In this issue of the News Letter ; b printed a cut of the Atlas Pipe 
Wrench with a demonstration of how this ingenious tool works 
without crushing or denting a pipe. Such an invention has long 
been needed by pipe-fitters, and has solved an important problem. 



Competent teacher will coach pupils in public school studies and 
give lessons to ladies desiring to improve themselves. Apply 
2407 Clay street. 

Child character study. Professional adaptation; diagnosis. Mrs. Wm 
Me Man u j, 731 Gue rrero street. 



Artistic Hardwood Grilles. 
Made to order. Prices reasonable. Pacific Grille Co., Adams' 
Building, N. E. Corner Sutter and Kearny streets. 



Crosse & Blackwell 

Purveyors to the Qjeen 




Received the 

Grand Prix 

highest possible Award 

For Pickles, Sauces, Malt Vinegar, 
Jams, Potted Meats, etc., 

at the 

PARIS EXHIBITION 1900. 



The San Francisco 
Jockey Club. 

Third meeting from Monday, January 21, to Saturday, Feb. 9. inclusive 

AT TANFORAN PARK, 

Six races each day including Hurdle races and Steeplechases. 

The Winter Handicap, Saturdav, JaDuary26, 
The Washington Park Handicap, Wednesday, Jan. 30. 
The Eclipse Stakes. Saturday, February 2. 
The Alexandra Park Handicap, "Wednesday, Feb. 6. 
The California Oaks, Saturday, February 9. 
Trains leave Third and Townsend streets for Tanforan Park at 7, 10:45, 
11:30 a. m., 12:30, 1, 1:30 and 2 p. m. Valencia stree' 5 minutes later. Trains 
returning to the city at 4:15 p, in., and immediately after the last race. 
Admission to the grounds, including railroad fare, 81.25. 

SPECIAL — The 2 p. m. is for the convenience of those not wishing to 
reach the track in time for the first race. 

Milton S. Latham, Secretary. 



FELIX'S ROTI5SERIE, 

Felix Gouailnardou, proprietor, (formerly with 
Jack's Rotisseriej, 537 California street, below 
Kearny. Private rooms for families and banquets- 
Telephone Black 29013 



H. Isaac Jones, M. D. Eye . Ea p, NoS e, and Throat. 

Office— 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 
streets, S. P. Hours, 10 a. m. to 4. p. m. 




Sunday by appointment. 



Tel. Grant 101, 



Worthington Ames 

Member Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Sale Deposit Building. 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1381 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building. San Francisco. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 




BANKING 



Stolen From Thieves. 

"Excuse me for breaking into the conversation," said 
Senator Sorgham, as he approached the musicians who were 
discussing their art, "but who is this man you are talking 
about?" "We have talked of several." "But the man you 
h'St mentioned. You said ne had such a beautiful and un- 
erring touch. I am willing to pay such a man good money 
to get out and work on my campaign fund." 

"What's the trouble over there in the corner?" said the 
living skeleton to the fat woman. "The two-headed girl is 
having a quarrel with herself." "Just so; but what about?" 
"She says she'd rather be four-legged than two-headed, so 
that she could hang up more Christmas stockings." 

"In union there is strength," remarked the moralizer, as 
he approached the free lunch department and applied some 
mustard to a cheese sandwich. "Oh. I don't know," re- 
joined the bartender, as he took a quart bottle that was half 
full of whiskey and filled it up with water. 

Politician. — My boy, the door to every successful business i 
is labeled "Push." Thoughtful Youth — Isn't your business a 
successful one sir? Politician — Well, yes, I flatter myself 
that it is very successful. Why do you ask that? Thought- 
ful Youth — Because, sir, I see your door is labeled "Pull." 

"Ikey!" "Yes, fader." "You hafe examine der shtock in 
drade? You see all those goodts in der shtore?" "Yes, 
fader. Ve haf blenty of goodts und oh! such peautiful 
somples. Fine, fine! Der beobles vill puy all ve got, aindt 
it?" "Oh, but Ikey." "Yes, fader." "Sell der goodts, mein 
sohn. Put dondt you sell der somples!" 

"I want a dog that will look terribly fierce, but don't ever 
bite." "I guess you'd better get an iron one, mum." 

"Jinks has no faculty for keeping money." "Lets it go to 
whoever asks him for it, I believe!" "Why, I'm told that 
even his wife can get money from him, if he has it!" 

"I am sorry for you, my boy," said the old man. "I feel 
certain you are about to wed a woman that does not know 
how to cook." "It might be worse, father," answered the 
young man. "She has promised never to try to learn." 

Eager Freshman — I'm sorry I cut, Professor, but I really 
couldn't get back in time. I was detained by important 
business. Professor — So you wanted two more days of 
grace, did you? Eager Freshman — (off his guard) — No, sir. 
of Laura." 

"Oh, my! shame on you," cried the old gentleman: "do 
you know what becomes of little boys who swear?" "Yep," 
replied the little boy, "they grow up an' git ter be drivers 
of fire-ingynes, an' dat's w'at I wanter be." 

He. — Has your father any objections to my calling on 
you?" She. — (An heiress). — "No! But he said you couldn't 
call on him." 

The which reminds me that America has its election para- 
doxes. For instance, it is pointed out that most of its great 
contractors are expansionists. 

Cahill. — Was the shtrike a success? Cassidy. — It was! 
Afther being out six weeks we succaded in gittin' back our 
jobs!" 

"Can I take my wheel inside?" "I should think you could 
with that mouth." 



Swain's Bakery and Restaurant on Sutter street has 

stood ever since the early days as a landmark to the best 
people of the city who desire to take a quiet, elegantly 
served luncheon down town or to order the best pies, pas- 
tries, breads, ices or chicken-sandwiches for domestic use. 
Swain's service is known to he perfect and his cuisine is 
reputed to be unexcelled in the city of San Francisco. 



Fay & Foster, at the Grand Hotel Cafe, serve from 

11 till 2 daily a commercial lunch to do credit to San Fran- 
cisco as "the city of commercial lunches." It will save you a 
trip home. 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital. 12.000.000 Surplus. 11,000.000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits. October 1, 1900, 83.514.063.S2. 

WILLIAM ALVORD .President I CHARI.BS R. BISHOP, Vloe-Pres't 

ALLEN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. PRENTISS SMITH Ass't Cashier I I. P. MOULTON.....2d Ass't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— MesBrs. Laldlaw & Co.: the Bank of New York. N. B. A. 
Baltimore — The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago — Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis — Boatman's Bank. 
Virginia City, Nev.— Agency o! The Bank o! California. London — MeBSrs 
N. M. Rothschild &. Sons. ParlB — Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin — 
Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschait. China, Japan, and East Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India. Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia. Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit Issued available In all parts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

632 CALIFORNIA STREET. S. F. 

Deposits July 1, 1900. 826,952,875 Reserve Fund $218,593 

Paid-up Capital 1,000,000 Contingent Fund 439.608 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors — Henry F. Allen. Thomas Maeee, W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin. Jacob 
Barlh, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made in checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo it Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. in., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo X Go. Bank 

N. E. Cob. Sansohe and Suttee Sts. 
JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KINO, Manager F. L. LLPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER. Second Assistant Cashier. 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits Dec. 31,1900 $8,620,223.88 

Branches— New York City, H, B. Parsons, Cashier; Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly, Cashier; Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

DLRECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Chrlsteson, Oliver Eldrldge. 

Henry E. Huntington, Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, 

John Bermlngham, Dudley Evans. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. B26 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,263,559.17 

Capital actually paid up In Cash 1,000 900 00 

Deposits Dec. 31. 1900 .29,589,864.13 

BOARD OF DLRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker; FirBt Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier, A. H. R 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller: General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. SMnhart. E. Route H, B. Russ, N Ohlandt. John Lloyd, and I. N 
Walter. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid TJp Capital $300,000 

Jambs D. Puklan, President S. G. Muepht, Vice-President 

George A. Stoby, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DLRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy, John A. Hooper, James 
Muffin. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal, James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo St Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CALIFORNIA 
Subscribed CapltaJ..$10,000.000 Profit and Reserve Fund.. .$210,000 
Paid-in- Capital 1,500,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on Improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help Its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent, interest on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office — 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager 

Crocker-Woolworth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital $1,000 000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kline. Cashier 

W. E. Bbown. Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr., AaMstant Ca>hier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond. W. E Brown. C. E. Green, G. \V. 
Kline. HenryJ. Orooker. G. W. Scott. 



January 26. 1901. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 




THE FIRST DAY. 
The -tlmri* flMllwl. In lUrp>r« Ui>iim r > 

I sleop. who yesterday wns tired, 

I, who was v.-ry wary, 

I have forgot all things desired, 
Or what were bail or what were 
Wan roses Mrs upon my breast 

And make a pillow for my head ; 
I know not am I bantu. 1 or blest. 

Who am most quite — being dead. 

Perchance to-morrow Ood may come 
With awfulness of mouth ami brow, 

And bid me speak, who would be dumb. 
My sins of yesterday; but DOW 
I have forgotten deed anil vow, 

I have been soothed and comforted. 
And clothed with peace, I know not how. 

Who am most happy — being dead. 

A moment since one touched my hair, 

There was hot tears upon my face; 
To-morrow I may wake and care 

And hunger for a lost embrace; 

But now one dim, delicious space. 
My joys are done, my tears are shed; 

I may lie still, who have the grace 
Of all forgetting — being dead. 



THREE KISSES. 

(Pf et Wheeler, in New York Press J 

When first I kissed you, 'twas on your mouth. 

Red as a blackbird's cherry. You recall 
'Twas spring, the soft air smelling of the south. 

The whole world gay and you gay most of all. 
You laughed — that low, sweet, tender, birdlike trill 
Which made the very bobolink be still. 

When first I kissed you. 'twas upon your mouth. 

Molded just round enough. 'Twas autumn then 
And you were graver grown, and did not speak, 

But seemed in wonder at the ways of men. 
And yet you smiled. So dear a smile it was 
That it seemed sudden summer over us. 

When last I kissed you, dearest Heart of Gold, 
My lips just brushed your forehead. You were sad, 

And it was winter. All the world was old. 

But at the touch, my love swelled fierce and glad ; 

For then I felt you tremble, and saw fall 

Two great, slow tears. Ah, that was best of all! 



THE UNATTAINABLE. 
(By Mary Bowdoin Pfiee. in Lippincotts.) 
One night (the heavens shone supremely grand) 

A little child looked up and questioned why 

He might not touch a bit of that bright sky, 
Hold one fair star within his eager hand. 
He could not count them; thicker than the sand 

Along some endless waste of sea they lie, 

And yet so far away, so very high 
Beyond his reach. He could not understand. 
And as I listen to the childish longing, 

It finds a ready echo in my heart; 
Dreams born of wild desire come madly thronging 

In which I have no fleeting share nor part; 
And like a little child I cannot see 
Why so much brightness shines too high for me. 



BANKING 



THE OVERTURE. 

(By Charles Edward Thomas, in The Cosmopolitan.) 

Old memories and the whispering ghosts 

Of dear dead days when Love was young — 

And then the lisping of an April rain. 

That steals across the meadows, and the song 

Of one glad robin in the evening light. 

Singing as though his heart must break for joy— 

And after these, a merrier strain, 

Light laughter, borne across the years, 

Of children that I knew, at play 

Within a garden long ago. 

But more than all, and far above and through it all, 

I heard the voice of one I loved, 

Faint, falling down to earth and me 

Through some far, golden rift in paradise. 



London and San Francisco Bank, um«*i 

Oi OAUrORIfTA STRUT, 

HF\D OFFIf'K- 71 Lumfentf •iMrt. I^.n.|..n 

C»i»llal Authored. t-V-> rnpltAl Paid Up. ll.W0.000. 

!Mrccli.r« -Henry G FTOU. London: OhaVlfM IMwurd Hrrllirr- 

ion. London; Christian da Galena, Ban Pranel : Charlt 

London: John I. Howard. San Pranctaoo; Bendli Knppal, London; Ifor- 

mmti i>. Itl'leotii. San Fraocflaoo; \rihur BorlTOMr, London, 

InOpMlOT Ofl Hr*mhM, Ou*U»v Prlodotiobi 
\ir«*nt« In Now York. HoXIcJ. P. Kot|Wl A Co. 

BBAlrORBBi Portland, Oracon:Tnoonim. Washington. 

I.ctlor* <>! credit i«nuc«l ftvuilnhlc f>>r traveler* and Iht pOTOhOM ol im-r- 
rhnndUc In any city of ilu- r/OTld Deal In foreign and domestic exchange 
Accounts oi country bank* received. Term* on Application. 

W, Ma« KiXTosn. Mutineer 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated The Bunk of British Columbia 

rTBAJD OFFICE-Toionto. 

Paid rjp Capital. tB.000,000. Reserve Fund, $3,000,000. 

Agg*egate Resources over $86,000,000. 

DIRE(TORS-IIon Geo A Cox. President; B- E, Walker. Cicneral 

M nnnger; J. H. riummer, Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OFFICE-GO Lombard St-. E C . H. Cameron Alexander. Manager 
NEW YORK OFFICE— If, Exchange Place. A'ex- Laird and Win. Gray. 
Agents, 
BRANCHES— 

Ontario. Ontario: Quebec: Montreal Manitoba: Winnipeg; Yukon 
District: Dawson, White Horse: British Columbia: Atlin. Cranbrootc, 
Fernie. Greenwood, Kamloops. Nanaimo. Nelson. New Westminster. 
Rossland.Sandon, Vanoouver, Victoria. In the United States — New York. 
N. Y. San Fianoisco. Cah Seattle, Wash. Portland, Ore- Skngway. Alaska- 
Bankers in London— The Bank of Scotland: Messrs- Smith. Payne «fe Smiths 
Bankers in New York— The American Exchange National Bank. 
Agents in Chicago — The Northern Trust Company. Agents in New Orleans. 
—The Commercial National B-uik. 
San Francisco Office: Walter Powell, Manager. A. Kalns, Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Coe. Sansomk and Suttee Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 82,500.000 Pald-Up Capital. 82,000,000 

Reserve Fund. 8925,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street. London. E. C. 

AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 
Boulevard Polssonlere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits Issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. C. ALTSCHUL, Managers. 

R. AXTSOHUL, Caehler. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco. 
Jas. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pieece Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, 8500,000 

DIRECTORS— James K. Wilson, Wm. J. Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce. C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drex el & Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank, St. Louis 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan. Harjes & Co, 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Franolsco. 
Authorized Capital, 81,000.000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve. 8390,000 

Authorized to act as Executor. Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, Arms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money In Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and sayings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers — F. Kronenberg, President; W- A. Frederick, vIce-President: H. 
Brunner, Cashier 

Board of Directors— F. Kronenberg. W. A. Frederiok, Fred A- Kuhls, E, 
A. Denlcke, A. G. Wieland. Fred Woerner, J. O. Rued, Fred C. Siebe- 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sanbome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized 86.000.000 Paid Up 81.500.000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STEINHART. P. N. LLLIENTHAL. Managers. 



Security Savings Bank 



Interest paid on deposits. 



222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
Loans made. 
DIRECTORS. 



William Alvord 
William Babcock 
Adam Grant 



S. L. Abbot, Jr. 
O. T>. Baldwin 

W.S.Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. McCutchen 
R. H. Pease 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 




When asking natives of Palestine to show a village 

or a ruin mentioned in your guide-book, but of the exact 
locality of which you are in doubt, never ask the leading 
question. You are, we will say, looking for the ruins of 
Burj Sur, on your way to Hebron, and you meet a native 
passing by. Don't ask: "Is this the ruin of Burj Sur?" 
Either to please you or to get a baksheeh, he will, says a 
writer in the Traveler, invariably say: "Yes, sir, this is the 
place," although he may be as ignorant of it as a Chinese. 
To get at the truth ask him thus: "There is, they say, a 
ruin in this region called the ruin of Murber or Buj Fur. Do 
you know it?" "Yes, sir," he will reply, "the name Is 
Burj Sur. But this is not the place," and very likely will 
lead you to the true one. 

Mr. Hughes, a New Yorker famous for his practical 

joking, has put the judges of a horseshow in a ridiculous 
light. Under an assumed name, says the Yorkshire Post's 
New York correspondent, he entered a horse in the saddle 
class, and at the trials his daughter rode the animal round 
the ring. The horse and another were finally selected as the 
most worthy of the class, but in the final trial the other 
animal was awarded the blue ribbon. When Mr. Hughes 
learned his horse had just missed carrying off the prize, he 
soberly announced that his entry was a cast-off tramcar 
horse. The judges are now busy explaining how they were 
fcoled. Mr. Hughes two years ago entered a stray tomcat 
id the Oriental female class of the Cat Show, and a special 
prize was awarded him by the judges. 

The truth of this story is vouched for by the Paris cor- 
respondent of the Sketch: On the occasion of President 
Kruger's visit to Europe with General Joubert, he went to a 
tailor in Amsterdam. The General ordered a suit that was 
to cost £ 6. Kruger said : "I would have given you an order, 
but I cannot afford that price. I got this suit in London for 
£3 10s." The tailor simply said: "Would you mind my 
looking at the name of the firm on the collar?" and having 
read it, shrugged his shoulders. It was that of the most 
expensive firm in the West Enu. Joubert turned to Kruger 
and said: "That was hardly the truth, sir." Kruger re- 
plied: "Business is business: but, as long as he has bowled 
me out, I will give him a line." There be many ways of 
lying, but that was one. 

An owner of one of the largest sawmills in the Mid- 
lands is trying a novel experiment. He is feeding his 
horses on sawdust, and, strange though it may at first sight 
seem, they are evidently thriving upon it. What first gave 
him the idea, says the Free Lance, was this: While in- 
specting his mills one day he noticed several loose horses 
apparently enjoying a meal. Upon his approaching them he 
discovered that the food they were eating so ravenously was 
nothing more than sawdust newly thrown out from one of 
the mills. 

The stirring events of the past year have brought 

England to a frame of mind which cannot, says the Globe, 
tolerate anything like decadence and fashionable ennui. 
Brittons, therefore, will celebrate the last Christmas of the 
century with as much jovial abandon as their great fore- 
fathers celebrated the first; the children will shout them- 
selves hoarse round the Christmas tree, and Blind Man's 
Buff will find many a sedate father groping cheerfully 
among his giggling children like a General searching for 
De Wet. 

The use of the prefix "Honorable" is the subject of 

much adverse comment in the American press. Most of the 
newspapers advocate a discontinuance of the custom, which, 
by the way, is in America entirely due to the newspapers 
themselves. The remedy is in their own hands. Let them, 
says the Louisville Courier, simply substitute for '"Hon." 
the sensible and manly "Mr." when printing men's names, 
and the reform will be accomplished. Already "Hon." is 
used as a mark of ridicule as often as otherwise. 




Statistics recently compiled show that more single men 
than married commit suicide, but that more married women 
than single reach a similarly melancholy end. Thus a man 
of delicate feelings is to put in a position of much embarrass- 
ment. If he feel an impulse to marry so as to avoid doing 
himself a fatal violence he realizes that the safeguard he 
would throw about himelf would imperil the longevity of the 
woman in the case. The only satisfactory solution is to con- 
clude that the statistician is a liar. 



After an illness of several months Mrs. Annie S. Taylor, 
wife of Colonel C. L. Taylor, former Republican candidate 
for Mayor of San Francisco, died Wednesday at the resi- 
dence of her daughter, Mrs. J. A. Margo, 1919 Devisadero 
street. Mrs. Taylor, though a native of Maine, came with 
her husband to this city at an early date. Funeral services 
were held at the First Unitarian Church on Thursday after- 
noon. 



$100 Reward $100. 
The readers of this paper will be pleased to learn that there isat lea°t one 
dr«-aded disease that science has been able toc'rein all it* states, and that 
is Catarrh. Hall's Catarrh Cure is the only positive cure known to the 
medical fraternity- Catarrh being a constitutional disease, requires a con- 
stitutional treatment. H'll's Catarrh Cure is taken internally, acting 
directly upon the blood and mucous surfaces of the system, thereby des- 
troying the foundation of the disease, and giving the patient strength by 
building up the constitution and assisting nature in doing its work. The 
proprietors have so much faith in Hs curative powers, that they ofTer One 
Hundred Dollars for any case that it fails to cure. Send for list of Testi- 
monials. 

Address, P. J. CHENEY & CO.. Toledo, O- 
e*T" Sold by Druggists, 75c. 

Hall's Family Pills are the best. 



—John W. Carmany still makes shirts, stylish and well-flttlng. 
He is at room 32, second floor Chronicle Building. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



SOUTHF1ELD WELLINGTON COAL 
with which cook can please all. 



'9J Vintage will not be in your market until 
APRIL J, 190J. 





fcCK/TCll/ 




Full Quart Bottles . . $t.25 
One Gallon Jugs . . . 3.80 
Half Gallon Jugs . . 2.00 
Twice its price will buy none better. 



January 26. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



BROWN'S 61 



TROCHES 



"Tfc* Kv.t *r»par,tlrt« for fnljt. roach. 
■ ■4 a.thaa." 
M»s. v \. * (TMl\. T«af»raa» Url.rrr. 
" Pr»-r»l.»»ll. Ik. txl " 

sit. BHti » v int ii i ii m. 



One of those 

Narrow tsca.pes. 



rriBge party of three women and 
one man. distantly approaching rail- 
way tracks at which Is an automatic 
••lei trie gong, arranged to ring violent- 
ly from the time trains are within 
hundred yards of crossing.) 
First Woman (on front seat with 
man who Is driving I — Now we're com- 
ing to the railroad. Jim. Oh, I wish 
we had the other horse. 

Second Woman (on back seat) — 
Why? Is this horse afraid of the cars? 
First Woman— Oh. a little. 

Third Woman (on back seat) — He's 
awfully afraid. I know he is. I've been 
driving with them berore. 

Second Woman — Is he. Mr. Bates? 

Man — No. not in the Ii 

First Woman — Why. Jim. you know- 
he is. Think of how he acted the time 
Auntie and Cousin Sophie were in. 

Second Woman — You can't see the 
track very well from here, can you? 
I should think it must be a very dan- 
gerous crossing. 

Man (soothingly) — The gong rings 
in plenty of time. 

Third Woman — Does it always ring? 

Second Woman — Sometimes there's 
something the matter with them — they 
don't. 

First Woman (under her breath, to 
man) — Jim. I hear something coming. 
I know I do. Just stop and wait a 
minute. 

Second Woman (taking alarm) — ! 
Oh. I do, too. 

Third Woman — Oh, so do I — I cer- 
tainly do, Mr. Bates. 

First Woman — And the gong isn't 
ringing at all. 

Mixed Guorus — 

"Oh, Mr. Bates, please wait!" 

"Jim — wait!" 

"Please let me get out. I know I'm a 
goose, but I'd so much rather. I " 

"Me too!" 

"Jim — are you crazy?" 

Man (who has been driving steadily 
on) — There's no train whatever, and 
we're not within an eighth of a mile 
of that track. 

First Woman — Yes; but you know 
with this horse 

Second and Third Woman — Yes — 
with this horse 

Second Woman — Mrs. Bates says he 
is afraid of the cars. 

First Woman — They ought to have a 
flag-man here. 

Third Woman — Yes, they ought. 

Second Woman — It's a shame. 

(All three women hold their breath 
as the carriage comes within one hun- 
dred feet of track. They look at one 
another. First woman clutches arm 
of man). 

Distant whistle. 
Women (all together)— Oh!— ! !— ! ! ! 

Man (driving steadily on) — That 
was a factory whistle, two miles away. 

Second Woman — Oh, but there's 
smoke. 

Third Woman — It's coming this 
way. 

First Woman — Oh, it's coming aw- 



fullj ' ,f thn*o fl% 

Ilk* IlKhtnlnn 

y on. and swal- 
i In hlii lb 

(All ton 

irrlnge im- 

• to irads of 

Ml. Tilly about In 
vain Btten both ways at 

The tra. | , | |q breath 

Silence, which cms way as hind 
wheels safely clear rails to murmur 
of thanksgiving .it deliverance from 
Budden death.) 

First Woman (cheerfully)— There 
are such awful accidents at cross- 
ings. 

Second Woman (still more cheer- 
fully i — Almost every day you read of 
one in the papers. 

Third Woman I laughing hysteri- 
cally! — I always feel so much better 
when I'm safely over. 

I When carriage has reached dis- 
tance of one half mile beyond the 
track, freight train is heard to pass 
in the distance), 

First Woman (triumphantly) — 
There! What did I tell you. Jimmy 
Bates? 

Second Woman — And the gong 
didn't ring. 

Third Woman — Oh. I'm so thankful 
we got over all right. 

Man (grimly) — It was one of those 
hairbreadth escapes! — Grace S. Rich- 
mond, in Truth. 



MUNICIPAL LODGING HOUSES. 

The modern city the world over 
is becoming more and more concerned 
about the welfare of its inhabitants 
— particularly of its unfortunate ones. 
All sorts of schemes for relieving the 
sufferings of such as are "down on 
their luck" have been projected and 
successfully carried forward. The mu- 
nicipal lodging house is among the 
latest ventures. The cities of Europe 
and Great Britain have led the way, 
and the United States cities have fol- 
lowed in their wake. In Boston the 
institution is known as the "wayfar- 
ers' lodge," and is in charge of the 
poor board. The plan was inaugura- 
ted by former Mayor Quincy, and since 
its inception seven years ago, has ac- 
commodated some 28,000 lodgers and 



" Incurable'' Dropsy 
Speedily Cured 

B> [he f.reat Specialist in Treat- 
ing Weak and Diseased Hearts, 
Franklin Miles, M. D., LL B., 
of Chicago, HI. 

■Ill tii. I frro n •<-. ,r. 00 f A 

m "" 1 w lerful treat roonl («.r heart <iuf««<! aim 

dropMjr, irith ihoii breath, nnothartn*, or link- 
Inn -p.' ii.. pftin, much, reuniting, rto. A 

nfns n inr«c number ..| mlrmoulooi 

■iter front Are to tbtrtj phyetotani h»d 

pronounced them Mm arable." J alius K«-i-tr f 

ol I blcaco ulicr ten In,. I UHed. Mr-. Krni.k 
Smith, ol ( 'hloaffo nlicr clirtil leading; i |iy»icltit.« 
hml lulled. 

Send !<.r 1000 Reference! tnBtebope, Clergy- 
men, Mayors, Pmrmenand their wive*, < opy- 
riitliied Examination Blank, pamphleta mid 
Spa la] Individual Treatment Free. Twenty-fiVe 
y<.-Hr-' experience. Pattenta in every Mat* 
Territory. Canndn ami Mexico. Write ftt once. 
Iblng your ease, to Dr. Franklin Hilei KOI 
to 309 State St.. Chicago. I'lcnse mention tins 
paper. 



NcwFnQldlirJ Thc leadin c mi > IceJ In- 

fAMcruvATAoO siiiution of America. 
CONSERVATORY Founded .853 Unsur- 

OF MUSIC passed advantages in com- 

position, vocal and instrumental music, and elocution. 

George IV. Chadvji.k, Musical Director 
Pupils received at any time. For prospectus address 
FRANK W. HALE, General manager. Boston. Mass. 



"A Genuine Old Brandy made from Wine. 

— Medical Press {London), Aug, 1899 

MARTELL'S 
THREE STAR 
BRANDY 

AT ALL RESORTS AND RESTAURANTS 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., san francisco 
Pacific Coast Acents 



provided well on to 60.000 meals. The 
lodging house costs the city of Boston 
about $8,000 per year, and. it is claim- 
ed, saves the city indirectly more than 
$20,000 per year, to say nothing of 
the general good accomplished. — Mu- 
nicipal Journal and Engineer. 



TEACH YOUR CHILDREN TO USE ME— Youth's and Child's Size. 




SOLD ONLY m A YHLLOW BOX— for your protection. Curved handle and face to fit the 
mouth. Bristles In Irregulartufts — cleans between the teeth. Hole in handle and hook to 
hold It. This means much to cleanly persons-theoniy ones who like our brush. Adults" 35c. 
Youths'asc. Children's asc. By mall or at dealers. Sendforfree booklet " Tooth Truths." 
FLORENCE MFQ. CO., IB Pine St., Florence, MftM. 

Prophylactic lootn Brusn 




24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 



Southern Pacific Co.--Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at 8AN FRANOI8CO: 
[Main Line. Foot ol Market Street] 



leave] 



Fbom Januabt 1. 1901 



[ARRIVE 



7 :30 A Benlcla. SulBun. Elmlra. Vacaville, Rumsey. and Sacramento.. 7:45 p 

7:30 A Davis. Woodland, Kniehts Landlne. Marysvllle. OrovUle ,J : ™ P 

7:30 a Atlantic Express, Oeden and East Z : \l P 

8:00a Martinez. San Ramon. Vallejo. Napa, Callstoea. Santa Rosa..... 6:15 p 

8:00 A Niles, Liverniore, Tracy, Lathrop. Stockton 7:15 p 

8 -30 A Shasta Express— Davis. Williams (for Bartlett Sprints), Wil- 
lows. Red Bluff. Portland ™...... 7:45 P 

8:30 A San Jose. Llvermore. Stockton, lone. Sacramento. Placervllle. 

Marysvllle, Chlco, Red Bluff. 4:15 p 

8:30 A Oakdale. Chinese, Sonora. Carters 4:15 P 

9:00 A Haywards, Niles, and way stations " u: * & A 

9:00 a Los Aneeles Express— Martinez. Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced. Fresno, and Los Aneeles ' : j5 P 

9:30 a Valleio. Martinez, and way stations 5:45 p 

l«:00 a The Overland Limited— Oeden. Denver. Omaha. Chicaeo..^.. 6:45 P 
11:00 a Nlles. Stockton. Sacramento, Mendota, Fresno. Haniprd. 

Vlsalla, Portervllle 4:15 p 

11:00 a Llvermore. Saneer. Goshen Junction. Bakersfield. Los 

Aneeles 

|1 :00 p Sacramento River Steamers 

3:00 p Haywards. Nlles. and way stations 

4;00 p Martinez. San Ramon. Vallejo. Napa. Callstofira, Santa Rosa.. ... 
4:00 p Benlcla, Winters. Sacramento, Woodland. Knlpht's Landlne 

Marysvllle. Oroville 

4:30 p Haywards. Niles andSanJose ~ 

5:00 p Niles, Livermore. Stockton. Lodl 

(75:00 p Sunset Limited. El P*so, New Orleans and East ...... 

5:00 p The Owl Limited. Tracy. Fresno. Bakersfield, Saueus lor 

Santa Barbara. Los Aneeles -■■■■ 

5:00 p New Orleans Express— Bakersfield. Santa Barbara, Los An- 

eeles, Demlne. El Paso, New Orleans, and East 

6:00 p Haywards. Nlles, and San Jose 

16:00 p Vallejo 

6:00 p Oriental Mail— Oeden. Cheyenne. Omaha, Chicaeo 

6:00 P Oriental Mail— Oeden. Denver. Omaha, Chicaeo .-.."• 

7:00p Oreeon and California Express, Sacramento, Marysvllle, Red- 
dine. Portland Pueet Sound and East 

8:05 p San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez and way stations 

}8:05p Valleio 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauee). (Foot of Market St.) 



15:00 a 
5:45 p 
9:15 a 

10:45 A 
18:45 A 
10:45 A 
C10:15 A 

10:15 A 

7:45 A 
7:45 A 
11:45 a 
12:15 p 
4:15 p 

8:45 A 

ll:4i A 

7:15 r 



8:15 A Newark. Centerville. San Jose. Felton, Boulder Creek. Santa 

Cruzand way Btations 6:-0 p 

12:15 p Newark. Centerville. San Jose. New Almaden, Felton. Boul- 

der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations eel! A 

4:15p Newark. San Jose. Los Gatos 8:50 A 

09: 3Qp Hunters' Excursion. San Jose, and Way Stations I<:JJP 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— T7:15, 9:00. and 11:00 
A.M. 1:00. 3:00. 5 K». P.M. 
From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.-t6.-00. J8:00. 18.05. 10:00 a. m. 12:00. 

2 :00, 4 : 00. *5:15p. m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauee). (Third and Townsend streets). 



16:10 a Ocean View, South San Francisco .. 76.30 p 

7:00A SanJoseandwaystatlonBlNew Almaden Wednesday only) 1:30 P 

9:00 A San Jose. Tres PinoB. Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove. Paso Robles. 

San Luis Obispo, Surf , Lompoc. and principal waystations 4:10 p 

10:40 A San Jose and way stations 6:35 A 

11:30a San Jose and way stations •■■■ •■•••■■ &:JU p 

T2:45 p San Mateo. Redwood. Menlo Park. Palo Alto. Santa Clara, San 
Jose. Tres Pinos. Santa Cruz. Salinas. Monterey, and Pacific 
Grove '1036 A 

S330p San Jose and Way Stations 7.JU P 
1:15p San Jose and Principal Way Stations - 9:45 a 
5:00 p San Jobc Los Gatos. and Principal Way Stations T9:00 A 

5:30 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations 835 A 

630 p San Jose and Way Stations tkwu a 

011:45 p San Jose and Way Stations > '•*> r 

A for Mornlne. P lor Afternoon. t Sundays excepted. 

1 Sundays only. Q Mondays. Wednesdays. Fridays. 
c Tuesdays. Thursdays. Sundays. a Saturdays only. 



The Paoipio Transfer Company will call for and check baeeaee from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Aeents for Time Cards andother 
Information. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 



ik^ 



Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf, San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports, 11 A. M.: January 1. 6. 11.16. 21, 
26. 31. Feb. 5. change to company's Bteamers at Seattle. 
ForB.C.and Puget Sound Ports. 11 A. M., Jan. 1.6. 11 
16.21.26.31. Feb. 5. and every fllth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p. m.. Jan. 3. 8. 13, 18, 
23. 28. Feb. 2, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at SantaBarbara, Port 
Los Angeles. Redondo, (Los Angeles). "Queen," Wednesdays. 9. a. m., 
Santa Rosa. Sundays, 9 a. m. 

For Santa Cruz. Monterey. San Simeon, Cayucos. Port Harford, San 
Luis Obispo. Gariota. Santa Barbara. Ventura. Hueneme, San Pedro. East 
San Pedro, and Newport (Los Angeles), 'Corona," Fridays. 9 a. m.; 
"Bonitn." Tuesdays, 9 a. m. 
For Mexican ports, 10 a M.. 7th of each month. 
For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice. 
TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
600DALL, PERKINS & CO.. Gen.Agts.. 10 Market St.. San Francisco. 

7:20 A. M. LOCAL FOR FRESNO. BAKERSFIELD 
and intermediate points. 9 A. m California Limited, 
with Sleepers. Dining and Observation Cars to Kansas 
City and Chicago. 450 p.m. Local for Stockton. 8 p.m. 
Overland Express, with Palace and Tourist Sleepers and 
Chair Cars San Francisco to Chicago. 



Santa Fc 
Route 



Chicago in 3 Days 

From San Francisco At 10 a. m 

Chicago, Union Pacific and 

North -Western Line 



Double Drawing-Rooni Sleeping Cars, Buffet, Smoking and Library 
Cars, with barber. Dining Cars — meals a la carte. Daily Tourist 
Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every week from 
San Francisco at p. m. The best of everything. 

K. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617 Market St., Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 



C. A. Murdock & Co., PRINTERS.^** 

No- 532 CLA7 STREET, 8. F. 

California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tiboeon Fkrey— Foot o« Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00, 11:00 a. m; 1235. 3:30. 6:10. 630 p. m. Thursdays— 
Extra trip At 11 :30 p. H. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11 :30 P. m. 
SUNDAYS— 8 KX). 9:30. 11:00 a. m.; 130. 330. 5:00, 6:30 p. M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10.7:50.9:20,11:10 A. m.: 12:15. 3:40, 5:10 p. M. Saturday,) 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 635 p. m. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10. 9:40. 11:10 A. M.;l :40. 3:40, 5:05. 6:25 p. M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 1 In Effect Nov. 7, 1900 1 Arrive In San Francisco 


Week days I Sundays I Destinations I Sundays I "Week days 


7:30 am 
3:30 PM 
5:10 pm 


8:00 AM 
9:30 AM 

5:00 pm 


Novato 

Petal uma 
Santa Rosa 


10:40 am 
6:05 pm 
7:35 PM 


8:40 AM 
10:25 am 
6:22 pm 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8.-00 am 


Fulton. "Windsor. 

Healdsburg. Lytton, 

Geyserville, Cloverdale 


7:35 pm 


10:25 AM 
6:22 PM 


7:30 AM | 8:00 am I Hopland. Ukfah | 7:35 PH | 6:22 pM 


7:30 AM | 8:00 AM | Guer neville | 7:35 PM | "g * M 


7:30 AM 1 8:00 AM 1 Sonoma 1 9:15 am 1 8:40 AM 
5:10 pm 1 5:00 PM 1 Glen Ellen | 6:05 pm | 6:22 pm 


7:30 AM 1 8:00 AM 1 Spbastonol 1 10:40 AM ! 10:25 AM 
3:30 PM I 5:00 PM I Sebastopol | 7;35 PM | 6;22 PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs: at Fulton for Altruria; at Lytton for Lytton Springs: at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springs. Highland Springs. Kelseyville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs; at Uklah, for Vichy Springs. Saratoga Springe, 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter 
Valley. John Day's, Riverside, Lierley's, BucknelPs, Sanhedrin Heights, 
Hullville, Booneville. Philo, Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whitea- 
boro, Albion, Little River, Orr's Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, 
Westport, Usal Wllllts, Laytonvtlle, Cummings, Bell's Springs, Harris, 01- 
Ben's, Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 



H. C. WHITING, Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass, Agent. 



Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FLRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m„ for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

catling at Kobe (Hlogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkon 
with Bteamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Doeic (via Honolulu) Saturday. Feb. 9, 1901 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday, March 7, 1901 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Saturday, March 30, 1901 

Dobic (via Honolulu) Thursday, April 25, 1901 

Round Teip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 

corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 

SS "Mariposa," Saturday. Feb. 2. 2 p. m. 
SS "Australia." to Tahiti, Friday, Feb. 8. 4 p.m. 
SS "Sierra." Wednesday, Feb. 13, at 9 p m. 
Line to Coolgardic, Australia, and Capetown, 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO.. 
Agents. 643 Market Street. Freight office. 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 




January 2*. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



2S 






ASU8SMCNT NOT CC 

ll>CMr Slhtr Viftlna C«*M"T- 
■I *!••• *f bMtMM "^t. I'm.v <w.>. Cat 






An> I i* kmcwnirnt •liwll remain empaM OJI 

HI! v | 

will be delinquent, and advertised for «aUc at public auction, mid unless pay- 
£*"» '- \U:i»M>l».\Y. ihi ITtli day "I 

February. 19"I. to pay the delinquent wwc^ntcnt. together nttli ! 
of advert Wns; and uptiMM ol «*le. By order oltho I lorn. 

P. r i*iri /. Secretary. 

Office— Room 37. third floor Mill* IIuIMIiik. northcu-t corner Hush end 
Montgomery Sta.. Ban Fran rl»co. Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Potosl Mining Company. 

Monde Ixwa- 
Uoaol works Storey Cannty, Nevada. 

■ t*hercl>y siren tluil at I meeting: ol tin- Bos . - In ].| 

nunry, 1901, an aaseasmei 
ikt share «»* levied upon the capital stock of tl >n, payable Im- 

mediately In United States sold coin, to th. Secretary, »t the ofRoe ol the 
company, room 79, Nevn.ii* Muck. DOS Monteomery Street, Bon Francisco. 
ni*. 
Any stock upon which ihi- assuaamenl shall remain unpaid on Hie 
19th DAY OF FEBRUARY. 1901. 
will be delinquent and advertised for wile at public auction, and tmloSS pay 

ment la made before will be **old on THURSDAY, the Uth day of March, 

1901. to nay the<iellnqucnt BMcssraent, together with the cost of advertising] 
and expense* of sale. 

By order of the Board of Director*. 

CHA°. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79. Nevada Block. No- 309 Montgomery streets. San Fran- 
cisco. Cal. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Caribou Oil Mining Company 

Location ol principal place of business— San Francisco. Cal. Location of 
worka— Coaling*, Fresno Oonnly, California. 

Notice la hereby given, that nt a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the tenth day of January, 1901. an assessment (No. 2) of ten <10) ceuts 
per --iiHre was levied upon the capital siock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately In United Statea cold coin to the secretary at the ofllce of the 
v. room I" Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. Snn Francisco. 

California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE 12th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1901. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on TUESDAY, the fifth (5th) 
day of March. 1901. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the 
cost of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

AUG- WATERMAN, Secretary 
Oflie— Room 10. Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Yellow Jacket Gold and Silver Mining Company. 
Location of works. Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada- Principal place of 
business. Gold Hill, Nevada- 
Notice is hereby given that at a meetineof the Board of Directors, held 
on the tenth day of January, 1901, an assessment (No. G) of fifteen cents 
per share was levied upon each and every share of the Capital Stock of 
said Company, payable immediately to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, or to James Newlands, Transfer Secretary, Room 35, Mills 
Building, third floor, San Francisco. California. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on Friday 
THE 15th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 190L 
will be delinquent, and ndvetlised for sale at public auciion; and unless 
payment ip made t efore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 20th day of 
March. 19>* at four o'clock p. m-. In front of the office of the Company, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together wth the costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. 
By order of the Board of Trustees. 

W- H. BLAUVELT, Secretary 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business, San Francisco, California; location 
of works — Virginia Mining District, Storey county. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting: of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 28tb day of December. 1900, an assessment (No. 35) of five cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States gold coin, to the secretary at the office of the com- 
pany, room. 29, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
1st DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1901 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 21st day of Febru- 
ary, 1901 to pay the delinquent assessment, together with tbe cost of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

A. W. HAVENS, Seoretary. 
Ofllce— Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco, Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Occidental Conso Idated Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 36 

Amount per share ■■ 5 cents 

Levied December 28, 1900 

Delinquent in office January 31, 1901 

Day of sale of delinquent stock February 21, 1901 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office: Room 57, Nevada Block, 3o9 Montgomery St., S. F. Cal 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Crean Point Gold ana Stiver Mining Ceaiaant. 

-. held 

■ 

. ■ 

line, nnrih < ai ah «nd 



mla 









cmaln ut<i> ild OO 
\l:Y. 1901. 



will lie d ' 'I ftdvrrtlncd for aalr Hon, mid unl< 

- nude before, will be aotd on im B8D%Y, Ins Will 
I, to pay the delinquent assessment, losethei frith fl 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order ol the Board ol D1 - 

JAMBS NF.Ui iM»s. tfeoratary* 
.'.. third Hoots. Mills Bulldlna. northeast corner of Boab and 
If onlsjunMrv street, B fornts 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould & Curry Sliver Mining Company. 

Aaaeaamcnl 

Amount per share in cent* 

Levied December f, WOO 

Delinquent in office Tuiumry 7. 1901 

Dky Of *»lo of delinquent StOOk Iiinimry 28, 1901 

ALFRED K. DURBROW. Secretary. 
Office— Room 69, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
eiaco. Cal. _____ 

STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING. 

Ophlr Silver Mining Company. 

I'ur-iiiint to the order of the Board of Directors of the Ophir Silver Mining 
Company made at a meeting of said Board, held on the 19th day of 
December, I9OO, notice Is hereby given that a meeting of the Stockholders 
of said < ompany. will be held at the ofhee of said Company, at its office. 
Room No- 5", Nevada Block, No- 3 n 9 Montgomery street, in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of California, on the 

~*— ~? „^__ 28th DAY OF JANUARY. I9OI, 

at the hour of one o'clock p- m- of said day. for the purpose of ratifying or 
refusing to ratify the act of the Board of Directors of sail Company in 
iMinlmsing for said Company those two certain mining claims situate, lying 
and being in the Virginia Mining District, Storey County. - tate of Nevada, 
known as and called the Summit Gold and Silver Quartz Mining Claim and 
the Last Chance Qua tz Mining Claim, for the sum of three thousand 
dollars- 
Dated, San Francisco, January 12, l90l. 

E. B- HOLMES. Secretary of the Ophir Silver Mining Company 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
California Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 
For the six months ending December 31, 1900, dividends have been de- 
clared on deposits in the Savings Department of this Company as follows: 
On Term Deposits, at the rate of three six-tenths (3 6-10) per cent per 
annum, and on Ord nary Deposits at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum, 
free of taxes, and pnyable on »nd after Wednesday. January. 2, 1901. Divi- 
dends uncalled for are added to the principal and bear the same rate of 
dividend as the piincipal from and after January 1, 1901. 

J. DALZELL BROWN, Manager. 
California and Montgomery Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE- 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1900, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, 

payable on and after Wednesday, January 2, 1901. 

GEORGE A. STORY, Cashier. 
33 Post street, San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE- 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held this 
day, a dividend has bee" declared at the rate of three and one-eight (3}_) 
per cent per annum o- 1 all deposits for the six months ending December 31, 
1900. free from all taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1901. 
December 28, 1900, ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

Office — Corner Market, McAllister and Jones Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Savings and Loan Society, 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending December 
31, 1900, at the rate of three and one-fourth (3%) per cent per annum on all 
deposits free of taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1901. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same rate of dividend as the prin- 
cipal from and after January 1, 1901. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office— 101. Montgomery St., cor. Sutter St., Snn Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association. 
For the year ending December 31, 1900. declared a dividend of 5 per cent 
per annum on ordinary deposit sand 6 per cent on term deposits. 

WILLIAM CORBIN, Secretary. 
Office— 222 Sansome St., San Franciseo, Cal. 



GEORGE GOODMAN 



Patentee and Manufacturer of 



Artificial Stone 



(Sohillinger's Patient) in all its branches- Sidewalk and garden walk a 
specialty. 

Office— 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, San Francisco- 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 26, 1901. 



OVERDRESSING SCHOOLGIRLS. 

One evil which no teacher can wholly counteract, but 
which lies almost wholly with the mother, is the overdress- 
ing of school children. One sees the pitiful beginning of it 
even in the kindergarten, where little girls are decked out 
in tawdry, much-betrimmed frocks and hats, with rings, 
bracelets, lockets and all sorts of baubles which are quite 
unfit for children to wear. In these days such attempt at 
decoration sows the seeds of vanity and frivolity, and as 
children grow older all sorts of mischief are bred by over- 
dress. In the prospectus of every well-conducted boarding 
school which looks to the higher life of its pupils one will 
find a plea to mothers to make their girls' wardrobe as plain, 
as comfortable and as sensible as possible. "And please add 
to it the smallest amount of jewelry necessary to' a girl's 
wardrobe" is a line one occasionally sees. The sort of school 
which calls itself fashionable and demands a good wardrobe 
of evening gowns is the school a sensible mother will let 
alone. 

The mother whose social aspirations for her daughters 
lead her to deck them in gay gowns and diamonds, even 
when they are schoolgirls, is not only doing everything in 
her pow-er to make them foolish, selfish women, but she is 
hindering the good work of the school and scattering seeds 
of jealousy and dissension broadcast. In such a home all 
sorts of evils are inculcated. The girl who sees her mother 
bow down to wealth, birth and social position while she 
snubs and scorns poverty is very apt to follow the home 
example and treat her schoolmates as her mother does the 
world. — Good Housekeeping. 



EXERCISE FOR WEAK HEARTS. 

It is not possible to lay down any general rules as to how 
far it is advisable to go in all kinds of sporting exercises 
and other amusements, so that no injury may be done to the 
heart, or as to how much bodily or mental exertion each 
individual is able to support.' One rule, however, is applicable 
in all cases: Whatever the sport may be, in the beginning 
it should be carried on slowly, with but a slight exertion of 
strength, which should then be increased very gradually. 
Should palpitation of the heart set in after any exertion, it 
may be taken for granted that the proper amount of exercise 
has been surpassed. It is also advisable for those who 
devote themselves to any sport that requires unusual effort 
to have their hearts •xammed from time to time by a 
physician. — Dr. J. M. Groedel, in Good Housekeeping. 



There is nothing easier than to live in Fleet street, despite 
the convictions to the contrary. For instance, a journalist 
writes to the Outlook to say that he went into a restaurant 
tor luncheon, and just as his soup was served he put his 
hand in his pocket and found he had no money. He ex- 
plained to the waiter, who politely said: "Never mind, sir; 
pay next time you come." "About 5 o'clock," he continues, 
"still penniless, and still forgetting the fact, I went into a 
tea shop and ordered a cup of tea; then I was suddenly 
struck with horror with what I had done and again explained 
and again got the same reply. It is true that I had visited 
and duly discharged my obligations at both establishments 
before — but that is a detail." 



It jars a man to find, after taking a glass of whisky 

that the skin has been eaten from his throat as though he 
had just swallowed a dose of nitric acid. That is the effect 
which cheap whiskey has upon the gentlemanly drinker, 
but if he sticks to the J. F. Cutter brand he will never feel 
that smarting of the palate, or that unhealthy excitement 
which follows the use of commercial "bug-juice." J. F. 
Cutter whiskey is a gentle, grateful comforter, a stimulant 
but not an intoxicant, a drink for the refined and fastidious. 



THE NICKEL PLATE ROAD (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R.) 

offers East bound passengers three elegantly appointed ves- 
tibuled express trains dally between Cnicago and New York 
and Chicago and Boston. For sleeping car reservations and 
full information address Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast Pas- 
senger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country Tel. Main 1042. 




Deafness Overcome: 

Science has triumphed at last. 

Latest and greatest invention up 
to times. " Invisible Ear-phone." 
Conveys sound directly to nerve of 
hearing. Appliance insetted in eai. 
Vibrating coil acts like telephone 
Reasonabe. Head noises, ear dis- 
charges cured quickly. Wiite for treatise and testi- 
monials free. 

INVISIBLE EAR PHONE CO , 

1230 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hotel Bartholdi, 

THE very center o! the city, convenient to 
all ithe bis: storea and all places of amusement 
European plan, 81 a day and upwards. 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Square Park) 
Finest cafe in this city. 



Milton Roblee. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Wm. B. Hooper, Manager 



A. quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

San Francisco 



RIQQS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C r 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 



of the National Capital. First-class in all appointmenls. O. G. 
8taples, President; G. Devitt, Treasurer. 

American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

Paraiso Hot Springs 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 



Monterey County, Cal. 



C. T. Romie, Proprietor 



J. B. PON. I Pierre Carrere, Founder of Malson Tortoni. I C. Lalannk 

Old Poodle Doq Restaurant 

445 Bush street, cor. Grant Avenue, San Francisco 
Lunch, 60 cts. Dinner, 75 cts. Also, a la carte. 



I. Deutch, Proprietor. 

Crystal Palace 



Telephone, Main 5544 



5 Kearny St., 12 Geary St., S. F. Cal. 

Choice Wines and Liquors. 



Cafe Royal, 




Corner Fourth and Market streets, San Francisco, 
Try our special brew steam and later beer, 5 cents 
Overcoats and viilises checked free. 



ST. LAWRENCE Livery and 
Sales Stable 

423 Post street, between Powell and Mason, 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1323 

W. E. Bridge, proprietor. 




ESTABLISHED JULY 80, 1856. 



News Better 



Annual Subscription, M 00 




Vol. LXII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 2, 1901. 



Number 5. 



Printed and puMUhca every Saturday bj the proprietor, 

MAR RIOTT. Hi Kaarny atraat. Ban Franctooo. I'mcred alSaa Ki»n- 

d**» I', -l.-flk-e afl second-claa* matter. 
The-ll . NBWS l.KTTEKIn London., F.nl-. id at :!" r.,rnlilll 

. RcpraaentaUva* . 

Information may he "htAlncd iceanlin^ BlltaWrlpUona aud ftdvcTlldtnff 
rale*. Pari* France— Ofllec. >> ■ 

All aortal itcma. announcement*. ailverll«lnc or othar mailer. Intended lor 
publication In the current number c.l lha RRWS LETTER, ah ould bn 

• cut to Ihi* utllcc not later than f> i> tu. Tlnir»iliiy. 

If you do not believe that God is good to the Irish, read 
how Rear Admiral William A. Casey will supplant Admiral 
Kautz as commander of the Pacific Squadron. 



If Kruger comes to America in promises only, as indica- 
tions point, there will be little advantage lost and consider- 
able embarrassment saved on both sides. 



Aguinaldo has discovered a striking likeness between him- 
self and General Washington. After this. Uncle Sam cannot, 
in good grace, refuse to hand him over the Philippines. 



That the Duke of Manchester refused to pay $7.50 for a 
ride from the ferry to the Palace Hotel may illustrate to 
certain local cabbies that the word "duke" does not spell 
"dupe." 



"But we have no pictures of Chief Sullivan," complains 
the newspaper artist. "Haven't we?" enquires the Sunday 
editor. "What's the matter with our portraits of Admiral 
Dewey?" 



To those French newspapers who sought to villify the 
character of Queen Victoria at the time of her death, the 
News Letter replies that theirs is a passing poor revenge 
for Waterloo, after all. 



Julian Tregenna Biddulph Arnold has just received a 
ten-years' sentence for embezzlement, or what not, at Old 
Bailey, London. So you see, Sir Edwin's son had much rea- 
son on his side when he preferred San Francisco as a place 
of residence. 



The News Letter predicts that certain quiet citizens of 
San Francisco will have considerable to be thankful for 
on next Thanksgiving Day, since the joint athletic board 
of Berkeley and Stanford have agreed to hold the inter- 
collegiate football game earlier in November. 



H. J. Marr, former membership secretary of the Sioux City 
Y. M. C. A., is now running one of the most prosperous and 
extensive gambling houses in Los Angeles. And this shows 
that membership in the Christian Association does not tend 
to dull the enterprise, of a horn business man. 



A new terror has been added to the Presidential office. Mc- 
Kinley has been constituted sole taster of army rations; 
he alone is empowered to decide upon the proper foods for 
our boys in blue. We may he pretty sure that there will be 
no more embalmed beef scandals. 

President McKinley, upon submitting the report of the 
Philippine Commission to our national legislative body ex- 
pressed the opinion that it was time for some sort of civil 
law to govern the islands. This is a move in the right direc- 
tion, for up to date the Filipino has never been given a 
chance to apply the word "civil" to any act the American 
soldier or statesman has committed on his Island. 



William E. Stokes, the New York millionaire. Is erecting 
Hi- largest hotel in the world. This structure the owner 
Intends to leave as bis monument There are many heirs 
who wish the tombs oi their ancestors would return 
them B monthly rental as substantial as Mr. Stokes' "monu- 
ment." 



The stock in foreign noblemen has taken a decided slump 
of late, and Boni de Castellane, who has done the most 
to queer the market, is the first to suffer. The Gould trus- 
tees have cut him down one-half, leaving him the consola- 
tion that he is still receiving some 200,000 times what he is 
worth. 



The State Legislators who are looking over the books 
of one Waldron, late of San Quentin Prison, declare their 
disgust for business methods at that institution by roundly 
scoring its managers. This is the least they can do. When 
a thief makes a steady living by systematically robbing a 
prison, he furnishes remarkably good material for a comic 
opera librettist, but an equally bad example to the body poli- 
tic. 



Packer, the cannibal who several years ago shot and ate 
a half-dozen of his companions, while starving in the Rocky 
Mountains, has just been released from Canon City Peniten- 
tiary by the Governor of Colorado. Packer has been spend- 
ing his latter years in jail paying for what may be known as 
one of the most expensive meals on record. 



In Evansville, Indiana, they are solving the negro prob- 
lem by putting the black vagrants who infest the town to 
work on the public rock-pile. This method may be an ap- 
proach to the old institution of slavery, but the negro prob- 
lem is a serious one, and slavery, with all its evils, was not 
the worst method for keeping down the terrors of the South. 



There is no reason why Pope Leo XIII., a just and good 
potentate, should queer himself at the sunset of his career 
by bursting into meter about the twentieth century and its 
purposes. Leo is a much better Pope than poet, and even an 
Andrew Lang as English translator cannot make the lines 
penned by His Holiness worth the space they occupy. 



With the Snake and Creek Indians still rising unsubjugated 
m our interior prairies, burning where they will and thumb- 
ing their noses right playfully at our Government forts, 
it seems almost dignified to the proportions of a joke that 
we should be sending armies thousands of miles across the 
waters to discipline the untameable gu-gu. 



If Mr. Tesla does not now effect a telegraphic communica- 
tion with Mars, he will know the reason why, for William 
A. Eddy of New Jersey is helping for all he is worth with his 
famous new seven-foot electric kite. Of course the cavor- 
tions of Tesla & Co. cannot do any possible good, but, then, 
they do no harm, and it is amusing to guess what they will 
be doing next. 



There is something almost pathetic in the naivete with 
which, foreign and heathen gentlemen criticise the customs 
and religion of our country. Listen, for instance, to the 
words of Minister Wu Ting Fang, who says that he does 
not believe all Christians at all times live up to every tenet 
of their faith. As Mr. Wu has been a close observer of late 
events across the water, he deserves a place, for that one 
remark, among the satirists of the world. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 



THE FUTURE OF KING AND KAISER. 

Edward VII and Wilhelm HI have been brought together 
by grief as deep and as heartfelt as ever stirred the hearts 
of men. The one declared it to be his life's purpose to fol- 
low "in the footsteps of his mother." The other could not 
with propriety, considering the time and place, have said 
the same thing, but the impulse which moved the King must 
have been felt with at least equal potency by the Kaiser. 
The latter, when a mere baby, was taught at his own 
mother's knee, to lisp the prayer, "God save the Queen." 
Edward VII had a living mother, but Wilhelm had more. 
He had a mother and a grandmother, the exact counterpart 
of each other. He had even more. For a father, he had had 
the good and wise Frederick, who idolized his mother-in- 
law, and followed as closely "in her footsteps" as if he had 
been her own son. Nobody ever gave Queen Victoria a half- 
hearted affection, and certainly Emperor Frederick Wilhelm 
did not. Then the Princess Victoria, afterwards the Empress 
B'rederick, and mother of the present Kaiser, was the 
Queen's first-born, the apple of her eye, and the object ot 
her most tender solicitude. What the influence of such a 
mother and father has heen in the upbuilding and education 
of their son may he more easily imagined than described. 
What its effect upon the love of the Emperor for his grand- 
mother has heen has just been demonstrated before the 
world. Leaving the cares of State, the governance of his 
country, and even the prior claims to attention which the 
serious illness of his own mother called for, he hastened to 
Cowes, arriving in time to exchange greetings with the 
parting Queen, to give her his promise that, if he could help 
it, England and Germany should never engage in war on 
the opposite sides, and then to receive her parting blessing. 
Headstrong and erratic as he may be, he has a great big 
heart, and it is sure that the blessing will follow him to the 
end, and that he will lead rather than follow the more 
easy-going Edward VII in that unity of Anglo-Saxon and Teu- 
ton races that is the best promise the world affords of an 
advancing civilization. 

Then, again, Empress Frederick is not dead yet, although 
she lies a very sick woman. We cannot think but that when 
she gets over the shock of her mother's death, she will re- 
cover. The worst is certainly not at present feared, or the 
whole of the reigning family of Germany would hasten to 
her bedside. When she is herself again she will be a cement- 
ing power between the courts of her native and adopted 
countries. The sister of the King, and the mother of the Kai- 
ser, she is never going to let them get very far apart. It 
has been too much the fashion in late years to say that there 
is no relationship in statescraft. Then blood is not thicker 
than water, and such heart to heart scenes as Cowes has just 
witnessed are as evanescent as a summer's cloud, and the 
prayers of childhood at a mother's knee have come to be 
as fleeting as a midsummer night's dream. The Empress 
Frederick, possessing much of the tact and common sense 
of her mother, is, perhaps a more masterful personality. 
She put her husband on the throne, despite his cancer and 
Bismarck. Under the law of Germany, if the heir apparent 
be afflicted with an incurable disease he cannot ascend the 
throne. The Empress knew before anybody else that Fred- 
erick was seized with an incurahle malady that must end 
his life in a few months. She removed him from the prying 
eyes of Berlin, dismissed Virchow and the rest of the Ger- 
man professors, sent to London for the famous expert, 
McKenzie, took him, with the acquiescence of her husband, 
into her confidence. They together so nursed him that his 
color came again, and he looked so much better that the 
German doctors were silent, Frederick was crowned, and 
Victoria became the Empress of Germany, to the great cha- 
grin of Bismarck. "That English woman," as he had once 
sneeringly called her, had beaten the iron chancellor for 
the first time in his life. But a still greater triumph awaited 
her. Bismarck at once hegan an intrigue to estrange the 
Emperor from his mother, and for a time it looked as if he 
would succeed. But it only looked so. The Emperor was 
waiting for the occasion, and when it arrived the Chancellor 
fell with a dull thud. He retired to his estates, and ended 
his days nursing a sore head. "That English woman" still 
survives him. Yet it may well be believed that her work is 
done. The royal house of Germany and England are one. 
Their friendly arrangement as to China is In full force, and 
more will appear further on. 



OUR PENAL COLONY AT GUAM. 

The United States now owns a penal colony and its 
name is Guam. Less than three years ago the press of this 
country, with a noble rage denounced Spain for her policy 
of deporting Cuban leaders. They were taken to Ceuta In 
Africa, and we called shame upon a cowardly and tyranni- 
cal Government that dared not leave a man, even in a 
Cuban prison, to infect the air with brave words about lib- 
erty and independence. Strikingly strange is it that we 
have lived to adopt the very policy we then so strenuously 
denounced. Yet even in this sincere flattery of the "But- 
cher" Weyler we are now indulging. General McArthur is 
deporting all the influential but non-combatant Filipinos to 
Guam. That grand old patriot, Mabini, whom Senator Hoar 
likened to Washington, is partially paralyzed and in feeble 
health, but because he will not advise his compatriots as 
our Government would have them advised, off he goes. He 
is the most learned man in all the Philippines, occupied the 
h-ghest judicial offices under the Spanish regime, and is 
credited with being the author of many very able documents 
which Aguinaldo has issued from time to time. Bowed 
down with years and bodily infirmities, his intellect is still 
as bright and vigorous as it ever was. His latest production 
was the petition of all the Filipinos of wealth and education 
on Luzon, which was presented to the Senate by Senator 
Frye. Great opposition has been made to its being printed, 
and so far tne imperialistic press has declined to touch it. 
Certain of the independent papers, such as the Springfield 
Republican and New York Nation have succeeded in procur- 
ing copies, and now a document that will live in history 
is being read pretty extensively. Meanwhile, Mabini is 
expatriated from bis home and family, and the books he 
loves so well, and all because he loves freedom and is able 
to express thoughts that breathe in words that burn. 



THE HORSE AND THE MAN. 

California, young as it is, has assumed an enviable place 
among the great horse-breeding sections not only of this 
country, but of the entire world. Californian thoroughbreds 
have made the name of their native State famous on both 
sides of the Atlantic, and yet to-day it is altogether possible 
— nay, rather, it is probable, that the sport of racing will 
be so dragged through the mire and clay, that it will be legis- 
lated eventually out of existence. 

The race-course is to horse-flesh what the arena of public 
and business life is to mankind. The old Spartan theory 
of the survival of the fittest may be inhumane, but "great is 
truth, and will prevail." And in the concourses of men who 
would wish to see the sluggard, the coward and the effemi- 
nate win the laurels of fame or wealth from the stalwart and 
brave? So on the race-course. Deplore the indispensable 
concomitant of racing as we may, betting, gambling if you 
please, and yet the race-course will always remain the sole 
and indispensable adjunct of the breeder of horses, whether 
runners or that true American product, the light harness 
horse. 

In such a virile young community as this, there is no sense 
or reason in the deprecation of a sport that appeals to the 
most enlightened and refined minds of other countries. 
Presidents, prime ministers, and chief justices, men whose 
every selfish prompting would bid them beware of contam- 
inating themselves in the public eye, have raced horses, and 
no harm has been thought of them for the indulgence. Why, 
then, should so clamorous an outcry be directed at the sport 
here in San Francisco? 

One man is the reason, and one alone — Thomas H. Wil- 
liams, President of the California Jockey Club. A hard thing 
to say, perhaps, and one that many men will not believe in 
all sincerity at the present time. 

"The king can do no wrong," and king of the California 
turf interested persons have proclaimed "Tom" Williams 
to be. Because to him, a brainless son of a brainy parent, 
there came the inspiration that racing could be a pleasing and 
paying speculation in this State, he is to be given a monopoly 
of the business. Nor is the result that he has been aiming 
at tirelessly to be accomplished by fair and sportsmanlike 
means, but that makes no difference. The subornation of 
legislators, politicians and newspapermen is but a means 
to the end. All roads look alike to the uncrowned king of 



Ftbmsry 1, 1901. 



8AN FRVNCI8CO NEWS LETTER. 



Emeryville, tho township ho had created for hi* purpoaea, 
so long as ho can drive opposition out of i 

All present Indications point to 1 , that Tom 

Williams has gono too far In his ruthless warfare asslnut 
the CrockerSpreckols-FalrPonlntowskl comblnal 
Interested In Tnnforan and the closed Ingleslde ti 
are countless millions, and better still, plentj 
behind this coterie. Williams, by violating 
that he had tacitly. If not actually, made in arranging I 
Hon of dates between Oakland and Tanforan. and procuring 
n rate adverse to the latter track In the Board Of Bap 
of San Mateo County, has forfeited all claim to oonstdei 
If "rule or ruin" bo his motto, he is likely to taste ruin, so 
far as his racing interests are concerned, before ha Is 
through with his present expert 

Public opinion will not stand for an eternal repetition of 
the wars of revenge that Williams lias waged on I he- 
have stood in the way of his turf projects. Our public wants 
racing, but does not want It badly enough to submit to the 
autocracy of any single individual. Oakland's favor Is al- 
ready on the wane, and unless the "Master of Oakland" 
can be induced to see sense before long, Oakland will be 
only one of the many tracks closed by popular disfavor. 

A SAINT IN A CELLAR. 

Ritualism may be described as that form of religion 
which borrows its appeal from the theatre and has its motive 
power in spectacle. In that view the theatrical pose as- 
sumed by the Reverend Herbert Parrish at the recent Epis- 
copal Convention, was wholly in character for a parson in 
petticoats engaged in the ecclesiastical-man-millinery busi- 
ness. Mr. Parrish, we are told, made an "impassioned" ap : 
peal to the house of bishops, deans, archdeacons, and minor 
canons, all about Number 14, as he pretended, but in fact to 
exhibit himself in the pose of a saint in a cellar who would 
rather go begging from door to door than give up the noble 
work for humanity that he has undertaken. 

So far as could be gathered from the words of this passion- 
ate pilgrim, inspired by Number 14, the noble work on which 
he is engaged is chiefly the discharge of the mortgage on a 
superfluous church building which might better be sold for 
the debt and converted to something useful. The "cellar" 
in which the reverend hermit resides is a comfortable apart- 
ment, and as for his need to beg, why, then, the ecclesias- 
tical ravens — who in this instance have taken the appro- 
priate shape of a plague of women — will bring him food. 

When the Comedie Francaise was re-opened in Paris 
the other day, it was announced that the statue of Voltaire 
had been put on castors so that it could conveniently be 
slid out before the footlights or even rolled out of doors in 
case of another fire. Now, it seems that the plague of women 
who feed the vanity of Father Parrish might borrow one 
more idea from the theatre, and putting their little tin god 
on wheels, might roll him down Market street by way of 
a spectacle of Lazarus pointing with pride to his sores. 
Opportunities to grow impassioned over Number 14 do not 
come every day, and it is clear that Mr. Parrish was in- 
tended by nature for a Continuous Performance. 



MR. BRYAN AS AN EDITOR. 
Mr. Bryan might have been President had he not been 
a crank, but that seems to be no bar to his becoming an 
editor as times go. At any rate the first number of his new 
weekly, called the Commoner, has made its appearance, 
but has not set the country ablaze. In fact, it has fallen 
flat. It was possible from the hour of its birth to pretty 
safely predict its early demise. There is simply nothing in 
it, except that it is edited by a twice-defeated Presidential 
candidate to attract and hold the attention of anybody. 
As a matter of mere curiosity, one naturally turns to Mr. 
Bryan's inaugural to see what he has to say for himself. 
There, if anywhere, we may expect to get the measure of the 
man's personality as a writer. He says the name of the 
paper has been selected because "it will endeavor to aid the 
common people in the protection of their rights, the ad- 
vancement of their interests, and the realization of their 
aspirations." That sentence delivered orally by a speaker 
of Mr. Bryan's resounding voice and fine physique, 
would no doubt elicit a cheer from an average audience, 
but to an ear attuned to writing with a meaning in It, it 



.'trap, n piling on of tho agony, and 
dem.i '.hen a real writer tal i 

It Is only I- i for the Dumbei he can 

'her, and not for the quality Of thought ho can 

> man Is played out on the stum; 
- to the editorial chair, hut ho rarely ,,r | 
-Is In It. He has fallen Into the bad habit of 

tail words, with repetitions that convey an Impression, but 

»h"n critically examined, are found to be without 
meaning. The worst service that can be done to inch words 
Is to put them Into cold type. Their hollowness Is i 

There is no commonality In this country, 
where all alike are peers and equals before the laws. The 
• hild born In a log cabin and raised by humble parents, 
stands an equal chance with every other child born In the 
country to become one day President of the United States. 
Where this state of things exists, it is positively mischievous 
to attempt to array class against class, to educate the least 
lata! into the belief that the most successful are their 
natural enemies, and that "an equalization of all things," 
ns a worthy follower of Bryan expressed it at the last elec- 
tion, "Is sure to come about in due time." It is better, how- 
ever, that these things should be ventilated in print than 
that they should remain unanswered when spouted by the 
orators to cow country audiences. If Mr. Bryan will keep 
up his new venture, his sting will soon be drawn, if it is 
not already. As soon as his paper gives signs of collapsing, 
people not of its way of thinking might do a worse thing 
than pay it a subsidy to continue. The payment, however, 
should be in honest dollars. 



THE LEGISLATURE MAKING NO PROGRESS. 
The Legislative session is half over and no progress has 
been made. An inordinately large staff of attaches are 
drawing their per diem, and yet absolutely nothing is being 
done. It is true that nearly a thousand bills have been intro- 
duced, but none of them are being pushed. The most of 
them are old bills revamped for the purpose, no doubt, of 
trying if there is any money in them. From this general 
inertness we surmise the fact to be that few persons want 
to buy legislation this year, and that no jobs are ripe for 
being put through. Of course at the last moment there will 
be more of a rush. If even at this late day the Legislature 
would undertake to give the various Boards and Commis- 
sions a thorough overhauling, abolish one-half of them, and 
reduce the others to economical dimensions, a great saving 
to the State would be effected, and the public service im- 
proved. For the most part these Boards and Commissions 
are mere make-believes. They toil not, neither do they 
spin. They meet but seldom, and then only to do nothing. 
Their secretaries are principally engaged in compiling 
voluminous reports which go to the State Printer to be 
printed, and to cost the State a large sum. They are then 
hauled to the back rooms of the Secretary of State's office, 
where they are neither opened or read by anybody. In due 
time their room is needed, and they are taken to the furnace 
and burned, just as the books at San Quentin were. If we 
must spend money a less audacious way of doing it might 
easily be found. There would be more enjoyment in sending 
the Commissioners to Paris to have "a bully good time." 
If bureaus were established at Sacramento, just as they are 
at Washington, over which the Governor, as Chief Executive, 
should have supreme control, the very few departments that 
would be necessary could hardly fail to give us a better 
and cheaper State administration than we now have. The 
great trouble is that none of our present Boards or Commis- 
sions are supervised by anybody, or held to any sort of ac- 
countability for their performance of duty. Too many of 
them are politicians, who accept their offices as rewards for 
services rendered, and expect to do little but keep the ma- 
chine well oiled and in good running order. The Legisla- 
ture's useless junketing trips are taking up too much time. 
Members should get down to business. 



The papers are making no end of a row about John Bell, 
the Honolulu leper who walked into the office of the Board 
of Health and requested that he be sent to the receiving hos- 
pital. What would the papers have? Mr. Bell, by con- 
fronting the Health Board behaved like an excellently 
groomed leper who understood the situation and his place 
in the world. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 



THE POPULAR VOTE FOR THE PRESIDENTIAL 

CANDIDATES. 

The popular vote for President, cast three months since, 
is only now an accurately known quantity. The totals are 
now officially announced in every State in the union. One 
of the most remarkable features in them is that the vote of 
1900 did not perceptibly increase over that of 1896. In the 
former year there were 13,923,378 votes polled, whereas in 
1900 the total was 13.966,770 votes, or an increase of but 
44,399. The census statistics show that during the four 
years, the aggregate electorate had increased by 1,000,000 
votes. The question then arises as to what became of 
them. The New Orleans Picayune supplies an answer that 
is perhaps as good as any that has been given. It says: 
'There was a most decided indifference to both candidates, 
or, what is more to the purpose, a most formidable re- 
pugnance to both. Among these non-voters were the anti- 
imperialists. Republicans, who would not vote against their 
party even if they could not vote with it, and the Democrats 
who were afraid of Mr. Bryan's silver heresy. Then there 
was a great body of citizens who saw too much socialism 
in Bryanism, and too much imperialism in McKinleyism, 
to be able to choose between them, and thus it came that 
one million votes were withheld from the polls." These 
objections are in line with those urged against the respective 
candidates during the campaign, and are as likely to be cor- 
rect as any that can be given. The Philadelphia Ledger 
(Rep.) adds that "there is a reserve vote in the country 
that is strong enough to turn the Government over to the 
Democrats, but Mr. Bryan was not the leader to call it out." 
The gross figures show that Mr. Bryan gained strength in 
fourteen States and lost in the other thirty-one. Mr. Mc- 
Kinley gained in twenty-four States and lost in twenty-one. 
Singular to say, Mr. Bryan's heaviest gains were in the Re- 
publican States of the East. In the New England States 
alone he gained 170,000. In New Jersey 30,000, and in New 
York over 125,000. In Illinois, too. he gained 40,000. But in 
Utah and Colorado there was a practical revolution. A 
Bryanite majority of 51,116 in Utah was turned into a Mc- 
Kinley majority of 2,860, and in Colorado Mr. Bryan lost 36,- 
000. On the Pacific Coast (California, Oregon and Washing- 
ton) a Bryan majority of seven thousand was transformed in- 
to a majority for McKinley of 65,000. Bryan's own State of 
Nebraska reversed its previous decision, and gave McKinley 
a majority of 7,820. These figures show that the Presidency 
is never a certainty until the figures are all counted. Many 
of the results attained falsified the prophets. Fifteen mil- 
lions of voters are a large floating mass that is liable at the 
last moment to get a list to either side, by the first breeze 
that arises. 



THE TRANSPORT RING. 



There are signs that a storm will shortly break over 
the heads of the transport officials. The scandalous favor- 
itism shown in chartering steamers for the Government 
has long been apparent. Ever since the outbreak of the 
Philippine rebellion created such an unprecedented demand 
for steamers, the transport service has been a veritable 
Cape Nome and Klondike rolled into one for a favored few. 
When bids for vessels were called, it always happened, by 
singular coincidence, that the offers sent in by certain firms 
were accepted, while all others were rejected. Outside 
owners or brokers would be told that no more ships were 
required, while next day, or perhaps nest week, several 
steamers offereu by the ring would be accepted. The worst 
example of the kind is probably the case of the well-known 
Seattle broker, whose wife, by a lucky chance, is related 
to the family of Quartermaster Bird. This gentleman has 
got more transports into the Government service, has kept 
them longer, and has secured higher rates of freight, than 
any other member of the ring. At present he has no less' 
than twenty-eight steamers in the transport service, and the 
commissions he has earned must amount to a very decent 
fortune. Nor has San Francisco done so badly either. One 
prominent firm here, not content with the legitimate broker- 
age, hit upon the ingenious plan of rechartering steamers. 
Knowing that it could always rely upon a Government 
engagement, it secured all the steamers it could at moderate 
rates of freight, and afterwards turned them over to the 



transport fleet at an enormously advanced price. The thing 
was done quite openly, and the practice was so well under- 
stood in shipping circles that if an outsider wished to charter 
his ship, he knew that his only chance was to nand the 
business over to this firm. The game was profitable to both, 
and no one interested was likely to make an expose, so that 
things might have gone on working as smoothly in the fu- 
ture as they have done in the past, had not the ring trod 
on the toes of the Portland people. The Oregon ship- 
owners — and they are a good fighting lot — are up in arms 
because their bids have been persistently rejected at Wash- 
ington, while higher offers from other sources have been 
accepted. They give figures in support of their assertions, 
and promise to make things warm for Quartermaster Bird, 
and all the other officials concerned. We wish them success, 
for nothing but good can come of such an investigation. 
If it only checks this scandalous waste of public money, 
that will be something gained; for a drastic cure we must 
go deeper, and following the course long since advocated 
by the News Letter: transfer the control of the transport 
service from the army to the navy. 



THE COMING OF THE RUMMAGE SALE. 

The rummage sale for the purposes of charity is a new 
lad in the East. In many of the towns of New England and 
New York it has broken out in the form of almost an epi- 
demic. As most fads reach San Francisco sooner or later, 
it will not be amiss to learn somewhat of this newest thing 
out. The various stages of a rummage sale run about like 
this: People go through closets, trunks, and attics, too, if 
they have attics, and bring forth all sorts of old things, 
which they are willing to part with for the benefit of the 
poor. There is a pause, and then a rummage sale breaks out 
in some vacant store room, the poor are invited, and come 
in and buy up all the old things, and the money is used for 
the benefit of the poorer-poor of the locality. It seems a harm- 
less and even a useful way of benefiting all parties con- 
cerned. It is good, once in a while, to have a clearing out 
of old things, even though some ornamental and more or less 
useful things go along. Then the money is used to put bread 
in some hungry people's mouths. The danger of rummage 
sales is said to consist in their fascination: it seizes whole 
parishes as if with the grip. It induces mothers of families 
to turn over for rummage purposes articles that they and 
theirs long for in vain afterwards. It makes the poor rum- 
mage day after day among things they did not know they 
wanted until they saw them; it pursues them with the lure 
of bargains beyond their dreams, until they return home 
laden with once fashionable hats, biscuit cutters that have 
lost their cutting propensities, false hair and even teeth, 
broken harps and banjoes, and old strings. Old women 
pick up things that were used in the families in which they 
were once servants, and tell stories about them ever after- 
wards. When a community is once thoroughly under the 
spell of rummage it is ridden as completely as if taken by 
a popular song. There is a great deal of fun, some health- 
ful exercise and excitement, a very desirable "clearing out," 
and above all much beneficent charity in it. San Francis- 
cans can, we think, be depended upon to "catch on" to it one 
of these days. 



Extortion has not struck the Coast in the form of kid- 
naping, but has gone right down to bed-rock, as in the case 
of T. S. Lippy, the Klondike king of Seattle, who has just 
leceived a letter threatening many varieties of torture 
unless he "pungles" to the extent of $125,000. The criminals 
who are operating Mr. Lippy are wise in their policy, for 
well they know the Klondike millionaire, as a class, is the 
easiest thing that ever hit the pike. 



Emperor William of Germany hardly finds the day long 
enough to wear all his new clothes. When he goes ashore 
he must attire himself as a Field Marshal in the British 
army; when he returns to his yacht he must dress as a Brit- 
ish Admiral. And when he goes back to his native Germany 
he must wear about 1500 other uniforms. To be a royal 
tailor-block is no sinecure, and the salary is well-earned. 



—After twenty-four years under the Palace Hotel. Marsh's Jap- 
anese Fine Art Store has moved to 214 Post street. 



Ftbruary 2. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



TWO GLIMPSES of THE QUEEN 

By J. F. Rose-Soley. 
■ a somewhat remarkable fact that, out (if the many 
million!! of the lata Qoeaa'i subjects, such ■ re j small 

sonally. Durli 
half of her rclsn. she lived In almost COtnp 

is a whole had only n chanca to sr.' bar o i 
n of some great State ceremonial, and then 
• ting glimpse of an old woman driving past In 
nage. There are many who, from a national point ol 
have questioned the Queen '8 wisdom in deriding to live the 
life of a r — " ill. perhaps, it was all for the best, 

a great deal of the mysterious reverence and love 
which the Queen inspired amongst her people was dui 
spect for the sanctity of her grief. The heart of every widow, 
nay. every wife, in the land, went out to her. The widow. 
out of the fullness of her own knowledge, could sympathize 
with the woman who at a comparatively early stage of mar- 
ried life, had lost her dearest and best; the wife's eyes mois- 
tened with the thought that possibly her turn might come 
ueit. And thus It came about that the personality of Vic- 
toria was but little known to the mass of her subjects. 
The Highland rotters around Balmoral were "weel a quaint" 
with their gracious lady, and many are the stories told about 
the Queen's womanly visits to humble cottage homes. The 
keepers of Windsor Park, the school-boys at Eton, the towns- 
people of that lovely Royal town on the Thames, knew her 
well; at Cowes, the picturesque center of yachting on the 
Isle of Wight, her appearance was so familiar as to excite 
hardly any comment. But outside these three royal resi- 
liences the Queen was scarcely known to her people. She 
rarely came to London, where, by rights, the Sovereign 
of the United Kingdom should spend most of his or her time. 
She disliked for some unexplained reason, Buckingham 
Palace as a residence, and now the good people of the city 
are praying that King Edward will reverse this practice, and 
restore the Metropolitan Court to its former brilliancy. 

In spite of these drawbacks it has been my privilege to 
meet the Queen face to face on several occasions. The most 
memorable of these events which I can recall was the great 
volunteer review held in Windsor Park early in the eighties. 
It was the biggest gathering of armed men which had ever 
taken place on British soil, and I believe, in spite of all 
the wars which have followed, that it still holds the record. 
True, they were only volunteers, but they were fine, upstand- 
ing, well-trained men for all that, the backbone of the Em- 
pire, men of the types who have recently shown themselves 
ready and willing to fight for their native land. 

Special trains had been speeding from all parts of the 
Kingdom during the night, and a broiling August morning 
saw us gathered together under the spreading oaks of the 
lovely Windsor Park. Even in the temperate clime of Eng- 
land it can be hot sometimes, and on this particular morning, 
I can remember, it was so torrid that huge blocks of ice were 
scattered all over the grounds. Englishmen, as a rule, are 
rot much given to the use of ice, and this concession to the 
comfort of the troops was quite an extraordinary one. By 
a curious combination of circumstances, it fell to my lot to 
be one of the first to march past the Queen on that review. 
I was then but an humble Lieutenant in the Royal Nayal 
Artillery Volunteers, a force which corresponds to the State 
Naval Brigade. We were, of course, in the regular Jack Tar 
costume, and very proud we were of it, too, for it gave us 
precedence over all the other troops in the land. 

In England, the navy, as the oldest arm of the service, 
ranks before the military. Thus when the two branches 
c£ the force maneuver together on land, the men of the sea 
always insist on going first. So it happened that we took the 
right even of the Honorable Artillery Company, the oldest 
regiment in Great Britain, which dates its charter way 
back to the days of Henry VIII. 

As I marched past on the right of my company, within a 
few feet of the Royal carriage, and gave the regulation sa- 
lute, I cannot say that the appearance of Her Majesty im- 
pressed me much. Just a dumpy little old woman — plainly 
dressed in black, seated in a great carriage, and quite over- 
shadowed by the brilliancy of her entourage. Around her 
were Princes and Generals, men of high degree, all clad in 
the most gorgeous of uniforms, but the Queen sat there, 
a plain little old woman in black, and smiled kindly, if some- 



*h»t wp«rily at her Midlers n« they filed by. It wan that 

Which, I think. 

<> fin 

id the 

... Afterwards, « ban the Qs 

•f the various regiments a) the P 

bar again for a moment, but 1 need hardly add that 

etiquette gars us no opportunity (ot conversation, 

Another occasion on which i saw the Queen to even fl 

was whan she opened the New La* Courts on the 

London. With a persistency which only such n cause 

could justify. I managed to secure and keep a place on the 

curb stone of the narrow street, until the procession passed 

' 'illy those who know what 8 London crowd is like 
will realize the difficult; of BUI h a task. The mob behind 
kepi pushing mo forward, while at intervals a Grenadier 

Guardsman would jab me In the stomach with the butt of 
his rifle. At other times a heavy dragoon would calmly en- 
deavor to walk the hind quarters of his well-trained steed 
all over me. But I stuck to my post, and was rewarded by see- 
ing the Queen drive past quite close. She looked, if any 
thing, a trifle more pale and weary than at the review, but 
she still responded with the same gracious smile to the 
huzzas of the crowd. That was long before the jubilee days 
and the wave of imperialism which has lately broken over 
the British Isles. Still, there was no mistaking the genuine 
enthusiasm and delight of the people at once more behold- 
ing their Queen in person. The packed Strand rang from 
end to end with the loudest cheers, flags waved from every 
window, and the path of the Queen was carpeted by (he flow- 
ers which were cast before her carriage. And since then, 
on every public occasion, it has always been the same story, 
for surely no monarch was ever more beloved of her sub- 
jects than Victoria. 



To Cure a Cold in One Day 



Take Laxative Bromo-Qulnlne Tablets. All druggists refund 
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Importers • MACON DRAY & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February i., 1S01. 




Tka^urQs 



Wand 



GJedttrnowand but Pttabure's . " 

— Tom Moor*. =™ 




The critics are fighting (as usual) over a production. My 
colleagues are never so amusing as when they disagree. 
It pleases me to read them as they squabble. Indeed, they 
are very amusing. I hope I give them a halt of the fun they 
give me. One would seem to think that Shakespeare's "A 
Midsummer Night's Dream" is a farce, another that it is 
a poetic comedy, another that it is a dark-browed tragedy. 
Wouldn't it make you snigger! Now, William Shakespeare 
was a practical actor (not a very good actor, though, I am 
told) a practical stage-manager, and a practical dramatist. 
He made what was reckoned as good money in Elizabethan 
days — not of course the rich royalties that a Belasco or a 
Broadhurst would deal in to-day, but a very decent income 
for the time in which an actor was regarded as a vagabond, 
and a playwriter as something barely better than a tailor. 
Yes, indeed, quite a good play, even though a classic, is "A 
Midsummer Night's Dream," but not as my fellow laborers 
would argue, a farce, or a comedy, or a tragedy. By all the 
swords, guns, and cannons of dramatic art it is a fantasy, 
obese with quip and whim and droll sparkle. William 
Shakespeare, as I have said, was a practical workman. You 
will not find in all English literature a more practical play 
than his "Hamlet." A bit out of vogue, nowadays, when 
actors have soft lungs and softer brains, I confess, but a 
good play for all that. "A Midsummer Night's Dream" is 
not so vast as to be taken as a representative work of 
Shakespeare; but it fairly well reflects the Bard of Avon 
in his moods of fun. And certainly Louis James and Kath- 
ryn Kidder, under the managership of Wagenhals and Kem- 
per, are giving the piece a delightfully free and picturesque 
performance at the Columbia. 

This rythmic, graceful, poetic skit of Shakespeare's has no 
star parts for star actors. I was surprised when Mr. James 
and Miss Kidder announced it for a season's star attraction, 
considering how unprofitable the same play had been in the 
hands of as good a company as Augustin Daly offered up 
here some six or seven years ago at the old Baldwin. But 
this production, while given by a company that on the whole 
cannot be compared with that of the late Daly, is in nearly 
every respect far superior to tnat of the Daly organization. 

The first token of age and unsymmetrical build in Ada 
Rehan reached me through the very Daly production of 
which I speak. She was, as Helen, huge — in leg, in voice, 
in gesture. The part calls for a smaller effort, which Miss 
Kidder, while somewhat cold, gives to good extent. I am 
not an arcn admirer of Miss Kidder. I have yet to be con- 
vinced that her sensational success in "Madame Sans Gene" 
was not an accident. But she has the certain accent and per- 
sonality that in a serio-comic part like that of Helen, wins. 
I admire her generously in the role. She is better than Ada 
Rehan in it. But do not for a second imagine that I mis- 
take Miss Kidder for the superior player. Helen is merely 
one of the parts that shows Miss Rehan at less than her best. 

In the frankly farcical character of Bottom, Mr. James is 
immense in comicality. The reformation of a tragedian has 
never been affected with such celerity and felicity as in this 
instance. Mr. James is really funny, and of his own accord. 
A rattling good Hermia is that of Jane Oaker; and the best 
Puck you ever witnessed, absolutely not of this earth, 
in its elfin glee, is by Ethel Browning. In my esteem Miss 
Browning is the bright particular incandescent of the pro- 
duction, notwithstanding the fact that the scenery is 
picturesque without a flaw. 

* • * 
Gymnastics rule at the Orpheum this week, three of the 
leading new turns belonging to the realm of muscle pure 
and simple. A star feature is the dizzily amazing work of 
the nine Nelsons, whose original breath-catchers get the 
spontaneous applause due any kind of first-rate art from 
grand opera to gymnastics. The troupe includes three ju- 
veniles, two boys and a girl, who are not the least speedy of 
the nine. "In the Spring of Youth," an indifferently funny 



sketch by Foy and Clark. The dancing of Lizzie and Vinie 
Daly has the rag-time cleverness of the real thing, and the 
Learner sisters are gilt-edged contortionists. Among the 
hold-overs there is considerable that is new, the Lockhart 
e'ephants performing several new miracles and the Mo'nt- 
ivontroi's trio giving several selections not heard here be- 
fore. 

* * * 

The "Nell Gwynne" craze has gone the rounds of the 
drama, and now it has struck the operatic stage with a 
flourish, so we are to have the virtues and vices of the red- 
haired favorite of the "Merry Monarch" discoursed musi- 
cally by the Tivoli troupe, the initial performance to be 
given on Monday evening nest. The opera, which is one of 
Planquette's, was seen here some years ago, but borne on 
the wings of the present "Nell Gwynne" furore next week's 
production is bound to be popular. Ferris Hartman will 
appear in the part of the "Beadle," which he took in the for- 
mer cast, and Mr. Webb will appear as "Weasel." Tom 
Greene will take the part of the "Duke of Buckingham," 
Joseph Fogarty of "Rochester," Amice Leichester of 
"Charles II," Georgie Cooper of "Marjorie," Arthur Boyce of 
"Falcon," Oscar Lee of "Talbot," Maud Williams of "Lady 
Clare," and Ida Wyatt of "Peregrine." 

The "Wizard of the Nile" will follow "Nell Gwyne," at the 
Tivoli, with the re-appearance of Alt Wheelan. 
« * • 

With Juliet Crosby to take a leading part, the Alcazar 
people need not dread the terrors of the farce comedy as 
they are showing in. their good presentation of William Gil- 
lette's "All the Comforts of Home" this week. Miss Crosby 
shows a natural humor on the cozy little O'Farrell-street 
stage, and her grace is always enjoyable. Among the male 
contingent Richard Webster hit as Robert Pettibone. The 
comedy of Frank Curtis, who made his bow before a San 
Francisco audience on Monday night, left a good impression. 
A full house and an enthusiastic audience gave all the favor- 
able criticism necessary for the piece. 

* • * 

The headlines for the Orpheum next week will include 
Murray and Lane, opera singers, who will present a reper- 
toire of popular numbers. Kathryn Osterman will be back 
again with a company to present a new dramatic sketch 
entitled "The Widow." The Orpheum management prom- 
ises a strong number in "The Empire City Four," who do 
a singing turn. 

• * * 

James M. Ward, long dear to the hearts of the melodrama- 
goers, made his re-appearance at the Central Theatre Mon- 
day night, and the standing reception he got from the au- 
dience pretty well attested that his memory has been kept 
green. Under the stimulus of applause Mr. Ward brought 
out his best Irish pathos in "A Celebrated Case," and hand- 
kerchiefs were at a premium between his exits and en- 
trances. Howard Hall as "Jean Renaud" was persecuted 
enough to suit even the most fastidious. Fay Courtney 
appeared as Adrienne, and Miron Leffingwell as the Count 
de Mournay. 

• * * 

Charles Erin Verner is here again, beginning his engage- 
ment Monday night at the Grand Opera House, in Bouci- 
cault's thundering Irish melodrama, "Arragh-na-Pogue," 
which is not the least among the hairbreadth dramas of the 
green old sod. 

» • • 

At the Columbia Theatre on the afternoon of Sunday, 
February 10th, the annual benefit given by the Theatrical 
Mechanics' Association will take place. The benefit on the 
afternoon of the 10th inst. will show a programme of unusual 
strength, as acts from the various theatres will come from 
the Louis James-Kathryn Kidder Company, presenting "A 
Midsummer Night's Dream," at the Columbia; Mrs. Fiske's 
company in "Tess," at the California; leading vaudeville 
acts from the Orpheum; the Tivoli Comic Opera Company; 
Charles Erin Verner and Morosco's Grand Opera House Com- 
pany; Belasco & Thall's Alcazar and Central Theatre; Wm. 
Brady's Company in the "Sorrows of Satan," from the Al- 
hambra Theatre; and acts from the Olympia, Chutes, 
Fisher's, and Oberon. The programme will open at 1:30, 
as its length will be such as to necessitate an early begin- 
ning in order that the performance be over at a seasonable 
hour. 






February 2. 1»0t. 



9AN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



Mr». Flake will present her rune-maker. 'Triw of the 
D Trborvllle»" at the California Th.am- next Hon | night 
for the Oral time In this city. The part of as dif- 

ferent from "Becky Sharp" as night is from day, and 
lally and dramatically the production Is i to be 

superior to anything yet pc — j a tad In San Francisco. Mrs. 
Flske Is said to have a powerful anj touching roll 
which she portrays with such force and clearness of expres- 
sion that "Tess's" true character, as Intended by Thomas 
Hardy, "a pure woman, faithfully presented," stands forth 
convincingly. The only matinee will he given on Saturday. 
and the demand for seats for the entire week is very large. 

• • • 

Henry Arthur Jones's peculiar drama, "Judah." will be 
put on at the Alcazar Monday night with Joseph Kllgour, 
their new leading man, to take the title role. The play I 
of the operations and final expose of a Bplritual-falth-cura 
crank, who. with the aid of his daughter, attempts to extort 
money from an English nobleman whose daughter Is dying 
of consumption. 

• • • 

The change in arrangements, placing the Bernhardt-Coque- 
lin engagement on the stage of the Grand Opera House, 
has left a two-weeks' void at the Columbia, which will re- 
main closed, after the Louis James-Kathryn Kidder engage- 
ment, till the 25th, when Mrs. Leslie Carter will appear in 
"Za-Za." 

• • • 

The first of the Henschel recitals will be given at Metro- 
politan Temple next Tuesday evening, an immense advance 
sale indicating that the music lovers of San Francisco are 
not allowing a last opportunity go by to hear the famous 
vocalists. Tuesday's programme will include selections from 
Cimarosa, Handel, Paridies, Monsigny, Beethoven, Schu- 
bert, Schumann, Chopin, Foote, Brahms, Donizetti, and Hen- 
schel himself, a valuable composer. Following next Tues- 
day evening's concert, the Henschels will be heard in re- 
citals as follows: Thursday afternoon, Feb. 7th, Saturday 
afternoon, Feb. 9th, Monday evening, Feb. 11th, Wednesday 
afternoon, Feb. 13th, and Thursday evening, Feb. 14th. 

• • * 

The appearance of Leopold Godowsky, the great Belgian 
pianist, is set for Sherman, Clay & Co.'s Hall on the after- 
noons of February 12, 13, and 15. This is Godowsky's first 
trip to the Coast, and in Germany, and particularly Berlin, 
where he has just been playing, he has been accorded by 
some critics a place among the greatest living pianists. 

• * * 

An announcement of importance is that of the concerts 
to be given by Leonora Jackson, the famous violinist, at the 
California Theatre on the afternoons of February 18th and 
20th. She will be supported by Josephine Elburna, soprano, 
and Selden Pratt, the pianist, who was here last season with 
Emma Nevada. 



Or-ph 



The Teething Period. 

Is the trying time in baby's life. Proper feeding then is 
most essential. To secure uniformity of diet use Gail Bor- 
den Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. Book "Babies" free. 
Borden's Condensed Milk Co., N. Y. 



The management of the Spark's Automobile Company 
are making two remarkable offers to all lovers of automo- 
biles. The first offer is to give to every person purchasing 
four hundred shares of the company's stock at $3 per share 
(par value $10), one automobile built to carry two persons. 
By the terms of the second offer it is possible for every per- 
son buying five hundred shares of the company's capital 
stock at $3 per share, to get free an automobile large enough 
to carry four persons. Any one wishing to get an automo- 
bile and to obtain stock which is sure to make big returns 
in the future, cannot afford to let this rare opportunity pass. 



Fay & Foster, at the Grand Hotel Cafe, serve from 

11 till 2 daily a commercial lunch to do credit to San Fran- 
cisco as "the city of commercial lunches." It will save you a 
trip home. 



Artistic Hardwood Grilles. 
Made to order. Prices reasonable. Pacific Grille Co., Adams' 
Building, N. E. Corner Sutter and Kearny streets. 



*«i! Fr»lict»o..'«llrr«l».l Mu.lo 11*11. 

eum. o'Piurcii ki.. katwi .<>H'.i<iliiiMii. 

M,irn»> I lartfttlc, 

Pojr and < V'lnl. l>«i>. i Wurtn 

and Uluicliard. 1 ha biovritiih. OWHHIll week t,f 

THE NINE NELSONS, 

Reserved fle»t* 23a: h*loony WU! "per* olialrn and box *et.u, W)o 
Mali new* Wednesday, mm u nifty. mid muiuUv. 



■M 



A ] -.__ TU«-.i^/, B«LA«fO ATitAM.. Manager*. 

r\lcazar I neatre. Phon M*in 

Week of February lib. 

Engagement of tin- pOptllU young MtOT JOSEPH KILOOUR, 
when w til he pretMO Od for the Jirsl lima in till* city ut popular 
prices, ES. Wllliird's su< . 

cJUDAH 

Matinees .Saturday anil Sunday. 
Ueserved prices: 15c., Hoc.. 3Ac„ 60c. 
In preparalion-AuguHln Daly's "A Night Off." 



Uottlob, Manx & Co., 

Lessees and Managers. 



Golumbia Theatre. 

To-night , Sunday night, and for a second and last week. Begln- 
ninir next Monday Wagenhulu and Kemper present MR ■ LoUlS 
JAMES and KAiIIKYN KIDDER and a sumptuous revival of 

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM 

Coming — to Moro-oo's Grand Opera House 
Bernhardt and Cociuelin. 
To the Aihainbra — Sousa. 

TI./-J ! 0«,-.« . r— . «. .«« Mas * Ernestine Keeling, 
I VOl I WPera nOUSC Proprietor and Manager. 

Last performances of 

THE FENCING MASTER 

Monday, February 4th, Plnnquette's celebrated comic opera, 
"NELL GWYNNE," to meet the popular demand. A char mine 
story wedded to beautiful music- 

Every Evenine ut o. Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp. 
Popular prices — 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 
Coming— The hit of the season, "Wizard of the Nile." 

P^I!-F~a-~!-* TU^^i^ THE popular HOUSE. 
V-'allTOrnia I neatre- Reservations by 'Phone, Main 171S 

Monday, February 4th, 

MRS, FISKE and her company present for the first time here 

TESS OF THE D'URBERVILLES 

A play in four acts by Lorimer Stoddard, from the novel by 

Thomas Hwrdy- 

only Matinee Saturday. 

Metropolitan Temple. 

THE HENSGHELS 

Grand Recitals. 

Next Tuesday evening:, at 8:15, Thursday afternoon, Feb- 7th, 

Saturday afternoon, Feb- 9th, Monday evening. Feb- 11th, 

Wednesday afternoon, Feb. 13th, Thursday evenine, Feb. 14th. 

Prices 75o to 82. All rese rved. 

SeatB on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the orowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand is society's gathering place after the theater 

over. 

WANTED 

A situation in a Commercial House. Thorough accountant and 
Spanish correspondent; would also accept employment as travelling 
salesman. Best of references can be given. Address 

C. H. C, in care of this paper. 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, TBB AWAJ $k£L G0 .im 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-1809. These pens are " the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United States 
Mb. Heney Hob, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 

Should use Damlana Bitters 
the great Mexican remedy 

It elves health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 823 Market 

street, San Francisco. Send lor circular. 



Weak Men and Women 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 




LibraryGabk 



#--~;--.'-- 




Thrilling Days in Army Life. During his many years of 

gallant service in the arm- 
ies o£ the Republic, General George A. Forsyth, U. S. A., had 
unusual opportunities for observing many phases of military 
life, and his personal experiences in connection with the mili- 
tary events of the Civil War, as embodied in his very inter- 
esting book, "Thrilling Days in Army Life," should find a 
host of appreciative readers. It is divided into four parts, 
the initial one, "A Frontier Fight," dealing with an incident 
of the Sioux War in 1868. Fifty-one men, with the author at 
t eir head, held at bay for several days almost a thousand 
Indian warriors. In this engagement General Forsyth was 
twice wounded. "An Apache Raid" gives a detailed account 
of the experiences of some of the Fourth United States 
Cavalry during the Apache raid into Arizona in 1882. "Sheri- 
dan's Ride," is the story of that famous ride from its incep- 
tion to the close of the day on which it ended. General For- 
syth was at that time acting as Aide-de-Camp to Major-Gen- 
eral Sheridan, then in command of the Army of the Shenan- 
doah. "The Closing Scene at Appomattox Court House" 
describes the manner of General Lee's capitulation, and the 
various well-known personages who were present when the 
terms of the surrender of the Confederate army were finally 
agreed upon and formally signed. Neither soldier nor civil- 
ian should miss these recollections of one who is as modest 
as he is brave, and who writes in a most absorbing manner of 
the momentous military events which have come under his 
personal observation. Mr. R. F. Zogbaum's fine illustrations 
are all they should be. Harper & Brothers, Publishers, 
New York. Price, $1.50. 

The Influence of Christ "There is every reason to believe 
in Modern Life. that in religion the critical epoch 

has gone and the creative era 
has come, that if once the pendulum moved far toward doubt 
now it is swinging back toward faith." So writes the Rev- 
erend Mr. Newell Dwight Hillis, pastor of Plymouth Church, 
Brooklyn, in the preface of his book, "The Influence of 
Christ in Modern Life." Some of the chapters have been 
used as addresses before various colleges and universities, 
and they represent as a whole an attempt to distinguish 
between the transient and permanent elements of religion. 
It is a study of the new problems of the church in American 
society. Sabatier says that "Man is incurably religious," and 
notwithstanding the fact that the old creeds have been pulled 
to pieces, and the intellect has completed its analytic work, 
while the tides of faith seem to be ebbing away, there is, 
the author claims, everywhere manifest a growing reverence 
for the teachings and character of Christ. The book bears 
many a message to those who are seeking to solve their 
doubts and reconstruct a working faith. A comprehensive 
index adds much to its value. The Macmillan Company, 
Publishers, New York. Price, $1.50. 

Her Club. "Brenda, Her School and her 

Club," a bright, interesting story 
for the young. It treats of girl life in Boston, with historic 
Boston and its many well-beloved and ancient landmarks 
as a background, but is sufficiently up-to-date to include a 
football game at Cambridge, and a very modern bazaar or- 
ganized by Brenda and her friends, all members of "The 
Four Club." The illustrations by Jessie Wilcox Smith are 
well done. Little, Brown & Co., Publishers, Boston, Price, 
$1.50. 

Smart Set. — In the February number of the Smart Set are 
announced the winners of the various prizes, amounting to 
$5,000, offered last year by the magazine for poems and 
stories. The leading story of the number is a clever 
novelette by Caroline Duer, entitled "Rumors and a Runa- 
way. " Mrs. Sherwood, Arabella Kenealy, Mrs. Van 
Rensselaer Cruger, Lloyd Osbourne, Barry Pain, and many 
others, contribute to this issue of a periodical that is daily 
gaining in popularity. 



My Indian Queen. Guy Boothby has the faculty of writing 
the flimsiest sort of fiction in a fashion 
that keeps the reader's interest from flagging, which is more 
than a great many more able writers can claim for them- 
selves. "My Indian Queen" is a record of the adventures of 
Sir Charles Verrinder, Baronet, in the East Indies. There 
are rajahs, nobles, elephants, and tigers, a Captain Aloysius 
O'Rourke, a soldier of fortune, the beautiful Lady Cicely 
Helderston, in love with Sir Charles, and other characters 
and accessories sufficient to make a very wonderful hodge- 
podge of impossibilities, which one follows nevertheless 
with interest to the end, thanks to Mr. Boothby's aforesaid 
happy faculty. D. Appleton & Co., Publishers, New York. 
(Appleton's Town and Country Library). Price, 50 cents. 

Brenda, Her School and Helen Leah Reed has written in 
Impression Leaflets for 1900 are announced for monthly is- 
sue, and include copyright material. The initial number is 
to be "Success for Young Men," by Charles A. Murdock, 
to be followed by other choice selections from the works of 
Robert Louis Stevenson, Phillips Brooks, William Ellery 
Channing, and original sources. Elder & Shepard, Pub- 
lishers, San Francisco. Subscription for the series, $1.00. 

Macaulay's Essay on Warren Hastings has recently been 
added to Macmillan's Pocket English Classics, a series much 
in use in secondary schools. The present little volume is 
edited by Mrs. Margaret J. Frick, head of the English De- 
partment in the Los Angeles High School, California, and 
is prefaced by a life of Macaulay and some notes of general 
interest. The Macmillan Company, Publishers, New York, 
Price, 25 cents. 

"A Kentucky Cardinal" and "Aftermath." — A beautiful 
and newly revised edition, with a new prefix, of James Lane 
Allen's "A Kentucky Cardinal" and its sequel, "Aftermath," 
has recently been issued in a large volume, handsomely 
bound in scarlet and gold. One hundred illustrations by 
Hugh Thompson reproduce admirably the charm of the blue- 
grass country and the frills and furbelows of a half-century 
ago. The publishers have done their best to make attractive 
the present edition of these deservedly popular books. The 
Macmillan Company, Publishers, New York. Price, $2.50. 

Daily Thoughts from French Writers. — A choice collec- 
tion of French quotations, carefully compiled, one or more 
for each day of the year, by Jeanne and Marguerite Bouvet, 
appears under the English title, "Daily Thoughts from 
French . Authors." La Rochefoucauld, Chateaubriand, and 
Balzac are generously drawn upon, as well as the later writ- 
ers. Emile Zola, Imbert de Saint-Amand, Edouard Rostand, 
and others. William R. Jenkins, Publisher, New York. 

"The Tribune Primer." — Eugene Field's first book, "The 
Tribune Primer," was issued in Denver in 1882, when the 
author was editor of the Denver Tribune. Not over fifty 
copies were printed at that time, of which probably less 
than ten are in existence. It is now republished with the 
original illustrations by John C. Frohn. The little book will 
be welcomed by those who are always ready to laugh at Mr. 
Field's funny fun. Henry A. Dickerman & Son, Publishers, 
Boston, Mass. 

Books Received. — Funk & Wagnalls Co. — The Religion of 
Democracy," by Charles Ferguson, Price, $1.00. 

D. Appleton & Co. — "A Hero in Homespun," by William 
E. Barton, (Town and Country Library), Price, 50 cents. 

Cassell & Co. — "Travels in the Interior of Africa," (Vol. 
II), by Mungo Park, (National Library Series), Price, 10 cts. 

The Macmillan Co. — "A Controversy and Some Opinions 
Concerning James Lane Allen's "The Reign of Law." 

M. E. B. 



PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A sovereign remedy. One dose will cure a cough. It never 
fails, 'try it. Price, 25 cents. George Dahlbender & Co., 
214 Kearny street. For sale by all druggists. 



BOOKS REVIEWED IN THIS PAPER 
Can be Obtained at 

Robertson's 126 Post street 



Ftbruary 2. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE SWEEPSTAKES AT TANFORAN TODAY. 

The San Francisco Jocker Club tins given no moro convin- 
cing proof of Its determination to promote by cvorjr meant 
in Its power the highest closs of sport than Is contained 
In the arranging of the special sweepstakes to be run at 
Tanforan to-day. The four three-year-olds engaged are 
the best on the Coast, and It Is no easy matter to ;■■ rsuade 
owners to allow such good horses to come together under 
these unusual circumstances. It speaks well for the hold 
that the San Francisco Jockey Club has established on the 
regards of practical racing men that the race was arranged. 

The four horses and their jockeys are: Prince Ponlatow- 
Ski's Drutal. 112 (O'Connor); W. C. de B. Lopez's Articulate, 
US iSloanei; W. Cahills Rolling Boer, 115 (Turner); 
and W. B. Jennings & Co.'s Canmore. 115 (Mounce). By no 
means the least interesting part of the race is that three 
out of the four are native-bred, and all bred by different 
men. The ownership of two horses is still essentially Cali- 
fornlan, while Canmore runs in the name of W. B. Jennings 
& Co., J. B. Haggln being the silent partner and real owner. 

Bnital was bred by the Messrs. Boots, and Is by their fa- 
mous old Sire, imp. Brutus, who has begotten such an enor- 
mous proportion of winners with comparative small oppor- 
tunities. Mr. Haggin bred Canmore, who is by imp. Midlo- 
thian, the sire of far-famed Sir Walter, out of that great 
mare, Fanny Louise. Articulate, though he is by Mr. Hag- 
%'a'e imported stallion, St. Andrew, was bred by Mr. Lopez. 
His dam, Utter, was bred and raced in Australia, and was 
considered one of the greatest mares ever foaled in that 
country, where Mr. Lopez bought her for a very large price. 
Rolling Boer was raised on the snug little farm that William 
Jennings, no relation to W. B. Jennings, has near Baltimore, 
Md. 

Such an event as this should be enough to prove to even 
the most stiff-necked that there is something more in racing 
than mere gambling. These are tried and proved horses, 
each and every one of whom has shown his quality on the lo- 
cal race tracks since the current season began. Since the 
sweepstakes were arranged, the discussion as to which 
horse will win has never flagged for a moment, and it so 
happens that the way races have eventuated in which these 
horses were engaged has increased the puzzle rather than 
diminished it. 

Tanforan will have a rousing crowd on hand to see the 
special, and it deserves all the patronage it can get. High- 
class events that arouse the genuine sporting instinct will 
do more to argue the cause of the turf than all the written 
and spoken eulogies conceivable. 



In a recent address to his employees, President John J. 
Valentine of Wells, Fargo & Co., said, with characteristic 
benevolence and good sense: "Unfortunately the fallacy is 
very general that a man who has gone to school eight or 
ten years in his youth is well educated. Nothing could be 
a greater mistake; because, properly considered, education 
goes on from the cradle to the grave." Much in keeping with 
this remark has been the policy of the Wells, Fargo Com- 
pany in the relation of its management to its employees. 
Reference libraries have been established in every terminal 
point of any importance in the country, and the stock of 
useful literature in each is increasing yearly. President 
Valentine announces as the latest addition to the library 
the Bible and Concordance, Standard Dictionary, Century 
Atlas, Shakespeare and Concordance, Fallow's Synonyms, 
Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, and Hayden's Dictionary 
of Dates, which have been placed in the libraries of thirty- 
five terminal points. These smaller libraries are in connec- 
tion with the company's large circulating libraries situated 
at New York and Jersey City, Chicago, Kansas City, San 
Francisco, and the City of Mexico, all of which are accessible 
to employees at all times, and selected with reference to 
giving them a knowledge which they might not, otherwise, 
have been able to gain. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, 

San Francisco, deals in all kinds of newspaper information, 
business, personal, political, from press of State, Coast, and 
country Tel. Main 1042. 



SOUTHPIELD WELLINGTON 
is the best coal for your range. 



USE NO SOAP 

with Pearline. 'Twould be 
absurd. It isn't necessary 
Pearline contains everythini 
a soapy nature that's needed or 
that's good ti> go with it. And 
Pearline is so much better than 
snap that it has the work all done 
before the soap begins to take any 
part. You're simply throwing away 
money. It's a clear waste of soap — 
— and soap may be good for some- 
thing, though it isn't much use in washing and 
cleaning, when Pearline's around 491 




MIDWINTER 
FICTION 
NUMBER 

THE FEBRUARY 

CENTURY 



Contributions from 

W. D. Howells 

Ruth McEnery Stuart 

Charles Battell Loomis 
Chester Bailey Fernald 
Bertha Runkle 
Sir Walter Besant 
Hamlin Garland 

Rebecca Harding Davis 
Amelia Gere Mason 
and many others. 

Four Midwinter Scenes in New York 

Pastels by Everett Shinn 

Humor and PathoB of the Savings-Bank 

Illustrated by A. I. Keller 

ReoordofaTourin Search of Andree 

By Jonas Stadling, Ful'y Illustrated 
Etc., Eto. 

Now Ready. Sold everywhere 35 cents, 

THE CENTURY CO., N. Y. 



Bethesda 



to swim in.' 



"I've prescribed 
enough ... 

— DB. Shbady, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liquar Dealers, 

Send for Pamphle 418 Saoramento Street, 

THE PACIFIC COAST REGULAR 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

Season Begins Nay 1, 1901. 

Four years' course. University graduates allowed one year advanced 
standing, Alt lectures between 6 p, m. and 10:30 p. m. Address, College 
Building, 818 Howard St, 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 



- - 



Looker Qh 




Ballade of the Paris Commission. 

Now that our State Commission 's back 

From gaieties of gay Paree, 
To answer for their sins, alack! 

What will their condemnation be? 

When all their pranks are held in fee 
The Record-Angel's books to fill, 

Will it be written finally 
That Billy Foote must foot the bill? 

The Record Angel, keeping track 

Had little leisure, seems to me — 
Those medals sold to fill the sack, 

Those drinks that seethed, an inland sea, 

Those fists that punched pugnaciously 
'Twixt Foote and Truman passed, until 

The knowing ones could not but see 
That Billy Foote must foot the bill. 

The stern committee's frown is black. 

Though Gaskill makes pathetic plea, 
And Runyon swears no spicy snack 

Of wine or noisy jamboree 

Flavors their acts from A to Z. 
Yet some there are enquiring still, 

May some who danced escape scot free 
And leave Bill Foote to foot the bill? 

L'ENVOI. 
Foote, though champagne and strong cognac 

Should bring your brethren to the grill, 
It seems a pity, coming back, 

That Foot alone should foot the bill. 
* * * 

Professor Allardyce, who teaches mathematics at Stan- 
ford University, comes from Edinburgh, where the Scotch 
has an English blend that is more intensely British than 
London itself. It was Allardyce, they say, who introduced 
the "London lope" into University peripathetics, anil cer- 
tain it is that he taught the undergraduate the first lessons 
in golf, held first presidency of the Stanford University Golf 
Club, and was instrumental in the selection of the more or 
less interesting links that lie behind the college campus. 

Of golfiacs there is undoubtedly none more ravenous for 
play than that Scot, Allardyce. He brings his clubs and his 
caddies to classes, and he keeps ofiice-hours on the green- 
sward; in fact, the athletic mania of the brawny professor 
has become a proverb among the students, and, so I am told, 
a matter of not a little quiet josh among the faculty brother- 
hood. 

The other day Allardyce came into class with a very glum 
face, for it had been raining hard and there was very poor 
picking on the links. At the end of the hour, as he was 
stepping down from the rostrum, he met a smiling miss with 
a naughty little twinkle in her eye. 

"Excuse me, Professor Allardyce," she gurgled. "But would 
you explain something to me?" 

"Certainly, my dear young lady," replied the professor, 
eyeing longingly a bran-new lofter in the corner. 

"Well, it's quite a difficult problem, and maybe I had bet- 
ter not ask it." 

"By all means ask it, by all means," insisted Allardyce, 
with polite impatience. 

"Well, if you think it's a fair question, I should like to 
know if golf isn't just the same as shinney." 

Nobody knows what the professor said, but certain it is 
that he had that same young lady out on the links learning 
the game on the next sunny day. And what is more peculiar 
she was leading him a pretty chase to keep up his end of 
the score. 

You see, she had bet a box of bon-bons that she was not 
afraid to ask that question about shinney. I am told that 
it was a faculty member who paid the bet. 



One of those peculiar little tragic comedies with a happy 
ending occurred in the Tivoli the other night. Some time 
before the curtain rose one of the boxes had been filled 
by such a crowd as once long ago made the demand for thea- 
tre boxes. They cared as little for the '"Fencing Master' 
as six people imbued with the sweet sense of sound and the 
price of an opera could care. Their chairs faced the audi- 
ence, and their conversation and gestures were directed 
with a deliberate intent to charm. As the lights went 
on after the first act, a modest looking young fellow, escort- 
ing a decidedly pretty girl, entered and took seats in the 
parquet. He glanced about the theatre till his eye caught 
the party in the box, when he started eagerly. 

"Look," he said to his friend, "there is Ernest!" 

"Who's Ernest?" asked the girl. 

"Why, my brother-in-law from Hollister," he answered. 
"I didn't know he was in town; I'll send him a note and tell 
him to meet me in the caf6 after the next act." 

"Are you sure it's he?" asked the girl. 

"Of course," he answered. "See, there's that funny tooth 
of his." 

Taking a slip of paper from his pocket, he wrote his note, 
and gave it to one of the ushers with directions to deliver 
it to the gentleman with the light beard. The note was de- 
livered. The gentleman with the light beard read it. laughed 
loudly and passed it on. One after another of the party read 
it and laughed. The usher was called back and apparently 
asked to point out the writer, for he did so. When the 
usher pointed they cringed and tried to slip out of sight. 
The box party gathering their lorgnettes and glasses directed 
them like a battery at the place pointed to. By this time the 
whole theatre was interested and the luckless couple were 
flushing and trembling under the brazen cynosure. They 
started to leave, but did not seem able to rise, and the girl 
in sheer despair began to cry. This evoked a general laugh 
from the box, from all except the gentleman with a light 
beard, who had assumed a stern dignity, and glared scorn- 
fully down at the unfortunate criminals. Lights down for 
the next act averted the imminent crisis of hysteria. 

After the theatre, nine people found themselves close to- 
gether at the entrance — the dox party, the young couple, and 
the Looker-On. The young fellow saw his tormentor, 
paused diffidently, and then went resolutely up to him. 

"Pardon me," he said quietly, "it was I who sent you that 
note. I mistook a friend for you. The resemblance seemed 
very complete." Even then he had apparently finished his 
speech and was turning away, when the man addressed, with 
an imperious wave of his hand, said: 

"Will you kindly step aside! You're in the lady's way." 

The boy displayed a rather different flush from that in 
the theatre, and returned. 

"Pardon me again," he said, "but the man for whom I took 
you to be was a gentleman." In an instant he was gone, 
and the box party stood staring at each other, impotently. 



Billy Foote is throwing spasms over the Paris Commis- 
sion investigation, and threatens to hold everybody "per- 
sonally responsible." That sounds big, but means little, and 
i; recalls a good story that shows how Foote has come by 
his bluster honestly. It was in the Confederate Congress 
that Foote's father represented Tennessee, and Albert Gal- 
h tin Jenkins sat for Virginia. One day Foote loudly con- 
demned the Fabian policy of the administration in ordering 
General Albert Sidney Johnston to retire. Jenkins got up 
to reply, and he said: 

"While listening to the distinguished gentleman, I was 
reminded of an incident in the life of Hannibal. One night 
in Athens Hannibal attended a lecture, and it happened 
that the lecturer took for his theme the life and military 
character of Hannibal. When the lecture was concluded, 
and they were leaving, a friend asked Hannibal what he 
thought of the lecture. The reply of Hannibal fits the gen- 
tleman from Tennessee like that wedding garment of which 
he spoke." 

At this point Foote jumped from his seat and advancing 
on Jenkins, he exclaimed: 

"I demand that the gentleman from Virginia Instantly tell 
this House what Hannibal's reply was." 

Jenkins stood calmly smiling and stroking his beard, and 
Foote unable to restrain himself any longer shouted: 

"I know what Hannibal's reply was. Hannibal said the 



Ftbruary 2. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



II 



lecturer «u • .! ,i old f<->i Now. I tanand < ■ ki o» ami 

I with to hare a catogorbal ■ 

from Virginia Intend to apply that languai.. 

Jenkloi smiled again, an. I then he answers with delib- 
eration: 

" being n classical scholar like thi -h-.l 

man from Temnsnq, I .,, i | 
That Hannlbnls reply was. bat I thought it »:i- 
like this — that M a genera] rule . mlians ■ 
t military etftii 
"Your explanation is entirely satlsfa. I 
as he went back to bis seat. 

The Foole family gun is not loaded, but it i* always on 
half rock. 

• • • 

Flournoy Tubbs is a legless elSTator rann at the Ni 
Hall, but his misfortune has not taken the sunshine from 
his heart by a good deal. Last month Tubbs invested in a 
rair of wooden nether limbs, and ever since has been trying 
to get used to them by wearing them every other day. 

J. Bradford Hawthorne, the other elevator man at the 
Hall, is also a cripple, and likewise a joker. The Hall is 
infested with oil stock promoters, and Hawthorne mentioned 
to several of his speculative friends that Tubbs was looking 
for a chance to invest. The promoter called on Tubbs. and 
happened to catch him without his store leg. and was so 
much encouraged by his talk that he called again the fol- 
lowing day with a pocket full of brand-next stock. 

But he did not recognize the fine-looking fellow who 
stood there at the door of the elevator. 

"Where's the fellow who was here yesterday?" asked the 
promoter. 

"The fellow without legs?" inquired Mr. Tubbs. 

"Yes." 

"Oh. he's off to-day, and I'm taking his place." 

"He's talking about buying some oil stock from me," the 
promoter went on: "and if you can spur him up to the stick- 
ing point there's a hundred in it for you." 

"I'd like to accommodate you," Tubbs said, "but I'm afraid 
you're a little too late. My friend has just gone down to 
Pine Street with $5,000 to buy stocks. He said that the 
man he expected had disappointed him." 

"Let me off this elevator as quick as the devil will let 
you!" shrieked the promoter, and he made a bee-line for Pine 
street, where he is still looking for his legless friend. 
* • * 

Judge M. C. Sloss is the youngest of the new Judges on the 
Superior Court bench, and ex-Judge Barna McKinne is one 
of the most venerable of the practitioners at the bar in this 
city. His snowy locks afford him protection, no matter 
what risky things he may say. 

It was a mechanics' lien case that was before the court, 
and the proper construction of a brick walk on Eddy street 
near Mason was under investigation. 

"A good walk, your Honor, a good walk in every respect, 
as we shall show," Mr. McKinne said. Then as if to clinch 
it, he added: "It is as good brick work as any in the Poodle 
Dog building near at hand, with which your Honor is doubt- 
less familiar." 

"With the exterior," said Judge Sloss coldly, and McKinne 
tried to grin, but he realized that his humor had slipped a 
cog, and that he had failed to score the point as he expected. 



No one dared to take up the challenge sale in furniture and car- 

peta, of the Pattosien Co. This practically settles the fact that this 
great house is alone in the field in regard to low prices for high grade 
furniture and carpets. Just now $75 new styles of birdseye mapJe 
suits are selling at $45; they are the kind which came in the new 
arrivals. A carload of new Wilton velvet carpets, (he $1.50 make, 
will sell at $1.05 at the great challenge sale of the Pattosien Co. 

Child eharaoter Btudy. Professional adaptation; diagnosis. Mrs. Win 
MeManm, 731 Guerrero street. 



Of course you must go to the CafS Zinkand after the 

show is oyer. That is where you can get the most elegant 
little suppers, see the best people and hear the best music. 
Globe trotters say that it keeps pace with cafes abroad. 



Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. 

Cooper & Co., 746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Piano lessons, 75c. Experienced teacher. Good testimonials. Blake. Mofflt & Tome, los Anuelea. 
419 Van Ness Avenue. Blake, McFall & Co., Portland Or. 



vVV<V>V^AV»V^\VAN*^>AVVVVVVVVVVVVVl»v 

IMNINM REDUCTION 

IS 

Fine Furniture 

From I irlv Renaissance 
To Colonial Epochs. 

Tapestry, Velvets, Damasks 
aud Lace Curtains 

FROM 25 tO 50 PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 
In Old Brasses, Marble Statues, Bronzes, Italian 
Majoliche and Objects of Att. Also 

Oil PaintinSTS B > Famous Masters 

*^ 8CCB AS 

C. DETTI, LAZERGER, BEAUQUESNE, 

MAES PORTEJE, SIMONETTI, 

YASPARINI, SALA, ETC 

The P. Rossi Co. 

229 Sutter Street, 

Bet. Grant Ave, and Kearny St., San Francisco. 
vWMAM/^A^vW»\ M A^A>vV W vVAMivywlV 



Our Annual 
Reduction Sale 



Will positively close 
Saturday, 9th inst. 



Now On 



S. & Q. GUMP CO., 

113 Geary Street. 




WELL, I AH DELIGHTED! 

After scribbling: for years to find that with 
The American $11 Typewriter 

I can have up-to-date business methods at 
such a small cost. It is as well made as the 
highest-priced machines, but more simple. 
lla* stood the test; seven years without a 
competitor. Catalogue and sample ot work 

AMERICAN TYPEWRITER CO., 

F. A, Marriott. Pflc. Coast Aert, 5% Kearny 
San Francisco, California. 



Blake. Moffitt & Towne 



Telephone Main 199 



Dealers in PAPER 

5B-B7-W-61 First street. S. P. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 




A Northern mining man, who has done 
Lack of Courtesy much to develop the mining industry 
to Mining Men. of the Pacific Coast, has registered 
complaint about the lack of courtesy 
he has received from representative business men of this 
city. He says in an interview published in the Post last 
week that the only men from whom he got anything like 
good fellowship were those who knew he was here to buy 
machinery, and who were in a position to profit by it. From 
others whom he had approached in a sociable spirit he re- 
ceived several unmerited rebuffs. It is not often that a man 
is met with who has the temerity to denounce such boorish 
treatment, which is not the reputation the city has borne in 
the past for hospitable treatment of strangers. Times have 
changed here, however, within the past ten years, and new 
San Francisco is not as open-hearted nor open-handed as 
the old -appy-go-lucky burg of the palmy days gone by. 
Still, as a rule civility is commonly met with, especially 
among the class which lives by catering to the miner. Boors 
among the manufacturers are an exception, fortunately few 
and far between. Still, a little rubbing down like this occa- 
sionally is wholesome, coming from a stranger within our 
gates, who has traveled sufficiently to be able to draw a 
correct comparison between the manners which prevail 
here and elsewhere. It is good now and again to see our- 
selves as others see us, to the end that we may correct mat- 
ters of bad form, especially in the way of common courtesy, 
which costs nothing. Mining men, who are known to be 
"seeking," as looking for financial aid is glibly termed, no 
doubt are correct in speaking of this city as the "coldest" on 
the map. This is a very common experience, and no expla- 
nation can be given for what must seem a peculiarly anoma- 
lous conuition in a city which looks largely to the mining in- 
dustry for support, and which was founded and elevated 
to its present pitch of prosperity by the profits of operations 
in the mines. It would be better otherwise, no doubt, and 
the surprise of a stranger and a mining man of more than 
ordinary enterprise at snubs where a friendly reception, to 
say the least, was expected, can readily be understood. 
His rebuke thus publicly expressed may have some good 
effect, and it is to be hoped it will, in the interest of our 
local commercial development. 

Trading has grown dull again in the 

The Pine-Street Comstock mining market, owing to the 

Market. set-back in Con.-Cal.-Virginia, brought 

about by bear tactics. Interest for the 
time being has waned among outside dealers, and the street 
has the game to itself again, with the usual result shown in 
the daily list of transactions. Ophir has acquired by act of 
the stockholders at a meeting on Monday last some new 
ground of reputed value in the vicinity of the Burning 
Moscow claim, from which considerable money has been 
taken in the past. In the middle mines and at the south- 
end the installation of electric machinery is proceeding 
rapidly, and before long things should be in shape to proceed 
with work in the deep levels. The price of shares in these 
groups is getting down to bed rock in the fullest sense of the 
term, and dealers who have the nerve to tackle them with 
good judgment will make money in the long run. It is not 
likely that the bottom is going to drop out of the market en- 
tirely, nor is the business going out of existence, however 
trying present conditions may be to the temper and patience 
of operators. 

The California oil producer has learned 
Attempt to Ruin at last, like a great many others who 
Oil Industry. labor in the vineyard, that the so-called 
legislators of the State are not in Sac- 
ramento for the benefit of their health. The California 
Petroleum Miners' Association and the Producers' Oil Ex- 
change find it necessary now to protest against a bill which 
practically puts a cinch upon the industry should it be 
passed. Years ago the "push" in politics used to have the 



Pilot Commission and the British insurance companies in a 
corner every time the Legislature met, and it was a case of 
bleed or die. Now a new and flourishing industry has grown 
up in the State, and the lariat has it promptly in the coil, 
under the guise of legislation. If this is an honest bill, why 
does it only apply to the manufacture of oil in California up 
to a certain fire test, ignoring the importation and sale of 
Eastern grades many degrees lower. It is to be hoped that 
if this bill is not killed in committee, that there will be 
enough decency in the House to floor it effectually. It is 
claimed by the oil men that Pennsylvania, the parent State 
of the oil refining industry, only requires a fire test of 110 
degrees Fahr., maximum, while this bill now presented to 
the Legislature of California calls for test of 130 degrees 
Fahr. If this law is passed it will work a serious injury to 
an industry which has already worked wonders in the way of 
benefiting the State. It would practically destroy the business 
of the oil refiners, at whom the blow is principally aimed. 
This bill should be promptly killed. 

The public is now heavily Interested In 
Oil Shares in the speculative end of the oil industry, 
Demand. and the record for the week has been 

larger than ever in share transactions on 
the Board. Prices have not responded at all times to re- 
ports of "gushers," which have been more frequent of late 
in some of the leading districts, but on the whole, fluctua- 
tions have been lively enough to permit of profit taking by 
those who buy for turns in the market, and not as an invest- 
ment. Four Oil has wheeled into line as a dividend payer. 
This tip has been on the street for some weeks past, and the 
price has risen somewhat in consequence. It remains now 
to be seen whether the old rule on Pine street to short a 
stock when dividends are declared will apply on the Oil 
Exchange. Another active stock during the week has been 
Caribou, which has strengthened in price considerably since 
the assessment was declared. The fact that this company 
has valuable oil ground has now been satisfactorily deter- 
mined; the stock is very firmly held in consequence, with 
every indication that it will sell much higher during the com- 
ing year. The delinquent list on this occasion will be short, 
a large proportion of the assessment having already been 
paid into the company's treasury, coming in freely from the 
very first day of the levy. Monarch has been active of late, 
on the strength of another good strike in well No. 2. The new 
San Francisco Exchange is now fully organized, and the 
Pacific Board, where it will meet, is undergoing a renovation, 
thorough in every respect, no expense being spared to make 
the new home of the oil men as bright and cheery as possi- 
ble. The personnel of this Board is all that could be de- 
sired viewed from a business standpoint. 

The mining men are having their innings 

Mining Bills in before the Legislature, and bills are un- 
Legislature der discussion which please some and 
displease others, who can see only 
a benefit to private interests. In regard to the proposition 
for a dam, the question is raised as to who owns the water 
rights and the disposition of profits from a possible power 
plant, all of which will doubtless develop in time after the 
bill is passed. Prominent men in the business favor the ap- 
pointment of a mine inspector. Should the bill to this effect 
be approved it will only place the industry in California 
on an equal footing with other parts of the world. We are 
behind the times in this respect, mining inspection having 
for many years been in vogue in Great Britain, Australia, 
and all the other mining centers of the world. Here the only 
opposition comes from mine owners, who fear a position 
of the kind would be abused, as it certainly would if a rascal 
got the appointment. In the hands of an honest official no 
danger need be apprehended, and surely it cannot be pre- 
sumed that there are none of this class in the business. In 
this case the passage of the bill might be accepted as an 
advance step in the right direction. 

The Grand Pacific Oil Company is making rapid headway 
on well No. 1, in Contra Costa County. They are now down 
somewhere in the neighborhood of 300 feet, and have en- 
countered seepages of high grade oil In the shale. They are 
now in a blue shale and sand formation averaging twenty 
feet per day. 

"Money," the well-known and prominent London Journal 
of Finance and Trade, has removed its offices to 303 Mansion 
House Chambers, Queen Victoria street, E. C. 




HE GREAT FOUR CORNERED 

\CE, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1901. 

kN FRANCISCO JOCKEY CLUB, 

\NFORAN. 



Horse. Weight. 

BRUTAL 119 

CANMORE 110 

ROLLING BOER 124 
ARTICULATE... 122 



6'/ 2 
6 
6 



» 



s 



stance 

RLONGS 



Time. 

1.27'/ 4 

1.20% 

1.14 

1.13/4 




oe r 




v <2ocr\more" 




San Francisco News Letter, February 2, 1901. 



February 2, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



THE VICTORIA MEMORIAL. 

Everything In now arranged fur the Vi. '.irln memorial scr 
rice, which will bo held to-day at 2:30 p. m. In I! 
Ira' Pavilion. It Is regrettable that many thousands will bo 
disappointed, aa the full capai ity of the building Is • 
in the supply of tickets Issue. I Only those who applied and 
registered early In the week, and have (jot their li 
are sure of admission. Tin h many win 

late will be disappointed. The service will be ceremonial 
throughout, the chants and funeral marches haTloi 
selected from old favorites of the dead Queen. Old sol- 
diers and sailors who have served under the flag will be 
given especial prominence, while on the platform will be 
representatives of the United States army. navy, the con- 
sular corps, and civic representatives, with the i 
A choir of 350 voices will sing "Crossing the Bar" and 
other favorite hymns of her late majesty. Altogether the 
affair will be worthy the occasion, and memorable, showing 
as it will the love and respect which existed among residents 
of this great country for the Lady of Windsor as a woman 
and a Queen. 

Following- arc the transactions on tho Stock and Bond Exchange from 
Jan 21th to Jan. 3Ulb, 1«01 

msoBLuureoos bon-ds 

California St SV . L00n@116 OkM « mcr Co 5V. 10.000 9 I"'. '» 

Contra ost* .1 lo.seog lie"! OaaaaJaS^ObSX i.oui<4io-M 

Hawaiian Com .-.%.«!.'■»' * IMV"I - - K .V S .1 V By 5%_ 10.000 9 lin-larti 

LoaAncIa Ky. 5* 8.000(9 1I1S-1I2*S. P. of A.By 8'« B.OO0 0UI-1U0J 

Mkts|.l»tMl«6'«.. 4.000 @\l:'; S I' Branch S's 21.0009 

Norl.,1 !{..- , -120 -. V. W.W.6'8 . 35.000 & 111 1 . 

OkidTnuit Co6%... 7.000 @ 114-lllKS V W W t's 3 Mtg... l.(««J 9 1O.0J 

STOCKS. 
Water. Shares. H'st L'st. SroAB Stocks. 
Contra Costa Water.. 20 MS 60 " Bn \ ~'f„ *$, ,? 

spring vita, water. .39 •& «x »°^ nr; .;;;;;;;;;; jg «g &, 

Oas ASD ELKCTRIC „. , Kl l»ueB 365 2\% tVi 

Equilablo 130 3 f?»Makawell 215 nVt 42 

Mutual Electric 450 8 6>i Paauhau S PI Co 265 3*33 32's 

Pac. LightCo 5 43 44 Powdkbs 

Oakland Has. 20 50 50 G | a „ u .' )r,0 83% 83 

Pacilic Oaa Imp 30 41 « Vigorit 50 2H 2% 

GhM&SUH 210 IT'/i »<Xar™™..— . 

aa? Miscellaneous. 



Bid. Asked 



'Alaska Packers IKS 126 125% 



SP Gaslight ■ 600 i% 

Basks c a T7 Fruit tanners.. 20 106 106' 

Cal Safe Deposit 35 105>i 105M Cal Wine Assi 935 100 lnO 

Steekt Railroads. Pacific Coast Borax.. 60 155 154 

Market Street 5 68>a 68K Oceanic S S Co 5 103 103 

Transactions for the week amount te 531" shares stock and 170 000 
bonds, against 8779 shares stock and 139,000 bonds for the previous 

Trading during the week has been light, with little change in 
prices from those of last week. 

UNLISTED SECURITIES. 
Bid. Asked 

Abbey Land 4: Imp. Co 1 00 Monarch 80 

Equitable Gas Co (pool) 20nSunset (original) 45 

Sanitary Reduction W'ks 1 00 California Fortune 6U 

People's Mutual Tel. Co 20 00 Santa Maria ■ 08 

Cal. Auto. Telephone 1 50 Oriental 40 

California Mutual 50 Rival 20 

Oil Stocks. 

Fresno Alpha ( San Lion (Sunset) 25 

Benito 81.00 Senator (Kern River) 2.15 

Aztec Oil Com'y (Kern Kern River Oil and De- 
River 81.40 .... velopment Co 20 

Bachelors (Sunset) 25 Meridian 08 

Big Panoche t Panoche) 20 Wellington 25 

Diamond (Sunset) 25 

Mining Stocks. 

Argonaut (Jackson) 2 75 Victor Gold Mines 

Dutch (Tuolumne) 20 (Marysville) 50 

N. Light (Cape Nome)... 12% Lightnerl Angels Camp) 2 00 ...... 

Santa Rosalia (Mexico) 35 Mazeppa (Tuolumne) 30 

Brunswick(Grass Valley) 20 30 La Fortuna (Arizona) .. 75 

Orders for buying or selling above stocks (listed and unlisted) promptly 
attended to by m , „ , „ DC 

Joseph B. Toplitz, Stock Broker. Tel. Bush 385. 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange. Rooms 9 and 10, 330 Pine street. 



College of Palmistry. 

This fascinating study can now be acquired easily and is within 
reach of all. Latest methods of study at the Chirological College, 
309 Powell street, We furnish the course with books in classes of 
10. $12; classes of 15, $5. Special attention to private pupils. Bead- 
ing oral or written ; evenings by appointment. Office hours from 
10 to 5. Courses by mail. For further particulars address Mrs. 
Baldwin, 309 Powell street, S. F. 



Famous beauties cannot afford to expose their com- 
plexions to cheap cosmetics, so Mrs. Kendall, Ellen Terry, 
Adelina Patti, and thousands of others professionally fair, 
endorse Camelline for the skin. 



Over/and Monthly 

FEBRUARY [9tH 

SPECIAL FEATURES IN THIS NUMBER 

Franceses: A Tale of Fisherman'* Wharf. (Illustrated) 

By Jans Van Dusen 

" 1600." (Story) By Helen E. Wright 

The Cascades. Mill Valley. (Illustration). 

With Whips and Scorns. (Story) By Edward F. Cahill 

Cy Warman and His Boys. (Illustrated) 

By Elizabeth Vore 

The Princess Ronhilda and the Princess Laluaba. (Story). 

Illustrated By Wardon Allan Curtis 

Great Salt Lake. (Poem).... By Marian Warner Wildman 
A Glimpse of Belvedere. (Illustration). 

A Story of San Juan Capistrano. (Illustrated) 

By Harry R. P. Forbes 

D. Cupid, Hack-Writer. (Poem) By Wallace Irwin 

Bettina, the Redemptioner. (Story) 

By Jeannette H. Walworth 

Sea Change. (Poem). Illustrated.. .By Herman Scheffauer 

Chinese Jews By A. Kingsley Glover 

Answered. (Poem) By Elinor Merrill 

The Aztec Calendar Stone. (Illustrated) 

By Adelia H. Taffinder 

The Light That Blinded. (Story).. By Lou Rodman Teeple 

Coffee Culture in Mexico. (Illustrated) 

By Laurence M. Terry 

The Land of William Tell By Jane Nearlein 

With John James Ingalls By James Matlock Scovel 

The Lion as Game. (Adventure) .... By Fred Harvey Major 
The Red, Black and Yellow. (Essay).. By John T. Bramhall 
Books: To Read or Not to Read. 
A Matter of Opinion. 

nining Hachinery s n U p Plle8 

The Ropp Straight Line Furnace. 

Huntington Centrifugal Roller Mill. 

Bartlett Concentrating Table. 

James Ore Feeder, 

Roger Improved Crushing Rolls. 

Dodge Rock Breakers and Pulverizers. 

Two and Three Stamp Mills. 

Engines, Boilers, Steam and Power Pumps. 

Wood-Working and Iron-Working Machinery. 

PARKE & LACY CO., 2 » and 23 Fremont St 

San Francisco 

A. B. TREADWELL Attorney-at-Law 

(Formerly Judee Police Court No. 4) 

HAS RESUMED PRACTICE at 633 Kearny St., cor. Sacramento St. 

All legal business attended to promptly. 



ABOUT TRAVEL 



No. 8. 



We were the Inventors of the Tourist System. Thomas 
Cook started it in 1841, and we have been improving and ex- 
tending the "system" ever sin'e. Whatever the require- 
ments of the traveler, we claim to furnish them in their en- 
tirety, and we are the Only Firm possessing the facilities 
to do so. With offices in Every Part of the World, we offer 
travelers the greatest protection and every assistance. We 
make no charge whatever for our services, our tickets being 
Always the Cheapest. 

Want a Short Holiday? Here are pleasant trips to Hawaii, 
18 days. All expenses for $150. Thirty days, ?230. Next 
dates, February 13th and 23d. Tour to Japan March 30th, 
$600, all expenses included. 

THOMAS COOK & SON, 

621 Market Street, San Francisco. 
Programme of European tours ready. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 




Imu 



'■f**r1$&§VS&!ZZ 



ranee 




"A contemporary, harassed by the idea that his mission 
ir. life is to publish a monthly newspaper, is at the pains 
to inform an outraged but limited universe that some of 
his time-tried "news" items have been worked over by a 
loathed and lazy rival. And this is not all. The damning 
feature of the offense is that of seventeen items, nine were 
printed before our monthly contemporary could find oppor- 
tunity to make use of them himself. One thing there is 
that insurance men may as well understand now as at any 
other time. If they want their news fresh every month the 
practice of daubing it all over the pages of daily and weekly 
journals must be frowned upon and discouraged." — Adjuster. 

Some insurance men prefer their news fresh every week, 
and the only kind that won't keep fresh for that period is 
usually preserved in a bulletin seasoned with the same ingre- 
dient used in cooking beans. Not oil. 

* * * 

The celebrated Tarrant case is now in a fair way to get 
settled in the courts and the question of the liability of the 
companies will thus be determined. The Coroner's in- 
quest brought in the following verdict: "We find that 
the explosion was occasioned by the storage of com- 
bustable chemicals in excess of the quantity permitted by 
law, and we hold Tarrant & Co. criminally responsible for 
the deaths of deceased." The report of the special com- 
mittee appointed to inquire into the liability for their losses 
caused by the Tarrant explosion gives the conclusions of 
its counsel as follows: "The policies upon the building of 
Tarrant & Co. were, as to the insured, void; but that as to 
the mortgagee, such policies were valid. The companies 
liable thereon should, therefore, upon the payment of the 
came, take subrogation as against Tarrant & Co. That so 
far as the contents of said building belonged to Tarrant & 
Co., the policies upon such contents were invalid. So far as 
such contents belonged to persons other than Tarrant & 
Co.. insured under separate policies, where such insured had 
goods on storage in excess of the amounts allowed by law, 
such policies were void; and, where the insured had not vio- 
lated any provisions of the law, such policies were valid. As 
to losses on buildings destroyed by explosion the companies 
were liable for the damage by the fire ensuing, but not for 
explosion damage. The companies were not liable for the 
damage caused by explosion alone." So the companies will 
now refuse to pay. and until the courts have settled the mat- 
ter any expression of opinion would be futile. 

The Fire Marshall summarizes the loss as follows: 
"Total loss of life was seven, ien buildings, with contents, 
were totally destroyed, thirty-five buildings were damaged 
considerably, and two hundred others had windows and plate 
glass broken hy the concussion. Estimated damage by 
fire and explosion, $1,000,000. partly covered by insurance." 

* * * 
The Home of New York did a Coast business of $478,967; 
loss ratio, 56.5. These figures were made public first in the 
Coast tables published on the 28th instant by the Pacific 
Underwriter. According to the same authority the loss 
ratio for California business was 41.8 as against 52.1 for 1899, 
and for the Coast business 44.3 as against 44.6 for 1899. 

* • • 
Lou W. Hazen, who received his insurance education in 
the two Dakotas, has been appointed by General Agent 
Lenehan of the Phenix as special agent for that company. 
Headquarters at Los Angeles. Field, Southern California, 
Arizona and New Mexico. 

• * • 

The Pacific Mutual Life's Thirty-third Annual statement 
shows gains in assets of 382,123; total assets, $4,112,116; 
and a gain in income of $363,482; it paid to policy holders 
during the year, $755,870.15, and received for premiums 
$1,853,283.37, and had a total income of more than $2,000,000 
— a home company to be proud of. 



The Mercantile of Boston is expected to move from Baggs 
& Stovel to the agency of Christensen, Edwards and Good- 
win; this is presumably the result of the acquisition by the 
American Central of the Mercantile, which was reported in 
a previous edition of the News Letter. 

Occidental — Will someone please tell us what has become 
ot this? 

Tudor J. A. Tiedemaun has been appointed by Superin- 
tendent of Agencies John Kelly as General Agent of the 
Scottish Union and National to succeed C. R. Medcraft. He 
controls the same territory and the Department will be con- 
tinued. 

George W. Turner is at his desk again after a long illness. 

Howard E. Perrin, General Agent of the Washington Life 
is in New York conferring with the company on matters of 
mutual interest. 

General Agent Lenehan of the Western Department of the 
Phenix of Brooklyn, has arrived in San Francisco. Mr. 
Lenehan is a graduate from the local agency school and if 
we mistake not commenced his insurance experience in Iowa, 
and has successfully taken all the courses m training from 
solicitor to manager, and the result is shown in his success. 

A. A. Andre, the well-known independent adjuster, is 
married. 

D. B. Wilson is attending to business again after his long 
sickness. 

Leslie Bates denies the truth of the item printed in the 
previous edition of the News Letter that he had been drink- 
ing coffee when he sprained his ankle. 



Mexico, in late years, has become almost a part of the 
United States, thanks to American enterprise, which has 
built railroads, planted factories, and taught the mysteries 
of commercial development to our dark-skinned brothers of 
the South. M. L. Davis, a representative, wide-awake Ameri- 
can, has just returned from a trip to Mexico, and his stories 
of the growth of that Republic are mpst encouraging. 

"Americans are doing it," he says. "While in Mexico I 
was the guest of Colonel Joseph A. Robertson, who is gen- 
erally conceded to be one of the powers of the land. The 
good he has done Mexico, in a practical way, during the 
past eleven years, is almost beyond measure. He came to 
Monterey in 1888 to build and operate the Monterey and 
Mexican Gulf Railroad, and it was through his almost super- 
human energy that the road was pushed through to Tampico. 
It is due to Colonel Robertson's efforts that manufactur- 
ing was revived in Monterey, and plants established which 
make the town the most important center in the country. 

"Twelve years ago the smoke and puff of commerce were 
unknown in the city of Monterey. To-day the city depends 
on her brick and steel factories, and other plants, the com- 
pleteness of which would do credit to any other city in the 
world. Ninety per cent of the factories in Monterey have 
Colonel Robertson to thank for their being, and his con- 
structive and executive genius make me proud to be a 
Yankee. 



College San Rafael 



For Young Ladies 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Domlnlo 
Pull college course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
trade. Superb modern building:. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. Muslo and art rooms. 

Located In the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and health! uln ess. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San Rafael, Cal. 



H. J. Stewart 



Teacher of Vocal and 
Instrumental Music 1 

Studio : 1406 Van Ness Avenue 



|U1 r\ p. I Q rr p MADAM K LOS8, recently from Now York. 

/M v^ \__) | O I I • lias opened Dressmaking Pnrlors at lioora 25, 

1019 Market street. Sun Francisco. System used 
that took the prize at Paris Exposition. 

LATEST STYLES- PERFECT FIT. 



Ffbruary 2. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



16 



The •plendld engraving of KltlK Brtw»r<1 VII. shown la 
Um » l» from a pholocmph 

takxn of i' mr had Kir 

want. ttnTi Prlnrr of Willi's, all for hlni ranch 

■ ibllahmont Tnln>r standi quite aa high In 
'hi- K'lrop.'an rnpltala ns In the American i that 

his patronage Is as high In London ns In Ban I' 
nttwitf*! bjr the lance collection of portraits of royalty and 
the nobllltr which boar his nrliisive mark. 



Competent teacher will coach pupils in public school studies and 
ii»e lersons to ladiea desiring to improve thcniselTes Apply 

- 

INSURANCE 




p*o*c Comt Dc»a-t »im 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF rREEPORT 



. M.WARD, 

Manager, 

337 PINE STREET. 
San Francisco. Cal 

Phone. Main 5509. 



Fire. IJghtnlne and Tornado Insurance. 

Home Insurance Go. of New York. 

Capital. t3.n00.000 Gross Assets, fl2.908.395 

Surplus to Policy-holders, 17,631 .926 
H, L. Rorr, General Agent: Geo. M. Mttcbkll A. Co., City Agent*. 

210 Sansome St.. S«n Francisco, Cal- 
The Home has a well-organized, competent, and experienced force of Gkn- 
BBAL aitd Special Aokxts resident Id the Pacific Coast States, ensuring 
prompt response to the needs and requirements of Its agents and the Injur- 
ing public, and Immediate Attention to the Adjustment and Pat- 
mirT or Losses 

New Amsterdam Casualty Company 

of New York 

405 Montgomery St.. San Francisco, Cal. 
EnJirsn F.Gbekn, Manager. Jesse W. Lilienthal, Attorney. 

Employers' Liability, Accident. Burglary and Salary Insurance. 

Phenix Insurance Company of Brooklyn, n.y. 

415 MONTGOMERY ST., S. F. 

Capital f 1.000.000 

Surplus 2.520.708 

Assets .- 5,816.560 

GEO. T. WELLINGTON, State Agent for California Oregon, and 
Washington. 

Pacific Coast Underwriting Co. 

Main Office— 507-508-509 Parrott Building, San Francisco. 
Companies Incorporated Bond furnished to guarantee stocks. Oil lands 
And mining properties for sale or lease. 

E. D. CORING, President. 
W. B. BURKOWS. Secretary. 
J. E. FIRMSTONE, Auditor. 



E' 




H Solid 






Secure 




Kt Pbocre*ive ^ 


'*,*■* 
W&M 


&fl£4uC • "'" - - 


jp.THtPACIHCMraJAL 4| 
pf'i .AofCauforSia S 

Mm -Aa&'J 




p-> _t> 


^r^lPHB^O 



The Pacific Mutual 



Life Insurance Co. 

of California 
Organized 1868.) Paid Policyholders. $11,000,000 

Kiloabif & Beavek. General Agents Life Department 
F. W. Vooot, General Agent Accident Department. 
Pacific Mutual Building. S. F. 



f*l»e. MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 
PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 



OF LONDON ENGLAND 



C F. MOLLINS, Manager. 416-418 California street. 8. F. 
FIRB INSURANCE 



Founded A. D. 1792 

Oompany of / lorth Amer 



nsurance Company 



ica 



OF PHILADELPHIA. PEXN. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders .7 $5 022.016 

JAMES D. BALLET. General Agent. 412 California street, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up. $3,446,100 Assets. $24,034,110.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders, $9,612,455.96 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

of New Zealand 
Capital, $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office in company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS. Manager 
Hookee & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

_ Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 
BUTLER & HEWITT. General Agents 413 California street. S. F. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 3,869,451.75 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 2,068,839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital , $6,700,000 

BALFOUR. GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 816 California street, S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 
Capital, $2,250,000 Assets, $10,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Manage 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. 8CHLESINGER, Oity Agent, 304 Montgomery street, San Francisco 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 



I 

1 



\5own Crier 



Hear the Crier? 'hthat the devil art thou 
'One that wilt play the dew I, sir. will; you ' 




Ye keepers of the swell saloons 

With loyal hearts and true, 
Prepare to barricade your doors 

For she is after you. 
Hide all your plain and fancy goods 

And each commercial roast; 
j;or Mrs. Nation, out for gore, 

Is coming to the Coast. 

Already she is marshalling 

Her Christian Temperance band 
And there is blood in every eye, 

A hatchet in each hand; 
And Riteousness' cyclonic breath 

Blows loud at her behest 
To fill with eggs and broken glass 

The breezes of the West. 

As between Prank B. Smith, the Y. M. C. A. spieler, and 
the "bunny hug," the Crier chooses the "immoral and las- 
civious" form of dancing every time. For pure bad taste, 
he is about the yellowest specimen that ever came over 
the road into San Francisco. Most of his talks were "to 
men only" — probably because the authorities of the Y. M. 
C. A. realized that he wasn't fit to be exhibited before women. 
On the only occasion when he did appear before a mixed au- 
dience, he painted a sulphurous picture of the vice and 
degradation of San Francisco, and ended by saying; "I thank 
God to-night that over one-third of my audience are young 
girls, who will never know what I mean!" Fortunately 
we of San Francisco are spared, to a large extent, the visi- 
tation of such people as this Smith. They have them more 
frequently in the Middle West, in the districts where kissing 
games are the standard pastime and the Epworth League 
runs society. These excitors of hysterical religion are to re- 
spectable clergymen what Chris Buckley is to a respectable 
statesman. Their sermons depend upon "goo" and clap- 
trap. With a little personal magnetism and a bit of home 
and mother clipped from the "Inglenook Weekly," they re- 
duce the feeble-minded to a gushing state of emotionalism, 
and then persuade them that it is the working of the Spirit. 
For the Y. M. C. A. variety, a little talk about manliness and 
care of the body is added, to prove that the spieler is a 
"muscular Christians." It is a good trade, though; it pays 
it properly advertised. It is a wonder that more of our un- 
scrupulous young men do not embark on it. 

If it were not for the women and children there would 
probably be very little profit in exhibiting the tawny king of 
the desert behind iron bars at the Chutes zoo. The timid 
dears do so love to quail beneath the resonant roaring of 
Leo before meals, to behold the gory greed of that graceful 
monster as he gnaws the shinbone of a raw cow, licking the 
blood from his paws betimes. The management of the La- 
dies' Home Journal and the management of the Chutes are 
wise in their generation, each using discriminately their 
caged terrors to attract the ladies by centripetal force, as 
it were. At the Chutes it is Wallace, from the wilds of Af- 
rica; in the Ladies' Home Journal it is Theodore Roosevelt 
from the wilds of New York. "Terrible Teddy," fresh from 
the slaughter of San Juan Hill and the carnage of the Colo- 
rado foothills, will be utterly subjugated on paper and will 
pose as a star feature in that eminently respectable family 
resort, the Ladies' Home Journal. It is not the female pa- 
trons, but the management and the animals who are cursed 
with a sense of humor, quoth the Crier. 

It would be unseemly and undignified to state in print 
just what a certain Chicago firm deserves for mixing to- 
bacco with chewing gum, and selling the blend to school- 
children under the name of "gumbaco." May the promoters 
of the enterprise be corraled by the police before falling 
into the hands of a rude and angry public. 



On the evening of the 29th, the ministers of San Francisco 
were gathered together, a flock of shepherds, as it were, 
met together in the company of touts and horsemen, to 
"discuss" the re-opening of Ingleside track. The whole 
scene, of course, was about as practical as most ecclesiasti- 
cal reform measures, and the unsaved of the turf and the 
stables flocked to meeting like farmers to a Smith revival. 
That the race track men acted in their own interests was a 
matter of much surprise to the ministry, but of little wonder 
to the practical layman. The shepherds were as sheep, and 
the sports as the traditional wolf in the fold. When the 
cloth was out-voiced, out-witteo, and out-beaten, the protests 
of the saints were touching to hear. Said Reverend Frank 
K. Baker, with reference to the disaster: "It may seem an 
irreverent comparison, but it was like the trial of Christ be- 
fore Pilate." Certainly, Mr. Baker, we can guess who P. 
Pilot was, but could you throw a little light on just whom 
your brethren, the — er — the other gentlemen represented? 

George D. Shadburne and H. H. Lowenthal, two attorneys, 
chose Judge Sloss' court for the scene of a knock-me-down 
rough-house encounter the other day. The pugilists were 
separated by the clerk and bailiff, and subsequently excused 
from answering for contempt by a good natured court. The 
Crier has not quilled these lines as a news item but rather 
to set a peg whereon to hang a theory which has burdened 
him these many moons. Why should not a meet and proper 
provision be made in our dignified courtrooms, where angry 
attorneys, unsatisfied by vocal abuse, may belabor each other 
decently and in proper place? A roped and sanded arena 
might be arranged at small expense in a convenient ante- 
room, and daily, when debate had reached the swatting- 
point, court might adjourn long enough to enjoy an inter- 
esting bout. Law-suits might be thus settled with despatch 
— and with more than legal intelligence in many cases. 

It would seem that James G. Jones is a new social light of 
some five hundred candle-power brilliance, and it is his duty 
to shine upon the First Friday Cotillion Club, Limited, with 
all the radiance of a new Ward McAllister of San Fran- 
cisco's 40,000. Mr. Jones must positively have things swell 
and, that our younger set in millinery and gent's haber- 
dashery circles may know just where good form ends and 
bad form begins, he has printed a set of rules and regula- 
tions, a clipping from which reads as follows: "We hold 
the term 'evening dress' to mean: For gentlemen, whole 
suit of solid black (frock coat or cutaway), white linen, 
white bow tie. For lady, entire gown of homogeneous ma- 
terial, delicate in tint and texture, though not necessarily 
worn en traine or decollete. Gowns of heavy shade should 
be pronouncedly 'evening' in other respects." As Mr. Jones 
states the object of his club to be the education of the mid- 
dle classes, the Crier would like to be invited to join that 
club, if only to learn how to wear with grace and elegance 
a white lawn tie and a cutaway coat as "evening dress." 

Press me tighter, Willie darling, 

Yet a little tighter please, 
Draw me to your manly shirt-front 

With an Anaconda squeeze. 

Droops my head upon your shoulder — 

Gosh, but you are fitting snug! — 
All because, my dearest Willie, 

You can do the bunny hug. 

Thanks to the courtesy of Mayor Fleischman, Cincinnati 
will have the honor of witnessing the contest between 
Messrs. Jeffries and Ruhlin. Prize-fighters may hardly be 
called an intelligent class, but pugilistic managers are a 
fcxy lot, who can smell a good thing or an easy Mayor from 
afar. Hence Cincinnati as the coming Jeffries-Ruhlin battle- 
ground. 

Although the charitable of our city will organize coffee- 
clubs to supplant saloons, there are few local liquor dealers 
moving stock to Hawaii or the Philippine Islands. 

That William A. E. Moore, just beginning a nine years' 
term in Sing-Siug prison, New York, has fallen heir to 
$125,000, again proves the adage that virtue is its own re- 
ward. 



February 2. 1901. 



.8AN FRANCISCO NCWI LETTER. 



17 



BUBBLES FROM THE SWIM. 

By Lady Algy. 

Society has btwn sadly 

the Duke of ' and his \ 

It was really cruel of Her Qnu a to Indulge In ■ 
However, she ili.l the boat the Could, ami somewhat after 
tbe fashion of the lady of the Ingolds 

She drank nasty medicine without any water. 

Vet looked pleasant like a Duke-and-a Din hess's daughter. 

A few of us were admitted into the ducal preaem e. The 
Duke Is a very informal young man. hut Is mo.-t punctilious 
when addressing his bride. It's "Your Qrace this'' and "Your 
that." His sentences are positively Stick; with 
titled salve: but this rubbing it In probably serves to make 
her think he's worth the price. 

Presumably most American heiresses yearn for a title. 
And on the bargain counter of honors there isn't a better 
title than Duchess." Just as all claret would he Burgundy 
if It could, so all the "My Ladles" would like to be "Her 
Grace." Helena, Duchess of Manchester, horn Zimmerman, 
is to be envied by those in search of titled husbands. For 
there are not many Dukes who are still to be had. The de- 
mand has exhausted the supply. 

The Duchess of Manchester takes to her euphonious title 
like a duck to water or a duke to money. She is thoroughly 
acclimated to being addressed as "Your Grace," but has not 
become steeped in the "airs of a duchess." She has a frank 
wholesome manner that is unaffected and breezy. And the 
Duke, despite his vaunted peccadillos is very likeable. 

In appearance the Duchess reminds me of, of, — well, let me 
see — I really don't believe she has a counterpart in local 
society. She has Anna Voorhies' figure and hair, but there 
the resemblance ceases. Her Grace's eyes, which are gray. 
are distinctly her own, and so are her retrousse nose and 
determined mouth. 

Both the Duke and Duchess paid us some very pretty com- 
pliments. "I haven't been out much," said Her Grace, "but 
I've seen more pretty women than you could find in a week 
elsewhere. And such complexions!" 

"Painted by the Lord!" quoth His Grace. 

Now, just what did he mean by that ? It all depends where 
you put the comma. 

I wonder whether it will now become the rage to plight 
troth with a barking little pup. Are we really going to the 
damnation bow-wows? 

But even if the Duchess of Manchester did choose a dog- 
gie in preference to a solitaire, she is evidently fond of rings, 
for from knuckle to knuckle her fingers were ablaze with 
rings, not only rare and costly, but of curious workmanship. 
A "glad hand" from this Duchess literally makes one blink. 



The Cardans, I have it, are looking for a town house 
But unfortunately the town doesn't happen to be San Fran- 
cisco. They are house-hunting in New York, where they 
purpose spending the winter hereafter. 

There is no use sugar-coating the fact that Mrs. Harriet 
Pullman Carolan did not take rapturously to the people out 
here. She has kept her smiles in cold storage and sheathed 
her nods in icicles. "Oh, very well," said Society, and shrug- 
ged the shoulders of my Lady Disdainful. 

The few friends Mrs. Carolan has made will be genuinely 
sorry that they have not built in San Francisco. However, 
they will still spend the summer at their Burlingame place. 
Mrs. Carolan has finally succeeded in making the men ad- 
dress her husband as "Frank" instead of "Pinkey," which 
she decidedly objected to. It was a hard task, for Carolan 
has been called "Pinkey" ever since he was an apple- 
cheeked boy in knickers. 

Mrs. Grundy has whispered that the Lester ball is being 
given just to show people that the matrimonial bonds have 
not turned into handcuffs. Rumor has insisted that these 
handcuffs were to be severed in court. 

Rubbish and twaddle, say those who know. The cruel re- 
port has no firmer foundation than an indisposition on the 
part of the Lesters to attend society functions. Which ought 



to argue fur ilotl 

ly has reaao 

I of mothers, and by lung 
ln| on 
are the Lester children If Hi- their 

they will some di 
.iful num. Mrs. Walter Hobart 
• • • 

Mrs. Rudolph B neu home li unique in thai each 

in Individuality of Its own that Is perfect In the 

smallest detail. There an- Lonla xiv and Until xv rooms 
i i which n"t a stick of modern furniture is tolerated. Mrs. 

-■is has avoided Juggling all suits of things In the 

room, With the pleasant result thai 1" 

i house Into the usual pot-pourri ol junk, each room 
and in decided contrast to its neighbor. 
The house Is an eloquent sermon on how to do the antique 
and modern home. 

• • • 

Another engagement Is hinted. Tis whispered that lm- 
n ediately after the return of the Prestons from abroad the 
wedding bells will once more chime. 



$100 Reward $100. 
The renders of this paper will be plenaed to learn that there isnt lcn>t on e 
dreaded disease that science has* been able to c rein nil its stages, and 111 it 
I- Catarrh. Mull's Catarrh (.'lire is the only positive cure known to the 
ii fraternity. Catarrh being a oonsUtultonal dlsesse, requires a con- 
stitutional treatment. Hall s Catarrh Cure Is taken Internally, acting 

rl| i calls upon the blood and mucous surfaces of the system, therehy dea- 

Iroylngthel idallonofthe dlBease, and giving the patient strength by 

building up the con-titnlion and assisting nature in doing its work. The 
proprietors have somuch faith in llscuratlve powers, that they offer One 
Hundred Dollars for any ease that it fails to cure. Send lor list of Testi- 
monials. 

Address. F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo. O- 
sir Bold by Druggists. 75c- 

Hall's Family Pills are the best. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Winstow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 




m 



ao» avail sAHSfiM&til 




'lILMHC hnfeancaca 



London Assurance 



Ocean Marine 



Capital Subscribed $4,482,750 

Capital Paid Up 2,241,375 

Assets 19,195,145 

Capital Subscribed $5,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 500,000 

Assets 2,502,050 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide. 

RESTAURANTS. 

POODLE DOG Restaurant, N. B. corner Eday and Mason Sts.. 
Private dining and banquet rooms. Telephone, Main 429. 

A. B. Blanco & B. Bran. 

BAT STATE OYSTER HOUSE AND GRILL. ROOM, 16 Stock- 
ton street and 109 O'Parrell street. N. M. Adler, Proprietor. 
Telephone, Main 5057. 

BERGEZ REbTAUR ANT— Rooms for ladies and families. Pri- 
vate entrance. Academy Building, 332-334 Pine street, below 
Montgomery. John Bergez, Proprietor. 

NEVADA RESTAURANT, 126-130 Geary street. Private rooms 

for parties. 'Phone, Main 1179. Noel P. Loupy, Proprietor. 

MAISON TORTONI, French Rotisserie, 111 O'Farrell streut. 
Private dining rooms; banquet hall. S. Constantini, Pro- 
prletor. 

HOTELS. 

PALACE AND GRAND HOTELS— Connected by overhead pas- 
sageway; under one management. Palace Grill Rooms a fea- 
ture. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL— a quiet home centrally located; flrst- 

class. Wm. B. Hooper, Manager. 
RUSS HOUSE— J. S. Young, Proprietor. Leading business and 

family hotel. 

POSTAGE STAMP DEALERS. 

W. P. GREANY, 827 Brannan street. Selections on approval; any 

place in the world. 

BOILER MAKERS. 

P. F. DUNDON'S San Francisco Ironworks, 314-316-3*8 Main 
street. Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 




ocieiy 



^— 




■«mJ 



With so many dances on the tapis one can scarcely wonder 
at the joyous remark made by one of the season's buds the 
other day: "Why, my head fairly swims when I think of them 
all," and even the more seasoned belles confess themselves 
to be in a quiver of excitement. The hop at the Presidio 
last Friday evening is conceded to have been the most de- 
lightful of the season, though as a rule that is the usual 
verdict given after each of these most popular dances. The 
number of belles from town was larger than usual and of the 
beaux there were more than enough to go round. Several 
dinners preceded the dance, among the pleasantest being 
Mrs. Baker's, where were entertained the Misses Delia Mills, 
Leontine Blakeman, and Charlotte Ellinwood, Lieutenant 
Bruce, Dr. Collins, and Mr. Raymond. 

At the dance given by the Misses Gibbons last Thursday 
evening the guests were exclusively young people, and it was 
a very merry gathering. Miss Sophie Pierce was the cotil- 
lion leader at the Friday Fortnightly dance last night. 

There will be a goodly attendance at the Mount Zion ball 
to-night, as the sale of tickets has been very large, and every- 
thing has been done by the lady managers to ensure success. 
Both Maple and Marble Halls at the Palace will be open for 
dancing, and supper will be served at small tables in the ad- 
joining dining room. 

Next week's dances include the Hobart reception and La 
Jeunesse ball. This has been a week of luncheons, and at a 
number of them the two most popular buds of the season 
were guests of honor. The hostesses included Mrs. Augus- 
tus Taylor on Monday; Mrs. Horace Pillsbury, and Miss Ber- 
tie Bruce on Tuesday; Mrs. Irwin and Mrs. Hort on Wednes- 
day; Mrs. Ed Dimond on Thursday; and Miss Therese Mor- 
gan yesterday, her guest of honor being Miss Sophie Pierce. 
The guests at the luncheon given last Friday by Miss Fran- 
ces Baldwin at the University Club was a happy mingling 
of belles married and single, including the Misses Sawyer, 
OIlie Holbrook, Sophie Pierce, Mary Stubbs, Ethel Cooper, 
Juliet Garber, Ida Belle Palmer, Berny Drown, Mrs. Fred 
Magee, Mrs. Alex Baldwin, and Mrs. Aleck Keyes. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter L. Dean have of late been extensively 
entertained at dinners by their friends. Allan Bowie was 
among the first to dine them last week; on Monday last 
Ed Sheldon gave one of his famous little dinners, at which 
the guests were Mr. and Mrs. Dean, Mrs. Detrick, Mr. and 
Mrs. Winslow, Allan Bowie, and Donald de V. Graham. 

On Thursday Mrs. Oxnard gave a dinner of fourteen, and 
Mrs. J. L. Flood was also a dinner hostess on the same day. 
Mrs. George Pope's dinner yesterday was in honor of the 
bride and groom elect, Miss Edna Hopkins and Will Taylor. 
Her guests numbered a score or more, including members of 
the two families, and the forthcoming bridal attendants. 
Mrs. Henry Allen, who last month gave such a pleasant tea 
for the debut of her daughter, Miss Frances, was hostess 
at a dinner she gave yesterday in honor of her new daughter- 
in-law, Mrs. Wyatt Allen, neS Alysse Latham. 

"At homes" have filled a large space in the doings of the 
swim during the past two weeks. Friday last was especially 
well filled with receptions, those of the Van Wycks, Mrs. 
Follis, Mrs. George Martin, Mrs. W. L. Herrin, Mrs. Casey, 
and Miss Dillon. Yesterday Mrs. Ira Pierce and Miss Sophie 
held their first at home for the reception of their recent 
tea calls; Mrs. E. P. Danforth's card just issued announces 
that she will be at home on Tuesdays in February. 

U. S. Minister to Japan Buck and Mrs. Buck were the re- 
cipients of many polite attentions during their brief visit 
to San Francisco, and left here with much regret. They were 
the guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Valentine at luncheon on 
Tuesday, and in the afternoon Mrs. O. E. Wood gave a recep- 
tion in honor of Mrs. Buck in the parlor of the Occidental. 
The room was prettily adorned with accacia blooms, and be- 
tween the hours of four to six was thronged with visitors, 
among whom were the wives and daughters of the army and 



navy officers stationed in San Francisco, and many ladies 
well known in our social circles. Mr. and Mrs. Buck left for 
the East on Wednesday. 

Mrs. F. L. Whitney made her re-entree as a hostess since 
her recent return from abroad at the buttercup tea given by 
her last Saturday, those pretty flowers of spring being 
chiefly in evidence among the others that decked the rooms". 
Among her assistants were the Misses Polly Dunn, Maye 
Colburn, Edith Mills, Eugenie Hawes, and Florence Bailey. 

The Japanese tea at the rooms of the Sketch Club last 
Saturday afternoon was a great success, and from three to 
five o'clock they were crowded with guests, who were lav- 
ish in their admiration of the beautiful Japanese brocades 
with which the walls were hung and the many curios which 
were displayed. Refreshments were served by Japanese 
maids in gorgeous native costumes, who also gave several se- 
lections of Japanese music during the afternoon. 

Sunday teas, which were such a fad a season or two back, 
have fallen into a state of comparative neglect, being the ex- 
ception both last season and this. The first one this winter 
was given by the Misses Cole, who asked a few of their girl 
friends to meet the Messrs. Crimmins, who came to attend 
the recent wedding, and who were kind enough to declare 
San Francisco to be "the most awfully jolly place on the 
American continent." 

The wedding of Miss Bessie Foote and Stanley Jackson, 
which, following very closely upon the announcement of 
their engagement, took place on Thursday afternoon of last 
week at the Foote residence on Brush street, Oakland, was 
u very quiet affair owing to recent affliction in the families 
of both bride and groom. The Rev. W. C. Shaw tied the nup- 
tial knot in the presence of relatives and a few very inti- 
mate friends. 

Mrs. Grundy is whispering that there are two more en- 
gagements in the Preston family, but they are not likely to 
take the public into their confidence for some time. One of 
the fortunate youths is now Manilaward, and the other — but 
no, I won't even drop a hint. 

Quite a number of San Francisco maidens have been lured 
away to Honolulu the past year, and the departure to-day of 
Miss May Taylor adds another to the list, as upon her arri- 
val there she will become the bride of Fred Beardsley, and 
make her future home in that "Paradise of the Pacific." 
The fair bride elect was accompanied by her mother, Mrs. 
T. G. Taylor, who will return here after the wedding. The 
engagement of Miss Maud Magee and Hunter Harrison is 
among the most recently announced. Gossip insists the 
Swim will soon be called upon to congratulate Miss Alice 
Sprague and Clarence Follis. 

"No masks for the men" is the final decision of the Mardi 
Gras ball managers, and though it is contended that there- 
by the ball will be lacking in brilliancy, it is generally ad- 
mitted the decision is a wise one. That it will be well 
attended is already an assured fact, and both maids and 
young matrons are busily engaged in getting up something 
quite stunning in which to appear on that eventful night. 

Mrs. Milly Ashe Sewell is visiting her mother, Mrs. C. L. 
Ashe, at her residence on Sacramento street, having arrived 
from the East last week; Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Flood have re- 
turned from their visit to Kansas. 



A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 

Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Moth Patches, Bash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish on beauty, 
and defies detection. It has stuod the 
test of 51 years and Is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of simitar name. 
Dr. L. A. Sayre Bnid to a lady of the 
haut-ton (a patient): "As youMadies 
will use them. I recommend 'Oour* 
aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
hy all drusrirists and Fanoy-Koods 
Dealers in the United States. Canada* 
and Europe. 

FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. 
87 Great Jones street, N. Y. 




r«bm»ry 2, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



19 



The Manchester duc«l party nittml acroM our Tl»lon this 
week, the Illness of Her Qtaca caoatnf Ihi 

tkt forty-eight boon to whlih It hn d 
limited. They are at present enjoying lhs dellghta 
Monte. 

Mrs. Walter Dean and thr cer, who held tl 

of their receptions y.-slerdny. nre c ontem plating 
on to San Diego. Mrs. and Miss XI making a 

short visit to Coronado. 

Winter Is merging Into spring most of the 1 
Monte and the large list of fashionable guests al 
ettest to the fact that the season at that delightful 
one of the longest In the world. It has become quite the 
thing for the smart set. not only in California, but all over 
the country to winter at the Hotel Del Monte. 

Miss Jenny Flood left for the East last Saturday for a 
few weeks' visit in Gotham; Miss Juliet Crosby accompanied 
Miss Flood in her private car; Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Drown and 
family left during the week for a trip to Europe. 

The cards are out for the Hopkins-Taylor wedding, which 
will be celebrated at the Hopkins villa at Menlo Park on 
Tuesday, February 12th. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cheesebrough have taken up their residence 
at the Hotel Plymouth for a short time prior to occupying 
their new residence on Broadway. 

George Hammersmith, previous to his departure for New 
York, will be tendered a testimonial at Native Son's Hall on 
the evening of Thursday, February 7th. Mr. Hammersmith 
will appear in character impersonations, songs and recita- 
tions, and will be assisted by Mrs. J. E. Birmingham, William 
J. Haynes, Miss Jean Durrell, Miss Millie Flynn, Sig. J. F. 
Veaco, Hazel Callaghan, Harry Wood Brown, Miss Ruby 
Dawson, and the Knickerbocker Quartette. The affair is 
under the patronage of the following clubs: California, 
Western Addition, Darina Parlor, I. O. O. F., Forum, Ver- 
monters, Stanford Parlor, Eastern Star, Olympic, National 
Union, Entre Nous, and Y. M. I. 

You might enjoy a flower carnival on Christmas or New 
Years day at San Rafael, for the blossoms are perennial in 
that favored clime. This accounts perhaps for the large 
number of prominent San Franciscans who prefer to take 
a few minutes' ferry ride across the bay every winter to 
stop awhile at the Hotel Rafael, among the Marin hills. 



WHY THE WOMEN FLOCK TO CAILLEAU'S. 

It is a notable fact that the annual sales of Armand Cail- 
leau are events to those of San Francisco who pay any at- 
tention to shopping. Whenever he announces that he will 
have a sale at reduced prices, the public knows that he 
means business, and from the time the Cailleau establish- 
ment opens in the early morning until it is closed at night 
the public is there in a jam and a pack. The annual reduc- 
tion sale of cloaks, jackets, boas, skirts, waists, tailor-made 
gowns and imported costumes, was commenced yesterday, 
and the crowd in Kearny street opposite the White House 
was thronging for Cailleau's. It is a mistake for dealers 
not to recognize the fact that the shopper has a good sense 
of values. When Cailleau cuts his prices, as he has done for 
the present sale, the public, realizing the value of his wares, 
flocks to his establishment by the hundreds. The name Cail- 
lau stands for the best that is made in the line of waists, 
wraps and suits. The wise shoppers realize that one of his 
bargain sales is like the sale of United States currency 
at half its face value. Therefore they crowd the counters, 
and first come is first served. • Bargain day or no bargain 
day, Cailleau's goods are first-class in every particular. He 
has no use for cheap wares, and sells only the garments 
that are modern, modish, and stylish, and will be a legiti- 
mate advertisement for his business. The sale that opene* 
yesterday is simply a repetition of those that have yearly 
characterized the establishment, and of the goods that have 
made the firm's reputation one of the stoutest in the west. 
The sale will continue for the coming two weeks. 



Miss Mullallaly, the popular tailoress and dressmaker, has 
removed her establishment to rooms on the fourth floor, 
No. 14 Grant avenue. Her creations are chic, stayish and 
artistic, and a schedule of moderate prices add to her 
popularity. 



Crosse <$t Blackwell 

Purveyors to the Queen 




Received the 

Grand Prix 

highest possible Award 

For Pickles, Sauces, Malt Vinegar, 
Jams, Potted Meats, etc., 

at the 

PARIS EXHIBITION 1900. 

The San Francisco 
Jockey Club. 

Third meeting from! Monday, January 21, to Saturday, Feb. 9, Inclueive 

AT TANFORAN PARK, 

Six races each day including Hurdle races and Steeplechases. 

The Winter Handicap, Saturday, January 26, 

The Washington Park Handicap, Wednesday, Jan. 30. 

The Eclipse Stakes. Saturday, February 2. 

The Ah-xandra Park Handicap, Wednesday, Feb. 6. 

The California Oaks, Saturday, February 9. 
Trains leave Third and Townsend streets for Tanforan Park at 7, 10:45, 
11:31) a. m., 12:30, 1, 1:30 and 2 p. m. Valencia stree' 5 minutes later. Trains 
returning to the city at 4:15 p, m„ and immediately after the last race. 
Admission to the grounds, including railroad fare, 81.25. 

SPECIAL — The 2 p. m. is for the convenience of those not wishing to 
reach the track in time for the first race. 

Milton S. Latham, Secretary. 



FELIX'S ROT1SSER1E, 

Felix Gouailnardou, proprietor, (formerly with 

Jack's Eotisserie), 537 California street, below 

Kearny. Private rooms for families and banquets 

Telephone Black 2906 




H. Isaac Jones, M. D. 



Eye. Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office— 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 
streets, S. F. Hours, 10 a. m. to 4. p. in. 



Sunday by appointment. 



Tel. Grant 101. 



Worthington Ames 

flember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker in Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Sale Deposit Building. 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1381 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Obooehb BatLDTNG San France 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 




Stolen From Thieves. 

The famous composer sat in an orchestra chair, and lis- 
tened to the comic opera of his rival. As the chorus roared 
out a swinging, familiar air, the tears started to the great 
musician's eyes. "Ah," he said, sadly, "I would not have 
believed it, but he has stolen a march on me." To those 
familiar with his works, the truth of this remark would have 
been apparent. 

"You don't seem to be very sorry about it," remarked 
the citizen after the trolly accident. "No, I ain't as nervous 
as I was," replied the motorman; "this is my third to-da"." 
"Your third victim? Great Heavens!" "Yes; the second one 
made me nervous, but there's luck in odd numbers, you 
know." 

"Why isn't Bunker on the links this morning?" "He's over 
at the church getting married." "Well, I can say one thing, 
Bunker will never make anything but a duffer so long as he 
lets every trifling social engagement keep him from going 
the rounds twice a day." 

"I see that Jerry began his married life on the principle 
that two can live as cheaply as one!" "What was the first 
thing he did?" "Sat for a 'group' photo with his wife, since 
he found the price was the same whether there were two 
or one in the picture." 

Two ears and but a single tongue. 
By Nature's choice to man belong; 
The inference you have is clear; 
Repeat but half of what you hear. 

"What a queer, unpractical man Brown is." "What's he 
done now?" "Well, he says we ought to all come away from 
China and let the Chinese solve their problem for them- 
selves, and adds that in that way it will be their funeral, 
while if we stay there it's apt to become ours." 

Lady — Well, what do you want? Tramp — Leddy, believe 

me, I'm no ordinary beggar. I was at the front Lady 

(with interest)- — Really Tramp — Yes'm; but 1 couldn't 

make anybody hear, so I came around to the back. 

"But why is it?" asked the thoughtful Chinese, "that I 
may go to your heaven, while I may not go to your country?" 
The American missionary shrugged his shoulders. "There 
is no labor vote in heaven!" said he. 

Casey— Sure, Cassidy is an utter failure, socially! He 
lacks the gift of repartay intoirely! Callahan — He does thot! 
After he's called a mon a liar he hoz totally exhausted his 
bon-mots. 

Visitor — What's become of old Sam Bungs? Longshoreman 
Billy — Dead, sir — died of 'art disease. A visitor gave him a 
shillin' very sudden. My 'art's werry strong, sir. 

Lady — And you just eke out a scanty existence, do you? 
Dusty Rhodes — Yes'm. Won't you please help me to eke? 

Old Maid — Is this a smoking-compartment, young man? 
Obliging Passenger — No, mum; 'igher up! 

First Boy — Your little baby brother hasn't any hair. Sec- 
ond Boy — No; the doctor what brought bim was bald. 

A melancholy illustration of the rapidity with which sound 
travels is afforded by the spread of the average popular 
song. 



BANKING 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Capital, 82.000.000- 
Surplus and Undivided ProfilB. January 1. 1901, $3,564,170.(6. 

WILLIAM ALVORD President! CHARLES R. BISHOP, Vlee-Pres't 

ALLBN M. CLAY Secretary THOMAS BROWN Cashier 

S. PRENTISS SMITH Ass't Cashier \ I. F. MOULTON 2d Ase't Cashier 

CORRESPONDENTS 

New York— Messrs. Laldlaw &. Co.; the Bank of New York, N. B. A. 
Baltimore — The National Exchange Bank. Boston — National Shawmut 
Bank. Chicago— Illinois Trust and Savings Bank; First National Bank. 
Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Bank. St. Louis— Boatman's Bank. 
Virginia City. Nev.— Agency of The Bank of California. London— Messrs 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Paris— Messrs. de Rothschild Freres. Berlin- 
Direction der Dlsconto Gesellschaft. China, Japan, and East Indies — Char- 
tered Bank of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand — The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd., and Bank of New Zealand. 

Letters of credit Issued available In all parU of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET. S. P. 

Deposits July 1. 1900. 826.952.875 Reserve Fund $218,593 

Paid-up Capita] 1,000,000 Contingent Fund. 439.608 

E. B. POND, President W. C. B. DePREMERY, Vice-President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 

Directors — Henry F. Allen, Thomas Blnuree. W. C. B. de Fremery, C. O. 
G. Miller, Robert Watt, Georee C. Boardinan, Daniel E. Martin. Jacob 
Baith, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
landsin the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be made In checks payable 
In San Francisco. Post Office, or Wells Fareo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. in., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 



It isn't pleasant to unfold a tie or a suit of clothes 

with the expectation of wearing it and find that it has been 
disfigured by an ugly spot or stain. Why don't you send 
your things to Spaulding's Cleaning and Dyeing Establish- 
ment, 127 Stockton street, tind be a well dressed and happy 
man in the future. Spaulding also cleans gloves, tapestries, 
laces and curtains. 



If connoisseurs could get anything as good as G. H. 

Mumm's brand of champagne, perhaps they would keep 
other kinds on their sideboards. As it is Mumm's wines are 
in exclusive use in the best hotels, cafes and clubs. 



Wells Fargo X< Co. Bank 

N. E. Cob. Sansohe and Sutteb Sts. 
JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KINO. Manager F. L. LIPMAN, Assistant Cashier 

H, L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Capital. Surplus and Undivided Profits Dec. 31,1900 $8,620,223.88 

Branches— New York City. H. B. Parsons, Cashier; Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly. Cashier: Portland. Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Christeson, Oliver Eldrldge, 

Henry E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, 

John Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82,263,559.17 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000 000 00 

Deposits Dec. 31. 1900 .29.589.864.13 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
DAnlel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman; Cashier, A, H. R 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; General Attorney. W. S. Goodiellow. 

Ign. Stolnhart. E. Rohte H. B. Russ, N Ohlandt. John Lloyd, and I. N 
Walter. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000,000. pAld Up Capital 8300.000 

James D. Phelan, President S. G. Mubpht, Vice-President fl 

Geobge A. Stoby, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— James D. Phelan, S. G. Murphy. John A. Hooper, James 
Moffitt. Frank J. Sullivan, Robert McElroy, Chas. S. Neal. James M. 
McDonald. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 

Deposits may be sent by postal order. Welts. Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

Continental Building X< Loan Association 

Established In 1889. OF CAUFORNIA 
SubHcrlbed Capita!.. 810.000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..8210,000 
Paid-in-Capital 1,500,000 . Monthly Income, over 100.000 

Its Pdbpose is to help Its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first Hens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent. Interest on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing Interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office— 222 SanBome St., 8an Francisco. Cal. 

Wm. Cobbin, Secretary and General Manager 

Crocker-Woolvvorth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market. Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital tl.000 000 

Wm. H. Cbockeb. President Geo. W. Klinh, Cashier 

W E. Brown. Vice-President W. Gregg. Jb„ A»«1«t*nt Oa*hlor 

D'rectors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond. W. R Brown. C. E. Green, G. W. 
Kline HenryJ. Crocker. G. W. Scott. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

71 



21 



THAT FLIRT OF A FALL-WIND. 

i y llary K'ii. .it it 
Th>' Fall-Wind whispered something, 

by, 
And the cheeks of trees Bushed scarlet, 
Those thai were young and shy. 

While some — tin- grave duennas, 
With cheeks like yellow gold. 

Accused the Wind of boldness. 
But these, you se... wen — old. 

And the fathers of the forest 
Turned purple in their rage, 

At the Fall-Wind's youthful folli- 
So Intolerant is age. 

Hut the Wind— he just laughed softly. 
And pressed, like a lover sly. 

A kiss on the young trees' burning cheeks. 
And then went Hitting by. 



THE TEST OF HOPE. 

By Por.i Reed *• 1 il»- 

Hope will in at the key-hole, 

So spirit-small is she; 
She enters soft at dead of night 

When Grief has turned the key. 

I too have thought her banished, 
But still, as daylight beams, 

Find she has kissed me while I slept 
And made me hers in dreams. 



LET ME FORGET. 

Theodosia Pickering Garrison in Cosmopolitan, 
Love, who hath granted many prayers and set 

My wayward feet into thy happy ways, 
Behold, I send thee supplication yet — 

Let me forget my wasted yesterdays. 

I wrought so many follies in thy name. 
So many frail, false altars did I raise, 
Too weak to hold thee — nay, for very shame, 
Let me forget my wasted yesterdays. 

See, I blot out my sinning with my tears. 

And ever cry my prayer with this my praise; 

For sake of all the coming, happier years 
Let me forget my wasted yesterdays. 



LOVE. 
Collier's Weekly. 
Because I love thee, I can stay 
Silent beside thee half a day. 

Because I fully comprehend 

Thy moods and inner thought, my' friend, 

I have no need for look or speech; 

Thy soul through space my own can reach. 

Should seas and lands between us lie, 
The steadfast stars still burn on high, 

And while they light their lamps of flame 
Thy love and mine were yet the same. 

Because I love thee, I can stay 
Content, though thou art far away. 



SONG. 

By Robert Loveman in Harper's Moil hly Magazine- 
Over the sea we go, 

Over the sea of life. 
Past reefs of war.' ■.' . woe, 

Through blinking legs of strife. 

O happy sea and wind, — 

Soon, soon, wj shall forget 
The islands far behind, 

Those islands of regret. 



London and San Francisco Bank, u-iaai 

i.i i \t ITORITU -tim:kt. 
iif \n OPPD I Bdon, 

Capital Authorize. I. lj..vin.noo. Paid r,,. Ji.iun.nm. 

DlraxHom n i. Chairman, London; Charles HdwaM Blather 

moon: Christian da tJiiigoo. Ban Prenot ; Charles Re 

London: John t . Howard. Ban Pnumlaoo; BemHi KoppaJ, I»ndon: Nor- 
man l». Itt.i, t. Ban I riimr Bonvener, Londott, 

InapaOtnt Of Branches. tin. lav Frledorloh. 
Agent* In Now York. If atua, J, P. Morgan A ''". 

BRANOHBB: Portland. Oregon: Taooma, Washington. 

letter, of credit leaned ftvHllatile for traveler* and the purchase of iner- 

onendles In any city ol las world Deal In [orelon and domestic exchange 
ointry hanks received. Terms on epDlieatloa, 

W, Mai KlflTOeaT, Manager 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

With which is amalgamated The Bank of British Columbia 

HEAD OFFICE-Toroiilo. 

Paid Up Capital. SS.OfJO.000. Bcscrve Fund. S2.H00,O00. 

Aggregate Resources, over 865,000,000. 

Hon Geo. A. Cox. President: B- E. Walker. General Manager. 

J. H. Plummer. Asst. General Manager- 

LONDON OPPICB— 60 I miihnrd St.. E- C. S. Cameron Alexander, Manager 

NF.W YORK OFFICE— 10 Exchange Place, Alex. Laird and Wm. Gray. 

Agent*. 
ONTARIO: 41 BRANCHES- 

Queheo: Montrca': Manitoba: Winnipeg: Yukon District: 
Dawson. White Horse: British Columbia: Atlin. Cranbrook. Fernie, 
Greenwood, Kaodoons. Nanalmo. Nelson. New Westminster, Rossland. 
Sainton. Vancouver. Victoria. In the Untted States— New York, N. Y. San 
Fiancisoo. Cal. Seattle, Wash. Portland, Ore. Skagway. Alaska- 
Bunkers in London — The Bank of Scotland; Messrs. Smith. Payne & Smiths 
Bankers in New York— The American Exchange National Bank, 
Agents in Chicago — The Northern Trust Company. Agents In New Orleans- 
—The Commercial National B*nk. 
San Francisco Office: Walter Powell, Manager. A. Kalns, Asst. Manager 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cob. Sansome and Suttee Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 Pald-Up Capital, 82,000,000 

Reserve Fund, 8925,000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York— Aeency of the London, Paris and American Bank. 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 
Boulevard Poissonlere. Draw direot on the prinolpat cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

9IG. GREENEBAUM. C. ALTSCHUL, Managers. 
R. ALTSCHTJL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco. 
JA8. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, 8500,000 

DIRECTORS-James K. Wilson, Wm. J. Dutton, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo 
A. Pope, H. E. Huntington, Henry Pierce, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS : New York—Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago—Continental National Bank. St. Louts 
—The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris—Morgan, Harjes &. Co, 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital. 81,000,000 Pald-Up Capital and Reserve, 8390,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on tkust deposits and savings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Officers— F. Kronenberg, President; W- A- Frederlok, vIce-Presldent; H. 
Brnnner. Cashier 

Board of Directors— F. Kronenberg. W. A. Frederick, Fred A. Kuhls, E, 
A, Denicke, A. G. Wieland. Fred Woerner, J. O. Rued, Fred O. Siebe 
John Rapp. 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cob. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. O. 



Capital Authorized 86.000.000 

Subscribed 3,000.000 



Paid Up 81.500.000 

Reserve Fund... 700,000 



Agents at New York— J. & W. Sellgman & Co., 21 Broad street. 

The bank transacts a ireneral banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion 

IGN. STELNHART, P. N. LTT.TENTHAL. Managers. 



Security Savings Bank 



222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 



Interest paid on deposits. Loans made. 

DIRECTORS, 

William Alvord S. L. Abbot, Jr. 

William Ttahcook O. D. Baldwin 

Adam Grant W.'S. Jones 



H. H, Hewlett 
E. J. MoCutchen 
R. H. Pease 



22 

' I V HE continual breaking of 
lamp-chimneys costs a 
good deal in the course of a 
year. 

Get Macbeth' s "pearl top" 
or "pearl glass." You will 
have no more trouble with 
breaking from heat. You will 
have clear glass instead of 
misty ; fine instead of rough ; 
right shape instead of wrong; 
and uniform, one the same as 
another. 

Our "Index" describes att lamps and their 
pr.iptr chimneys. With it you can always "rder 
the right size and shape of chimney /or any 'amp 
We mail it FREE to any one who writes for iu 

Address Maceeth, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ilncle Lilly's fflevenge 



"A flock of geese may have saved 
Rome," said the old granger reflec- 
tively; "that was before my time and 
I wouldn't want to swear to it, but I'll 
take my oath it was the antics of a 
flock of drunken geese that lost Amos 
Hoskins his election as Sheriff of an 
Iowa county. Although, of course, the 
cunning of Uncle Billy Wilson had a 
good deal to do with the result. 

"Amos was a good farmer in some 
ways, but live stock, and especially 
the failings of fat geese was not his 
long suit. When it came to local poli- 
tics, though, the old man was there 
with the glad hand and an energetic 
hustle. Iowa was a Prohibition State 
in those days, and the county in which 
Amos lived was dryer than a lime kiln. 
So, as it drew near election, Araos's 
enthusiastic hurrahs in favor of cold 
water grew louder and more continued. 

A few days before election Uncle 
Billy Wilson dropped over to Amos's 
place. Uncle Billy didn't have strong 
views on the temperance question, but 
he was at all times and in all places 
an ardent advocate of Billy Wilson's 
right to anything which wasn't 
chained. 

" 'And after you are elected,' said 
Uncle Billy, persuasive-like in the 
course of the conversation, 'don't you 
think you will be able to see your way 
clear to appointing me a deputy? I've 
always been a good friend of yours.' 

"Well, Amos didn't see it that way 
at all. Uncle Billy might be a friend 
of his all right but he hadn't done any 
strong hustling for the benefit of Amos 
Hoskins. This was the truth, for with- 
in a few days Uncle Billy had thought 
the other side stood the best chance 
of winning. Anyhow, Amos said, all 
the places of deputy-sheriffs had al- 
ready been promised. 

"Uncle Billy didn't say much to 
this, but it was plain he was doing a 
heavy stunt of thinking. He kept his 



Dunlop Pneumatic Tires 

? V tiff \ "■ ,0r tSar, '' aacs 

■ ( I ' 1 % for Automobiles 



The American Dunlc 
llelleville. N.J. I'll 
/ 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

temper, though, and little by little 
brought the talk around to the subject 
of geese, of which Amos had a big 
flock. It was the first season Amos 
had raised geese, and while he thought 
the world of his flock, he had a good 
deal to learn about their habits. And 
Uncle Billy was right there to teach 
him. 

"Those are likely-looking geese," 
said Uncle Billy, reflectively; 'but 
somehow it don't seem to me that they 
are as fat as they might be. Have 
you ever tried feeding them on pump- 
kin seeds? If there is any one thing 
that gladdens the heart of the average 
Iowa goose it is pumpkin seeds.' 

"Amos said that he had never 
thought of pumpkin seeds as goose 
food. In fact, he hadn't raised any 
pumpkins that year, and it would be 
quite an expense to buy them so late 
in the season. 

" 'Why, that will be all right,' ans- 
wered Uncle Billy, cheerfully. 'I've 
got lots of them on my farm, and they 
are no use to me. I'll send my boy 
over with a load in the morning.' 

"Somewhere in an old book," con- 
tinued the old granger reminiscently, 
"I once read about fearing the Greeks 
even when they were bringing gifts. 
Not that there was any Greek blood 
in Uncle Billy Wilson, but that saying 
applied in this case all right. ..If Amos 
had had any common sense he would 
have known that Uncle Billy wasn't 
offering pumpkin seeds to the Hoskins 
geese out of pure loving kindness, and 
he just having been turned down in 
his application for deputy sheriff. And 
if Amos had known anything about 
goose nature he would have known 
that while geese dote on pumpkin 
seeds the effect on them is the same 
as that of good whisky on a man — 
an entangling of the feet and a subse- 
quent enlargement of the head. 
But Amos being ignorant on both these 
points, just thanked Uncle Billy and 
said that if he sent over the pumpkin 
seeds both Amos and the geese would 
look on him as a public benefactor. 

"Uncle Billy having laid the foun- 
dations for his goose-jag plot piked 
right back to the village and bunted 
up Elder Benton. The elder was a 
warm supporter of Amos, but the chief 
end and aim of the elder's life was the 
suppression of booze-made hilarity. 

" 'It's too bad about Amos Hoskins, 
isn't it?' said Uncle Billy in sorrowful 
tones. 

"The elder didn't particularly ap- 
prove of Uncle Billy, so at first he 
replied, sort of tart-like that he didn't 
know anything out of the way with 
Amos Hoskins, in fact his life was 
more to be approved of than that 
of some other persons who weren't 
so very far away at the present time. 
Then his curiosity being aroused, he 
inquired of Uncle Billy the particular 
reason why there was any condolence 
coming to Amos Hoskins. 'I always 
considered him a good and worthy 
man,' added the elder firmly. 

" 'I was told yesterday,' replied Un- 
cle Billy in his most doleful tones, 
'that Amos had so much whisky in the 
bouse that he couldn't use it all up. 
and had to feed it to his geese. I 
wouldn't have believed it, though, if 
I hadn't seen it with my own eyes. 
Wasting good whisky and corrupting 
innocent geese, and he a candidate 
on the Prohibition ticket!' added Uncle 
Billy indignantly. 

"The elder said that it must be a 
slander, some campaign lie, that he 
couldn't believe such a thing of Amos 



February 2, 1901. 

I $ 

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;:: 



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to measure, of cloth, lining 
and style selected by cus- 



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etc., etc. 

We Sell 

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by the Yard 

A good mer- 
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in every town 
to take our 
agency. Write 




8 STANDARD LADIES' TAILORING CO. !£! 



'& 266-268 Franklin St., Chicago. 



Hoskins. Uncle Billy was mighty in- 
dignant at having his word doubted. 

" 'I wouldn't slander any man, not 
even a Prohibitionist,' he said in hurt 
tones. 'You can go down to Amos's 
house to-morrow morning, elder, and 
if the degrading and disgusting sight 
don't make you close your eyes, you 
will see that flock of geese rolling 
about in blind intoxication.' 

"The next morning shortly after 
daybreak, Uncle Billy sent over his 
boy to Amos Hoskins's place with a 
couple of bushels of pumpkin seeds. 
He told the boy to tell Amos to feed 
the seeds to the geese as soon as possi- 
ble, as the geese liked them for an ear- 
ly breakfast. So Amos hurried out 
to the barnyard, called all his geese 
together, and scattered nearly a bushel 
of the seeds on the ground. Well, 
pumpkin seeds were just what those 
geese had been vainly longing for 
They piled right into their new feed. 
Being full-grown geese, in good condi- 
tion, it was some time before the 
pumpkin seeds began to show results. 
But after they got their work in there 
was no complaint about lack of re- 
sults coming either from Amos, Uncle 
Billy or the geese. First a respecta- 
ble goose, the mother of a large fam- 
ily, tried to dance the goose equivalent 
for the can-can. Her condition being 
too wobbly for this she fell over in the 
dust, waving her webbed feet and 



EVERY WOMAN 

is interested an 1 ' should know 

jout the wonderful 

MARVEL WpW 

The new Vaginal Syringe. 
'njection and Suction, 
Best— Safest— Most Con- 
venient. It CleuDses 
Instantly. 

Ask your druggist for It. 
ii lie i nnnot ■ upplj 111 
MARVEL, accept no 
other, but send stump for llrua, 

Imled l k — mciiIpiI. It etves tutt 

parti i ulara ami rMiw Hon* In 
to) idle- MA II VEX < o.. 

593 Mission street, San Francisco, Cal. 




February 2, 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




trt xncM roi 

< onehs, t ol<K 
A-t Imiii. M— thltlBi 

lIo;ir»l'lli»s, 

and Sore Throat. 



M. 



ry /u* 



.//■ 



squawking dismally The heat gan- 
der looked at her (or a minute In sol- 
emn disgust and then a sudden im- 
pulse to try and fly over the barn 
seized him. When he made the at- 
tempt he fell on his head, and after 
trying to stand on It. subsided Into a 
bibulous slumber. Every member of 
the once-respectable flock was in a 
more or less, principally more, intoxi- 
cated condition. It was a regular goose 
orgy. 

"While Amos was looking in per- 
plexed amazement at the geese a dele- 
gation of the principal Prohibitionists 
of the country, headed by Elder Ben- 
ton, entered the yard. The sight 
which met their shocked and grieved 
eyes almost dazed tiiem. 

" To think that I should live to see 
the day when a candidate for Sheriff 
on my ticket should have so much 
whisky that he has to feed it to his 
geese!' exclaimed. the elder, in pious 
horror. 

"Amos swore that he hadn't given 
the geese any wnisky. But the condi- 
tion of his pets was against his state- 
ment. 

" 'If it wasn't whisky it was rum or 
gin,' insisted the elder. 'I've observed 
the actions of wicked men too often 
not to know that these geese have 
been putting stuff in their mouths that 
mixes their brains and tangles their 
feet. Is a man who will lead a goose 
astray a person worthy of our votes 
for the high office of Sheriff? If you 
were elected, Amos Hoskins, you 
would probably want to start a saloon 
in the jail.' 

"If Amos had kept his wits about 
him and told the story of the pump- 
kin seeds and the treachery of Uncle 
Billy Wilson, he might have redeemed 
his reputation in the face of the scan- 
dalous actions of the geese. But he 
was a little puzzled himself, and, con- 
scious of innocence, he lost his tem- 
per at the attack made on him by El- 
der Benton. Instead of explaining mat- 
ters, he insinuated in pretty strong 
terms that the Elder was a gray- 
bearded prevaricator. In the end the 
Elder and his party left the yard in a 
rage, vowing they would even things 
up with Amos on election day. 

"And they did. When election came 
the hilariously inclined, led by Uncle 
Billy Wilson, voted against Amos, 
while the truly good were on hand 
with their knives and hammers. Amos 
didn't get enough votes to start a fire 
with. He was the maddest man in 
the State of Iowa. 

"I have lost my office and the re- 
spect of my geese,' he said bitterly. 
'But after I meet Uncle Billy Wilson 
an inquest will be the only thing he 
longs for ardently.' " — New York 
Sun. 



A man who went to see the Brid- 
gend relieving officer the other day 
to apply for relief did not know the 
name of his own wife, says the West- 
ern Mail, and he had to go home and 
inquire. He had called her a pet name 
so long that he had forgotten the real 
one. 



To Or. Nicoll of the Brit 
belongs lh< | the first 

books, and thin feat be has attempted 

ll next 
Hondl !''>r this we must 

Include n"i only the new books of 
the year, but those of previous 
for which there Is ■ demand— remem- 
bering thai this demand is partly sat- 
(li l>y the constant reprints 
now being issued by publishers; (8) 
\<\ second-hand booksellers. I do not 
count sixpenny n prints or second- 
hand books. My estimate is that 
the figure is between ten millions and 
twelve millions — nearer twelve than 
ten. This may not seem unsatisfac- 
tory, but it must be remembered that 
a very large number of these are 
school books." 



MADONNA. 
(Kntnna Trask, In Cosmopolitan > 
Behold tier stand' n woman — ret apart 
\ stately virgin, proud, divinely 
mild; 
And tied Ul her mother 

heart 
A little child. 

Amid earth's sorrows, in maternal Joy 
Victorious she rises, unafraid; 

Keeping her gracious guard about her 
boy. 
Calm, undismayed. 

Kings have waged warfare, armies lost 
and won. 
Tyrants their battle-holts long years 
have hurled; 
But lo! the Virgin and her little Son 
Still rule the world. 




v£*«£»L*'ns 



the, 



SAUCE 



RSrM^- 



0f "CINAL & GENUINE WORCESTER 

Butlers in best families and all first class 
cooks can tell you that soups. fish, meats, 
gravy, game.satads and many other dishes 
are given an appetising relish if flavored 
with Lea &Perrins' sauce. 



OxoLa. d(Jter 





o.vg: 

AND 

Special Reserve" 



REGISTERED BRANDS) 



W^DJSLH 



To be obtained of all • 
Wine Merchants 8c Dealers. 

William Wolff $ Go. San Francisco, 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS. 




24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 



Southern Pacific Co. —Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at 8AN FRANCI8CO: 
[Main line. Foot of Market Sireet] 



leave] 



Fbom January 1, 1901 



[ARRIVE 



7:30 A Benlcia, Sulsun, Elmira. Vacavllle, Rumsey, and Sacramento.. 7:45 P 

7:30 a Davis. Woodland, Knights Landing. Marysville, Orovtlle- 7:45 P 

7:30a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East 12:15 P 

8.00A Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo. Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa..... 6:15 p 

8:00 a Niles, Llvermore, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton 7:15 p 

8:39 a Shasta Express— Davis, Williams \for Bartlett Sprines), Wil- 
lows, Red Bluff. Portland 7:45 p 

8:30 A San Jose, Llvermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placervllle, 

Marysville. Chico, Red Bluff. 4:15 P 

8:30 A Oakdale, Chinese, Sonora. Carters. 4:15 P 

9:00 A Haywards, Ntles, and way stations 11:45 A 

9:00 a Los Angeles Expre-s— Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton, 

Merced, Fresno, and Los Anereles J:|5 p 

9:30 A Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations 5:45 P 

lu:u0 A The Overland Limited— Ogden. Denver. Omaha. Chicago 6:45 P 

11:00 A Niles, Stockton. Sacramento, Mendota, Fresno, Haniord. 

Visalla.PorterviHe 4:15 p 

11:00 a Llvermore, Sanger, Goshen Junction, Bakersfteld, Los 

tlsOO P Sacramento River Steamers t5:O0 A 

3:00 P Haywardfl. Niles, and way stations 5:45 P 

4;00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa. Calistoga, Santa Rosa 9:15 A 

4:00 P Benlcia. WlnterB, Sacramento, Woodland. Knight's Landing 

Marysville, Oroville +L :4 « A 

4:30 p Haywards, Niles andSanJose T8:45 a 

5:00 p Niles. Livermore, Stockton. Lodi 10:45 a 

ff5:00 p Sunset Limited. El P«so, New Orleans and East C10:15 A 

5:00 p The Owl Limited. Tracy. Fresno, Bakersfteld. Saugus for 

Santa Barbara. Los Angeles 10:15 A 

5:00 p New Orleans Express— Bakersfteld, Santa Barbara. Los An- 

geles, Demlng, El Paso. New Orleans, and East 7:45 A 

6:00 p Haywards, Niles, and San Jose 7; 45 A 

t6:0u p Vallejo 11 :45 A 

6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ogden, Cheyenne. Omaha, Chlcaeo 12:15 p 

6:00 p Oriental Mail— Ogden. Denver, Omaha, Chlcaeo 4:15 p 

7:00 p Oregon and California Express, Sacramento, Marysville. Red- 
dine. Portland Pueet Sound and East ft :45 A 

8:05 p San Pablo, Port Costa, Martinez and way stations 11:4^ a 

J8.-05P Vall ejo 7:l5p 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

8:15 a Newark. Centerville. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations 6:20 p 

t2:15P Newark. Centerville, San Jose. New Almaden, Felton. Boul- 
der Creek. Santa Cruz, and principal way stations T10:50 a 

4:15p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos 8:50 A 

Q9: 30p Hunters' Excursion. San Jose, and Way Stations 17:20 p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Feancisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).-t7:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
A. M. 1 :00. 3 :00, 5 :00. P. M. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway .-f6.-00. J8:00. tS.05. 10:00 A. m. 12:00. 
2:00. 4: 00, »5:15 P.M. __ 

Coast Division (Broad Gauee). (Third and Townse nd streets). 

t6:10A Ocean View. South San Francisco t6:30 P 

7:00a San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) 1:30 P 

9:00 a San Jose, TresPlnos, Santa Cruz. Pacific Grove, Paso Robles. 

San Luis Obispo, Surf, Lompoo, and principal waystatlons 4:10 P 

10:40 a San Jose and way stations 6:35 A 

11:30a San Jose and way stationB 5:30 P 

t2:45 p San Mateo, Redwood. Menlo Park. Palo Alto, Santa Clara. San 
Jose. Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 
Grove tW3G A 

J3:30p San Jose and Way Stations 7:30 p 
4:15 p San Jose and Principal Way StationB 9:45 A 
5:00 p San Jose. Los Gatos, and Principal Way Stations t9:00 a 

5:30 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations &$S A 

6:30 P San Jose and Way Stations T«:00 A 

all:45p Sau Jose and Way Stations 7:30 P 

A for Mornine. P for Afternoon. t Sundays excepted. 

tSundaysonly. 9 Mondnys, Wednesdays, Fridays, 

c Tuesdays. Thursdays. Sundays. « Saturdays only. 



The Pacific Teansfee Company will call for and check baeeaee from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Aeents for Time Cards andother 
Information. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 



ta 



Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf. San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports. 11 A. m.: February 5. 10. 15.20. 25 
March 2; chanee to company's steamers at Seattle. 

ForB. C. and Pueet Sound Ports, 11 a. m., Februarys. 
10. 15. 20. 25. Mar h 2. and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p. M.. February 2, 7, 12. 
17. 22. 27. March 4, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For San Dleeo, stoppine only at SantaBarbara. Port 
Los Aneeles. Redondo, (Los Angeles). "Queen." Wednesdays, 9 a. m„ 
Santa Rosa. Sundays. 9 a. m. 

For Santa Cruz. Monterey, San Simeon. Cayucos. Port Harford, San 
Luis Obispo. Gariota. Santa Barbara. Ventura, Huenemc. San Pedro, East 
San Pedro, and Newport (Los Aneeles), "Corona," Fridays. 9 a. m.; 
"Bonita," Tuesdays, 9 a. m. 
For Mexican ports, 10 A M., 7th of each month. 
For further Information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the rleht U> chanee steamers, salllne dates, and 
hours of salline, without previous notice. 
TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Monteomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
G00DALL, PERKINS & CO.. Gen.Aets., 10 Market St.. San Francisco. 



Santa re 
Route ' 



7:20 A. M. LOCAL FOR FRESNO. RAKERSFIELD 
and intermediate points. 9 a. m California Limited, 
with S'eepers. Dining and Observation Cars to Kansas 
City and Chicago. 4:20 p. m. Local for Stockton. 8 p. m. 
Overland Express, with Palace and Tourist SleeperB and 
Chair Cars San Francisco to Chlcaeo. 



Chicago >n less than 3 Days 

From San Francisco At 10 a. m 

Chicago, Union Pacific and 

North-Western Line 

Double Drawing-Rooni Sleeping Cars, Buffet, Smoking and Library 
Cars, with barber. Dining Cars — meals a la carte. Daily Tourist 
Car Service and Personally Conducted Excursions every week from 
San Francisco at G p. m. The best of everything. 

K. R. RITCHIE, General Agent Pacific Coast, 

617 MarEet St., Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 

C. A. Murdock & Co., PRINTERS^^ 

No. 532 GLAlr STREET, S- F. 



California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibcron Ferry— Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30.9:00. 11:00 a. m; 12:35. 3:30. 5:10. 6:30 p. m. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11 :0i i p. m. Saturdays— Extra trlpB at 1 :50 and 11 :30 p. m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30. 11 :00 A. m.; 1:30, 3:30. 5:00, 6:20 p. m. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10.7:50.9:20,11:10 a. m.; 12:45. 3:40. 5:10 p. m. Saturdays 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6^5p.h, 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40. 11 :10 A. h.;1:40. 3:40. 5:05. 655 P. M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 

Leave San Francisco I In Effect Nov. 7, 1900 1 Arrive in San Francisco 



Week days 1 Sundays 



Destinations 



Sundays I Week days 



7:30 AM 
3:30 PH 
5:10 PH 



8:00 am 
9:30 AM 
5:00 pm 



Novato 
Petal uma 
Santa Rosa 



10:40 am 
6:05 PM 
7:35 pm 



8:40 am 
1025 am 
622 pm 



7:30 AM 
3:30 pm 



Fulton. Windsor. 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 

Geyserville. Cloverdale 



1025 AM 
622 PM 



7:30 am 


8:00 AM 1 


Hopland, Ukiah 


1 7:35 pm 


622 PM 


7:30 AM 
3:30 PM 


8:00 AM 1 


Guerneville 


| 735 pm 


10:25 am 
6:22 PM 


7:30 AM 
5:10 pm 


8:00 am 1 
5:00 PM 1 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


1 9:15 am 
1 6:05 pm 


8:40 am 
6:22 PM 


7:30 AM 
3:3il PH 


8:00 ah 1 
5:00 PM 1 


Sebastopol 


| 10:40 am 
1 7:35 pm 


1025 AM 
622 PM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs; at Fulton lor Altruria; at Lytton lor Lytton Springs : at Geyserville 
for Skaggs' Springs; at Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan 
Springs, Highland Springs, Kelseyville. Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay. Lake- 
port, and Bartlett Springs; at Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs. 
Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, Witter Springs. Upper Lake, Pomo, Potter 
Valley, John Day's, Riverside, Llerley's. Bucknell's, Sanhedrln Heights. 
Hullville. Boonevllle. Philo, Christine Soda Springs. Navarro, Whltes- 
boro, Albion, Little River, Orr's Springs, Mendocino City. Fort Bragg. 
Westport. Usal Willits, Laytonville, Cummings, Bell's Springs, Harris, Ol- 
son's, Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays. 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 



H. C. WHITING, Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass, Agent. 



Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m.. for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hlogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkon 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Saturday, Feb. 9. 1901 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Thursday. March 7, 1901 

Garlic (via Honolulu) Saturday, March 30, 1901 

Doric (via Honolulu) Thursday, April 25. 1901 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. . 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office. No. 421 Market street 

corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 



unit 




SS "Australia." to Tahiti. Friday, Feb. 8. 4 p. m. 
8S "Ventura," Wednesday, Feb 13. at 9 p m, 
SS "Mariposa." Saturday, Feb- 23. 2 i>. m. 
Line I" Coolgnrdic, Australia, and Capclown, 
South Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS A BROS. CO.. 
Agent-. 643 Market Street. Freight oOlce. 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 



February 2, 1901. 



8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



BALLADE OF THE BLESSINGS OF PRIMITIVE MAN. 

Wh«-n A<!«m. In fl* taftToa arrayed, 

klnc rain would him hi. . 
Dieting end -»ayp*i — 

For Bra was the only 0O« n;. 
Hfl was faithful without kftOwlBf, why. 

• onstanrv - mirth — 

Ha couldn't maki Ion on th» 
With only on« woman on earth. 

He didn't make lore to a mnhl 

use the moon shone in the sky, 
Nor flirt In some cool, ferny elude 
use there was nobody by; 
Though truly he never "flew high," 
His steadfastness hadn't much worth. 

He couldn't flirtation's art ply 
With only one woman on earth. 

I would / had faithful been made — 

I love every girl that goes by! 
My fancy a moment is stayed 

And then to another does fly. 

I cannot be constant, not I — 
Now, Adam d a snap from his birth: 

He couldn't make love far and nigh 
With only one woman on earth. 

LVSNVOI. 

Prince, list to a fickle man's sigh: 
Should there be of maidens a dearth, 

I too might be constant, e'en I, 
With only one woman on earth! 

ELEANOR STEWART HAMMOCK. 
Nordoff. Jan. 27. 1901. 



THE NICKEL PLATE ROAD (N. Y. C. & St. L. R. R.) 

offers East bound passengers three elegantly appointed ves- 
tlbuled express trains daily between Cnicago and New York 
and Chicago and Boston. For sleeping car reservations and 
full information address Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast Pas- 
senger Agent, 37 Crocker Build. ng, San Francisco, Cal. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Yellow Jacket Gold and Silver Mining Company. 

Location of works. Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada- Principal place Of 
business. Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice if* hereby (riven that at n meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the tenth nay of January, 1901, an assessment (No. 6) of fifteen cents 
per share was levied upon each and every share of the Capital Stock of 
said Company, payable immediately to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, or to .lames Newlanils, Transfer Secretary, Room 35, Mills 
Building, third floor. San Francisco. California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on Friday 
THE 15th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1901. 
will be delinquent, and advertised f<T sale nt public aucion; and unless 
payment is made ' efore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 2"th day of 
March. 19(rt at four o'clock p. m. in front of the office of the Company, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together w'th the coats of advertising and 
expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of TrusteeB. 

W. H- BLAUVELT, Secretary 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business. San Francisco, California; location 
of works— Virginia Mining District, Storey county. Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 28th day of December, 1900. an assessment (No. &5) of five cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately, in United States gold coin, to the secretary at the office of the com- 
pany, room 29. Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Anv stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
1st DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1901 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, the 21st day of Febru- 
ary, 1901 to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of ad- 
vertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors, 

A. W. HAVENS. Secretary. 
Office— Room 29, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. San Francisco. Cal 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Occidental Conso idated Mining Company. 

No. 3G 

Scents 

December 28. 1900 

January 31, 1901 

February 21, 1901 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office: Room 57. Nevada Block, 3l-9 Montgomery St., S. P. Cal 



Assessment 

Amount per share 

Levied - • 

Delinquent in office 

Day of sale of delinquent stock 



I.m»tl 



AISCMMCNT NOTICE. 
CtrlbM Oil Mining Cvmptftf 
■I »l«— o4 bwk>*— M*n I" • 






•Uo 



nU 



'•. h*ld 



■ 

■ ■ 

T.U. 

Any •!••• k MpOQ w bt_| Ih1« n«<r«incii! «hall retimln iinpnl ■ 

THE i.o. DAI OF II Kim un 

will h# drllnqtirnl and nrivrrtWrd for amlc al publli auotlon, ui 

before. «ill t..- iiold on IT T B8DAY. !).-■ fifth MhJ 
• lay ol Mftrab, 1 "1 . I" i' i\ it.o .!. lin.iiK til ii-"-' ■•inriit, toy, Out w Ith thr 

I wlvcriMnff mui oxpentM of aali Bj omtoi of tin- Bootdof Dtn 

\r<. \\ \ti i:m \v -.. rcury 

Room M, Ncxndn Blooki HP Ifontg tr> *trt«(. Sun Francisco, 

California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTiCE 

Belcher Silver Mining Company. 
I.ocrttton <.f principal place ••( hurl now Don Pram laoOi Cal, i location of 
w o t fc a Gold HUI,8torey < iiy. Nevada, 

Noliccin IutcI.v (riven Unit ;it R tneeUnSJ Ol the BoUd "1 EMrOOtOTB, held 

on it,,- third .lay «.f January, I 001, an aaaeanmentt Mo. 87 1 "f Ten cent* per 
■hare was levied upon the capital stock ol the corporation, payable unr 

mediately in United state* sold ooln, to the secretary, at the office of the 
:. third M<».r. Mills Building, corner Bush and Montgomery street*. 
Ban PVanobno. Oal, 
Any stock upon which this assessment Bhall remain unpaid on 
THE 6th DAY OP FEBRUARY. 1901. 
will be delinquent, and advertised lor sale at. public auction, nnd unless pay- 
ment Lb made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 27th day "f 
February, 1901, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the coats 
of advertising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

F. E. DIETZ. Secretary. 
Office— Room 37. third floor Mills Building, northeast corner Bush and 
BfontCOmery Sta., San Francisco. Cal, 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE, 
Potosl Mining Company. 

I oration of principal plaee of business— San Frnncif-eo, California. Loca 
Hon "i workH— Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the I1th day of January. 1901, an assessment (No. 5m) of ten (1") cents 
per Bhore was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable Im- 
mediately in United Slates gold coin, to the Secretary, at the otftoe ol the 
rompany, room 79, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 
California. 

Any stock upon which this a°sessment shall remain unpaid on the 
19th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1901, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is made before will he sold on THURSDAY, the 14th day of March, 
1901. to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of advertising 
and expenses of sale. 

By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHA°. E. ELLIOT, Secretary, 

Oflice— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery streets, Sun Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No 121 

Amount per share 15 cents 

Levied J nuary 19, 1901 

Delinquent in oflice February 21, 1901 

Day of sale of delinquent stock March 14, 1901 

E. L. PARKER, Secretary- 
Office: Room 19, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street. Sun Francisco, Ca 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Gould & Curry Silver Mining Company. 

Assessment No. 93 

Amount per share 10 cents 

Levied December 4, 1900 

Delinquent in office January 7, 1901 

Day of sale of delinquent stock January 28, 1901 

ALFRED K. DURBROW, Secretary. 
Office — Room 69, Nevada Block. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of John Bobbins Oeceased. 
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, P. Boland, Administrator of 
the Estate of John Robbing deceased, to the creditors, of, and all persons 
having claims against the said deceased, to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchors, within four (i) months after the first publication of this notice, to 
the said P. Boland, Administrator at his place of business No. 238 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco, the same being his place for the transaction 
of the business of the said estate in the City and County of San Francisco, 
State of California. 

P. BOLAND, 
Administrator of the Estate of John RoDblns, Deceased. 
M. C. IIASSETT. Attorney for Administrator, 

308-10-12 Phelan Building, San Francisco. 
Dated at San Francisco. January 12th.. 1901. 

GEORGE GOODMAN 

Patentee and Manufacturer of 

Artificial Stone 

(Sfhillinger's Patient) in all its branches- Sidewalk and garden walk a 
specialty. 

Office— 307 Montgomery Street, Nevada Block, San Francisco- 



2G 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 2, 1901. 



Describing the Sort of Cha^p 

The D\ike of Manchester Is. 



By Reginald Schuyler. 



While I am in no sense an Anglo-maniac, there is one char- 
acteristic of the American people that strikes far from my 
pleasure. And that is this: the Americans have no titles of 
their own beyond those of the military, navy, bench and body 
politic, and therefore deem it a matter of good principle to 
"josh" the nobles of Great Britain and the other older coun- 
tries. This impresses me as being the summit of bad man- 
ners and bad taste. The American is altogether too fresh 
iu his treatment of the time-honored customs and traditions 
of other nations. Witness for instance the jokes that have 
been leveled at our townsman, George Ely Hall, because, 
forsooth, he has been honored by many medals and decora- 
tions. Witness the joke and jest directed against the Baron 
von Schroeder, because, forsooth, he is a baron. Witness, 
again the satire and insult hurled at Manchester, because, 
forsooth, the gentleman is a duke, and incidentally, has had 
the fortune to w r ed with an American girl, whose male par- 
ent is obese with this world's goods. 

It is His Grace the Duke that suggests my subject. At 
Monte Carlo several years ago it was my pleasure to meet 
him. I found him a simple, direct, natural youth, with a 
good sense of fun, and not particularly dissipated. Some 
Johnny had lost more than he could afford that night, and 
had blown out his brains in the gardens to the tune of a 
Strauss waltz. Manchester thought the affair noisy and spec- 
tacular. 

"I like your American custom," he said — "first blow the 
money, then the gas." 

This single quotation will show that His Grace is no slouch 
at epigram. 

He was rather a frugal gambler, to my thought, never per- 
mitting his stake to more than double. Winning twice he 
would sink all but the amount of his original bet. 

"Schuyler," said the Duke, "I've found out several things, 
about gambling: if you win three bets, sink two in your trow- 
sers and then your next loss will not matter." 

Manchester's logic is as good as his wit. Playing on this 
system he lost little and won less. 

As I insinuated before, His Grace has a lively humor. 
When I met him at the Palace bar the other day he said: 
"Hello, Schuyler, I hear you are writing for the press!" 

"And is that a disgrace?" said I. 

"Not by a long shot," answered Manchester. "Didn't I do 
it myself in New York until they fired me!" We had a drink 
and a long talk. I was amazed to observe that His Grace 
drank the plain Bourbon whisky of America. 

"It agrees with me better than Scotch, does the United 
States," said Manchester. 

Well, it would perhaps be indiscreet for me to tell all 
that this simple, genuine fellow said, but I left him in ad- 
miration. He has married a rich man's daughter, to be sure. 
But she is an original, charming woman, and you and I with 
a ducal coronet to throw away would be only too happy to 
throw it in her direction. In the meantime, don't overlook 
the fact that the Duke is one of the best chaps in the world. 



It jars a man to find, after taking a glass of whisky 

that the skin has been eaten from his throat as though he 
had just swallowed a dose of nitric acid. That is the effect 
which cheap whiskey has upon the gentlemanly drinker, 
but if he sticks to the J. F. Cutter brand he will never feel 
that smarting of the palate, or that unhealthy excitement 
which follows the use of commercial "bug-juice." J. F. 
Cutter whiskey is a gentle, grateful comforter, a stimulant 
but not an intoxicant, a drink for the refined and fastidious. 



"In the spring the housewife's fancy brightly turns 

to thoughts of carpets." You will save yourself a great 
deal of worry, madame, — to say nothing of expense and 
dirt — if you send your carpets to Spaulding's Carpet Clean- 
ing Works, 353 Tehama street. Spaulding has the art of 
removing dust down to a nicety, and there is no fear of 
injuring the most delicate fabrics by his process, which is 
scientific. 




Deafness Overcome: 

Science has triumphed at last. 

Latest and greatest invention up 
to times. " Invisible Ear-phone." 
Conveys sound directly to nerve of 
hearing. Appliance inseited in eat. 
Vibrating coil acts like telephone. 
Reasonabe. Head noises, ear dis- 
charges cured quickly. Write for treatise and testi- 
monials free. 

INVISIBLE EAR PHONE CO , 

i2?o Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hotel Bartholdi, 

THE very center of the city, convenient to 
all .the big stores and all places of amusement 
European plan, 8l a day and upwards. 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Sauare Park) 
Finest cafe in this city. 



Milton Roblee. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Wm, B. Hooper, Manager 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

San Francisco 



RIGGS HOUSE 



Washington, D. C, 

The Hotel " Par Excellence" 



—John W. Carmany still makes shirts, stylish and well-flttlng. 
He Is at room 32, second floor Chronicle Building. 



of the National Capital. First-class in all appointments. 0. G. 
Staples, President; G. Devitt, Treasurer. 

American plan, $3 per day and upwards. 

Paraiso Hot Springs 

The Carlsbad of America 

Open Winter and Summer 



MOSTEKEY COCKTV, CAL. 



C. T. Komie, Proprietor 



J. B. Pon. I Pierre Carrere, Founder of Malson Tortont. I O. Lalannb 

Old Poodle Doq Restaurant 

445 Bush street, cor. Grant Avenue. San Francisco 
Lunch, BO cts. Dinner. 76 els. Also, a la carte. 



I. Deutch, Proprietor. 

Crystal Palace 



Telephone, Main 5544 



5 Kearny St., 12 Geary St., S. F. Cal. 

Choice Wines and Liquors. 



Cafe Royal, 




Corner Fourth and Market streets, San Francisco, 
Try our special hrew steam and lacer beer, 5 cents 
Overcoats and valises checked free. 



ST. LAWRENCE Livery and 
Sales Stable 

423 Post street, between Powell and Mason, 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1323 

W. E. Bridge, proprietor. 



Prlc«. p«r copy. 10 cents. 




ESTABLISHED JULY », 1M 



Annual Subtcnptlon, MOO 



<&nlifov\\m%bbtxtiscx. 




Vol. LXII. 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 9, 1901. 



Number 6. 



Printed And published every Saturday by the propTtator, WKBD 
M UmilVTT. SS Kttrnr <lrcct. San Francisco. Entered at 9»n Fran- 
cisco Poatofflce as second-class mRtter. 

The efllce nl the S K. NEWS LETTER In London. F.ni . In at .10 Cornhlll 
r" < .. I...n.]..n. England. {Oe Tire street A t'.... Representative* . where 
Information may be obtained recalling subscriptions And Advertising 
rate*. Pari* France — Office. No T7 Avenue de L'Opera- 

All social Items, announcement*, advertising or other matter, Intended f"r 
publication In the carTent number of the NKW8 LETTER, should be 
sent to this office not later than 6 p. m. Thursday- 



Governmental approval does mean something utter all, 
since the Great Father at \A ashington has refused to pro- 
mote Hobson. 



With the Queen of Holland safely married the Dutch Par- 
liament may breathe a sigh of relief and turn their minds 
to less important affairs of State. 



The investigating committee at San Quentin has found 
that Waldon has taken away less than $4000 worth of prop- 
erty, so you see the State got its experience at rather rea- 
sonable rates. 



Dr. William Fitch Cheney in a recent lecture before the 
Cooper Medical College says that it is not good for babies to 
be kissed. Young fathers and male relatives may remember 
this to advantage and thus be saved a painful family cere- 
mony. 



Papa Ita (no relation to Papa Zimmerman) is being wor- 
shiped in Hawaii because of his ability to walk barefoot 
over coals of fire. This is a State which is to-day the proud- 
est boast of our missionaries for the quality and variety 
of its Christian converts. 



William Brandes, who murdered his 14-year-old daughter, 
seems to be another whom heaven and the law have con- 
spired to keep unhanged. And now J. S. Harvey, principal 
witness against him, is as dead as Brandes should have 
been these many moons if Justice were just. 



The Governor of Ohio showed that he was made of differ- 
ent stuff from the Mayor of Cincinnati, when he forbade 
the Jeffries-Ruhlin prize fight, so the contest is now to go 
under the head of a "sparring match," which means that 
either the law or the public are going to be buncoed. 



The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children 
may not have done much for the youngsters in preventing 
managers from exhibiting children in vaudeville. This is 
an act of grace which the Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Audiences should have performed long ago. 



Eighteen Creek Indians, incarcerated in a Government 
jail for going on the warpath, pathetically declare that they 
did not go to war to kill white people. Previous exper- 
ience with the noble redskin would go to prove how much 
truth there is in the declaration of the prisoners that they 
did not intend to kill whites. 



The Rev. Frederick W. Smith was mildly explanatory after 
services last Sunday evening when a dozen muscular young 
men of Oakland waited on him demanding redress for the in- 
sulting personalities in the evangelist's sermon. The Smith 
person even went so far as to declare that some men might 
even be almost moral, though not professed Christians. 
Smith, you see, is not always violent. 



Mrs. Josephine Smith, who tried her own cause so poorly 
in the divorce suit of Smith vs. Smith, has consented to 
put the case In the hands of a competent attorney In the re- 
hearing to come. So the first trial was not such a farce after 
all, since it taught the lady how much she didn't know about 
law. 



When the gentle public a few mornings back read the 
petition of Melick of Pasadena to allow California women to 
TOte, there was a momentary stoppage in the heartbeats 
of the many. Subsequent reading showed that the bill was 
aimed to allow women to vote on school elections, which 
was quite a relief to the gentle public who at first saw- 
visions of Mrs. Nation as Governor of California. 



Not so very long ago, Charles J. Anderson was buncoed in- 
to making a fortune in the Klondike, and subsequently he 
married a variety queen who proceeded to bunco him out of 
the money he had been buncoed into making. Klondikers 
might take a tip from the sad case of Anderson, and numer- 
ous others, and marry somewhere outside of the dramatic 
profession. 



William McDade in 1896 wagered $285,000 that he could 
leave San Francisco with but one cent in the pocket of a 
■ newspaper suit, which he wore, visit every country on the 
globe and return with $5,500 in his pocket. A week ago 
McDade died of disappointment in a New York workhouse. 
If he had been put in a madhouse instead of a workhouse 
six years ago, McDade might never have died of his disap- 
pointment. 



Howevermuch right there may be on the side of the Fili- 
pino, the people of the islands who are in arms against the 
United States troops are enemies of our commonwealth, 
and such of our people as communicate with our enemies 
with a view to advancing their cause can be known only 
by one name — the unpleasant name of traitors. Whether 
Wilcox of Hawaii has written treasonable letters to Agui- 
naldo is not yet known, but should he have done so, his 
punishment should fit his crime. 



Marriages may not be made in heaven, but the coming 
nuptials between Pauline Astor and the Duke of Roxburge 
is well nigh divine from the standpoint of the father, William 
Waldorf Astor. Think of it! A real Duke! Not in vain 
these years of snubs and aristocratic jests, thinks William 
Waldorf, who will almost have reached the summit of his 
ambition in becoming the father-in-law of a genuine imported 
Duke. Now may he indeed forget his country — if the Eng- 
lish will allow him to do so. 



When Sam Davis, the sage brush humorist, interviewed 
Sarah Bernhardt and inquired the lady's age, she replied: 
"Let me see, my son Maurice is twenty-eight, and" — count- 
ing on her fingers rapidly — "that would make me, say, 29 
with a month or two to spare." That was wit. But now the 
divine Sarah has fallen a victim to the charms of the great 
American Life Insurance policy, and of course she had to 
tell the examining physician her exact age. And this, spell- 
ing as it does the numbers 57, has leaked over the wires to 
all the world. Joseph Jefferson has been dead twenty years 
when you think of this woman within arm's reach of sixty 
and the greatest actress in the world for a part in the small 
teens. The hands of the clock work the other way round for 
Sarah — except when it comes to paying the premium on her 
insurance. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



February 9, 1901. 



HOW MUNICIPAL OWNERSHIP MAY BE RENDERED 
PRACTICABLE. 

From the trend of recent legislation in many States and 
municipalities, it seems inevitable that the experiment of the 
public ownership of public utilities, will ere long be tried. 
That such an experiment may be made successful, under cer- 
tain favorable conditions, is of course possible. But those 
conditions do not exist in our large cities, in which the irre- 
sponsible, non-taxpaying portion of the community are in a 
majority, and control elections. Yet. if the better class of 
our citizens can be educated to a due understanding of the 
problems that municipal ownership involves, it is very pos- 
sible to hedge around any experiment that may be made, 
with such safeguards as will protect the interests of the bona 
fide taxpayers. 

In the first place it will never do to rush headlong into the 
purchase, by condemnation or otherwise, of street railroads, 
water supply, gas, etc., by bonding the city's credit in pay- 
ment of the same. That would be a plan too risky to be 
thought of for a moment. If the experiment failed it would 
leave behind an amount of indebtedness the city might never 
be able to repay. Besides, as only the taxpaying portion of 
the community would be responsible for the debt, the other 
classes would be under no restraint as to how they should 
vote to make the utilities as purchased earn expenses, and 
interest on capital. That is the real danger ahead. Rich 
as San Francisco is she may, if due caution be not exercised 
at the outset, be mortgaged to death by the inexperienced, 
or reckless men to whose care the purchase of utilities might 
be confided. 

The proper security to offer is the thing purchased. If 
the purchase is made with ordinary business sagacity, the 
property ought, in this ever enlarging city, to soon be worth 
more than was paid for it, and therefore good security to 
those who might go bonds over it. The present owners of our 
utilities find no trouble in borrowing money on their prop- 
erty, and. of course, the city would be in still better position, 
because its credit would not be in danger of harrassment 
from adverse legislation. If disaster, from any cause, should 
overtake the city's ownership, her creditors would simply 
take the utility, and the city would be as she was before the 
purchase; no worse and no better, except to the extent ot 
the valuable experience she would be bound meanwhile to 
acquire. 

Then the utility must be made self-supporting, and the 
city's treasury should never be allowed to be broken open 
for money with which to pay either expenses or interest. 
Any of the city's utilities worth buying pay their way now, 
and some of them are credited with making a great deal of 
money. It would be safe to provide by legislation that they 
should do no less under public management. In any event 
there must be no "open door" to the treasury, through which 
money might be eternally taken to bolster up mismanage- 
ment and waste. In another column we point out how they 
are making a success of State owned railroads in New Zea- 
land. In ner case the wise precaution was taken to have it 
denominated in the bonds that no tariff of fares and freights 
should be continued in existence that did not produce in- 
come enough to pay for operating expenses, necessary bet- 
terments, interest, and a sinking fund of not less than one 
per cent per annum. If through dullness of trade or any 
other cause, the income of one year falls below these re- 
quirements, then the tariff for the next year must be so 
fixed as to make good the shortage. It is thereby made 
impossible for an improvident or popularity-seeking legis- 
lature to burden the general taxpayer with the cost of run- 
ning railroads at a loss. As a consequence, they are not so 
run, but are being easily made to fulfill the foregoing 
conditions. If this city is to go in for municipal ownership, 
it must be upon some such plan, as to earnings, as that just 
outlined. 

Then, in order that all our people may know how their 
utilities are getting along, a very rigid system of auditing 
accounts must be established, and efficiently maintained. 
There must be no San Quentin jute mill business about 
running a city's street cars or water supply. It should be 
ascertainable at any time just what each particular service 
costs, and the accounts should be made public every year. 

Without these precautions, it is not difficult to foresee 
that the municipal ownership and control of public utili- 



ties must prove a colossal blunder. With them, and a strict 
attention to the business in hand, it is very possible tha 
what other countries have succeeded in doing, we may a( 
complish. 



THE POLICE INVESTIGATION. 

The police investigation now going on in this city is not what 
it pretends to be. Its instigators and managers are not act- 
ing unselfishly for the public good, nor are they haters of 
police corruption per sr, nor do they care one brass farthing 
for good municipal Government if they cannot control it. 
The truth is that the Police Commissioners, aided by Chief 
Sullivan and earnestly supported by Mayor Phelan, have 
a herculean task before them. They are expected to give 
the city a more honest and better police force without having 
the material to do it with. The instruments they have to 
work with are for the most part creatures of the old corrupt 
regime that is secretly at war with the new order of things. 
All the "old pets" are still in office, and claim the right to 
remain there under the civil service section of the new char- 
ter. That section, as well as that relating to police pen- 
sions, constitute a part of the price the Freeholders had to 
pay for the passage of the charter, but it gave a renewed 
lease of office to elements in the police force that make for 
trouble of various kinds. They are for the old methods of 
running Chinatown, which included the political sciences 
of addition, division and silence. To the honor of Chief 
Sullivan, be it said, he soon gave evidence that he wanted 
a newer and better way. "It can't be done nohow you fix 
it," exclaimed the old pets in chorus. They assured the 
Chief that "the men always had taken a piece in Chinatown, 
and there was no way of stopping them." The Chief set 
his wits to work to find a way, and he found one, if it can 
only be made to stick. It is not an ideal way, but it is sus- 
ceptible of being made very efficient. He has required his 
officers to supply him with a list of all the gambling dens 
in Chinatown. The proprietors of these he proposes to ar- 
rest once a month. The police judges, acting in concert with 
a well-defined public policy, are expected to impose cer- 
tain moderate fines, which the gamblers can pay. In this 
way some $95,000 a year would go into the city treasury, 
which now goes into the pockets of policemen. It is said 
that this is practically "condoning a felony," or licensing 
gambling, which is prohibited by law. But there may hon- 
estly be two opinions on that point. The felony of a man is 
not condoned when he is arrested for it. and pays the penalty 
exacted by justice and the law. At any rate, it is, on its 
face, a well-meant and honest attempt to strike at the tap 
root of one of Chinatown's many evils. It is a plan that 
ought not to be condemned until it has had a fair trial, 
and proves a failure. Meanwhile due credit should be given 
the men who, against opposition we do not care to character- 
ize, are doing their best to give the city a cleaner and better 
Government. As to the part journalism is taking in this 
fray the people who are not fools are looking on, and are 
very capable of judging for themselves. 



THE PILOT SERVICE. 



The usual bill to reform the Pilot service has been intro- 
duced in the Sacramento Legislature. Every session this 
measure appears with expected regularity, and every ses- 
sion, thanks to the good offices of the pilot's friends, it is 
laid aside or defeated. Nominally the bill is intended to 
effect a reform, practically it belongs to the genus cinch, 
and the only harm it effects is to cause the pilots an unnec- 
cessary amount of trouble and expense in defeating it. 
The attempt simply furnishes another illustration of the folly 
of allowing a party of State politicians at Sacramento to 
control the affairs of the greatest port on the Pacific Coast. 
But until we get an independent, non-political Harbor Trust 
for San Francisco, we suppose these things must go on, and 
ignorance, incompetence and extravagance still continue to 
characterize the management of our water front. However. 
it will not do to ignore these attacks upon our Port, for some 
day, by an unfortunate accident, one of these precious pilot 
bills might slip through both houses, and work irreparable 
harm to our shipping interests. In the present measure 
Senator Maggard. who originated the bill, has gone even 
farther than usual and evidently aims, not merely at reform- 
ing the pilot service, but at actually improving it out of ex- 



February 9. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



He proposes. In the first Instance, to abolish the 
■it Pilot Commission, and Bnbstituts :i Dumber o( Inde- 
pendent commissioners at aacll i>« > 1 1 under the conl 
~!\ip Harbor Commission. This Item ma] be I 
over as merely an excuse for creating fresh political p 
sge. since the change would not materially alter the present 
condition of affairs. Mure MriOUS la the proposal to 

rally confiscate the pilot's property In their boats, Under 

the present system, which though not an ideal one. h;is ;il 
least the sanction of usage, the pilots own the yachts, tour 
of them, the finest of their class afloat. Bach ol 
superb vessels costs about $80,000, and the tad thai they 
hold their stations in all weathers off the stormy Golden 
Gate illustrates their sea-going capacity. Thus there is 
$S".!iO0 invested in these craft alone, and Senator Haggard 
calmly proposes to appropriate the amount. He makes no 
provision for the purchase of boats and only suggests an 
allowance of $400 a mouth for the maintenance and repair 
of each one. Apparently he is not aware that it costs at 
least $300 a month to keep each pilot vessel in commission, 
and to this must be added another $100 for new sails, repairs, 
etc., and $100 for depreciation, making $700 a month in all. 
Who is to pay this deficiency of $300 is not explained. The 
State won't, and the pilots can't, so if this precious bill 
passes there is sure to be a deadlock. The pilots themselves 
are to have their present share of fees commuted for a 
monthly salary of $200, and as this is about their average 
earnings, there would be no serious objection if the owner- 
ship of the boats were satisfactorily arranged. But no good 
can come of these tinkering measures. What San Francisco 
demands and must have is a thoroughly xip-to-date steam 
pilot service, such as every other large port in the world 
possesses. Let the Legislature take the matter in hand seri- 
ously, buy out the old sailing craft and substitute a modern 
steamer, and it will have the undivided support of the San 
Francisco shipping men. 



THE CHANGE OF OWNERSHIP OF THE RAILROAD. 

The Southern Pacific Railroad system has passed into 
new hands. It is a curious fact in American industrial and 
financial history that founders of great enterprises rarely 
leave behind heirs capable of continuing to build on the foun- 
dations laid by their fathers. The four great men who con- 
ceived the idea of building the Central Pacific railroad and 
its connecting lines have passed over to the majority, with- 
out leaving successors equal to the task of taking hold of and 
managing the vast properties which the "Big Four" had in 
their lifetime accumulated. Hopkins, Stanford, and Hunt- 
ington died absolutely childless, and Charles Crocker left 
sons who appear to have had no heart in their father's busi- 
ness, for they soon parted with their interest in it. The same 
rule appears to hold good in other parts of the country. 
George M. Pullman left no capable heir behind, disinherited 
his worthless son, bequeathed his vast estates to his daugh- 
ters and their children, and deeded his business over to an 
incorporated company. That great captain of industry, 
Phil D. Armour, of Chicago, died the other day, his only 
son having preceded him to the grave by a few months. 
Andrew Carnegie, having no male heir of his own blood, 
is during his life-time parting with the great steel works 
which might have heen made to perpetuate the name of Car- 
negie, and yield colossal fortunes to unborn generations of 
that name. On the $200,000,000 or more of money 'he has 
accumulated, he is administering in a way to give it the wid- 
est possible distribution. He is huilding and donating to 
publi use free public libraries, all the way from his native 
Scotland to Alameda county, on the shores of the Bay of San 
Francisco. Clearly no one will found a parvenu aristocracy 
on his wealth. Many more cases in illustration of the point 
we are making might be cited, but enough. In a few in- 
stances big estates may be held together until the second or 
third generation, but active enterprises such as those car- 
ried on by the men whose names we have mentioned, are 
hound to disintegrate and fall into other hands upon the 
death of their originators. If this view he correct, there is 
not the danger in the big fortunes of these times that many 
are disposed to imagine. Without a law of primogeniture, 
the tendency is towards the distribution, and not the per- 
petuation, of large fortunes. The change of ownership of 



onthern Pacific does not make much more than a senti- 
mental difference to the people of this State. Naturally 
enough they preferred thai California's net-work ol rail" 
should i»' owned by CalMornlans. We like to nave 
the owners among us. if it were only for the pm i 

ting al them for the purposes ol criticism. Bui thai chapter 

of history is turned down. The railroads will go on B 
lore, trying to reduce expenses, increase earnings, and make 

money. 



THE LESSON OF VERDI. 

Verdi died at the age of eighty-eight what you might call 
■. young man. In work and in years he outlived Gladstone, 
Bismarck and other men of the Nineteenth Century, equally 
great in their respective walks of life. Verdi's life stopped 
only when it had departed. Some men are dead for a score 
i.i years at a time without knowing it. Verdi kept pace with 
the procession. He is a record in the possibilities of human 
endurance and artistic enterprise. Day by day he reflected 
in his work the spirit of that day. He, the greatest of all 
Italian opera composers, was the first to overcome the Italian 
prejudice against the dramatic music of Germany and adopt 
the idiom of Wagner. He combined in "Aida" the luscious 
melody of the Latin with the rugged dramaisms of the Teu- 
ton and wrote an opera that will live. Later he adventured 
still deeper into the simplicities of "musical conversa- 
tion" and wrote "Otello," which is neither German nor Ital- 
ian nor anything but pure Verdi. Guisseppe Fortunio Verdi 
was always ahreast and sometimes ahead of his times. He 
came of poor parents who gave him little save a high sound- 
ing name. He lived up to that name for four score years 
and eight. It would seem that he had discovered the foun- 
tain of youth — and so he had in a way, for he kept his mind 
limber and his senses plastic. He could hear the new note 
from afar. While his contemporaries grew old and stale 
he grew young and fresh. His music was as timely as your 
morning paper, with the difference that it lasted longer. His 
life and works are a lesson for ail men. Where there are a 
will and a way there is no such thing as age. Fathers, 
grandfathers study the life of Verdi, withdraw your resign- 
ations and wake up to the beauty and activity of life. 



SOMETHING WRONG WITH SIX O'CLOCK CLOSING. 

The retail clerks of San Francisco are having a good 
chance to see how unionism works in their line of work. 
Some months ago they banded for a 6 o'clock closing, and 
got it. Since that time any number of retail merchants 
have got the sheriff's lock on their doors; and now there are 
many union clerks who can quit work earlier than 6. In 
tact they don't have to work at all until they find new jobs. 
In theory the union is a God-given institution; in practice 
it is sometimes decidedly less. By closing at 6, most of the 
clerks and salespeople have had their luncheon hour reduced 
to just half that time, which gives them practically no oppor- 
tunity to shop for themselves. When they had plenty of time 
at noon and evening they could easily attend to their wants, 
but now when they all start work at practically the same 
time, quit at the same time, and have no spare minutes at 
noon, how are they going to buy anything? And they repre- 
sent a most important class of consumer. The men and 
women behind the counter and the desk must be decently 
gowned and shod and hatted. And what is the result of the 
(i o'clock closing? Merely this: Union clerks are compelled 
to sneak into non-union establishments at night to make 
their purchases. Asked by the writer why all the shops of 
the city did not agree on the 6 o'clock closing, the head 
salesman in a big retail establishment said: "Some of them 
do not have to; they are sure of a big trade from the union 
people alone, who have no time but the evening for buy/ing 
clothes and things." Far be it from the News Letter to ad- 
vocate harder hours for those who do a good day's work 
even on the present scale. But it strikes me as being a bit 
unfair that the proprietors who have willingly agreed to the 
6 o'clock closing should lose the trade of the very class 
of people they have made the sacrifice for. One remedy is 
for the clerks to work on the hours system. There is no big 
rush in the early morning, so it would be an easy matter for 
a few of the employees to report later than is now the cus- 
tom, making up the time at night. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 9, 1901. 



HOW SOCIALISM IS BEING MADE TO WORK IN 

NEW ZEALAND. 

Is New Zealand to become the realized Utopia of the 
twentieth century? It looks like it. Experiments have been 
tested, which in this country would be deemed the rankest 
socialism, but have been made to work there as if they had 
always belonged to the natural order of things. To those 
unfamiliar with the practical accomplishments of the states- 
men guiding the destinies of the English-speaking people 
at the Antipodes, the progress already made will be a sur- 
prise; to all idealists and believers in the possibility of 
improving the condition of the masses, and in their capacity 
to govern themselves without the aid of the classes, it will 
be a delight. At the same time, it affords reasonable proof 
that many things we have been dismissing in the United 
States as btopian dreams are eminently practical in the 
hands of sober-minded people with honest leaders. 

The land in which these successful experiments are tak- 
ing place is a self-governing British colony, with less than 
a million population. It was fortunate in the sturdy char- 
acter of its early settlers, who shared in a large measure 
the motives, purposes, and characteristics of our own Puri- 
tan Fathers. They were Sectaries to a man. Large bodies 
of religionists left the old country for the New England of 
the southern land. The canny Scotchman with old Cove- 
nanters' ideas, clanned together in what is now the Prov- 
ince of Otago, of which the City of Dunedin, the largest and 
most thriving in New Zealand, is the capital. A thrifty and 
intelligent colony of English churchmen settled in the Prov- 
ince of Canterbury, which is the most fertile and perhaps 
the most desirable section of the country for homestead 
purposes. Then English Nonconformists betook themselves 
to the West Coast of the northern island. A colony of Ger- 
man Moravians located in the neighborhood of Taranaki. 
There were other colonies, but these were the principal ones. 
Irishmen were too busy emigrating to the United States at 
that time to pay much heed to the prospects that New Zea- 
land held out to them. Later on came the discoveries of gold, 
and in their wake a large influx of people from the four quar- 
ters of the globe. The "new iniquities," as they were called, 
soon put fresh life and energy into the country, which pros- 
pered exceedingly. In process of time religious and partisan 
differences disappeared, and as a result we have the united 
and harmonious New Zealand of to-day. Of course, a large 
volume could be written, and several have been written, 
about these events. Our purpose here, however, has been 
merely to indicate the characteristics of a people who to-day 
seem to be in a fair way to solve some of the most impor- 
tant problems known to modern sociology. 

In the first instance New Zealand made a mistake similar 
to that which hangs like a pall to-day around the neck of 
California. She permitted the bulk of the public lands to 
fall into the hands of large land-grabbers. And here the les- 
son comes in for us. She found a way that is rapidly cur- 
ing the evil. She has taken no man's land without making 
due compensation therefor, but she has broken up the big 
estates all the same. She has but exercised the power which 
our railroads so freely use: the power of eminent domain. 
And she allows the land-owner to be his own appraiser". 
She pays the value he sets upon it. But there is a "string" 
to that. If the State does not care to pay the price asked, 
she insists that he shall go on paying taxes on his own ap- 
praisement. As he has been his own assessor he cannot find 
fault with the Government if his taxes are too high. Vacant 
land alone is taxed. If the holding is large, the tax is pro- 
portionately large; if it is owned by an absentee, the tax 
is larger still, and the right to purchase any given estate 
at a ten per cent advance on the valuation given in by the 
owner for the purpose of taxation, is extended to the whole 
community. The land cannct again return into the hands 
of the few, because there can be no ownership without 
residence, nor for more than a sufficient but limited quan- 
tity. Thousands of families have moved from the cities to 
the country, under this provision of the law. Wouldn't that 
just suit California? 

The railroads, telegraphs, water works, etc., belong to 
the State in New Zealand, and are under the management 
of bureaus presided over by responsible cabinet ministers, 
who are amenable to the will of the people. As a result, 
the rates are fixed regardless of the wealth of the shipper, 



or the value and quantities of his shipments, and the farmer 
and rich manufacturer have exact equality in getting their 
wares to market. There is but a single policy and that is 
to keep on cheapening the rates as traffic increases, always 
taking care that interest and a sinking fund are honestly 
earned. Cheap excursions are run from all stations on Sat- 
urday and holidays, and are immensely popular. It is urged 
that it is better to give the people the cheap use of the roll- 
ing stock than to allow it to rust away on the sidings or 
in the power-houses. It must be pleasant to feel that one 
is riding in his own railroad carriage, like a Vanderbilt 
or a Gould. In New Zealand every man who pays taxes is 
a partner in the country's entire railroad system. 

Many more wonderful things remain to be recorded, 
for which we have not space. Labor strikes are now im- 
possible in New Zealand, all disputes being settled either 
by a court of conciliation, in the first place, or by a 
court of compulsory arbitration as a last resort. So far 
both capital and labor are said to be content with the decis- 
ions reached. That Government itself, without the inter- 
vention of a banker, advances money on lands, for the 
purposes of the improvement thereof. Not only this, but the 
Government finds a market in London for the products of 
New Zealand industry, and advances money on consignments 
in its hands and inspected. The well-known scheme of the 
late Senator Stanford by which the Government should loan 
greenbacks on the farmers' wheat at two per cent per an- 
num is an accomplished fact in New Zealand. Women vote 
and they go to the polls in about equal numbers with the 
men. Every needy individual who reaches the age of sixty- 
five is given a State pension of five dollars a week, and this 
is paid out of a graduated income tax. With such laws on 
the statute book, placed there by the free will of a free peo- 
ple, who shall say what the future of legislation in this 
country has in store for us? 



"PERSUADING" THE SUPREME COURT. 

There is a cloud gathering in the East that as yet is not 
much larger than a man's hand, but promises ere long to 
cover the entire field of politics. Trying to "persuade" the 
Supreme Court by spoken speech in open court is regular 
and all right. But all endeavors to reach it by back-stair 
routes, and by the use of Government patronage, are little 
better than so many acts of high treason. The Supreme 
Court of the United States has now before it the most 
momentous issue that it has ever been called upon to decide 
during the more than one hundred years of its existence. 
The whole policy of the administration stands or falls as 
that decision may go. The relations between the Government 
and the highest appellate court ought at all times to be 
above reproach, and at this particular juncture they should 
not even be tinged with suspicion. Justice Harlan is one of 
the Judges whom common report has for some time credited 
with being in doubt as to the issue at bar. It is a singular 
time at which to single out his son for a high federal ap- 
pointment. Yet that very thing has been done, and now 
young Mr. Harland is Attorney-General for Porto Rico. It 
is the creation of a new office which nobody claims was de- 
manded by public necessity. The position of ex-President 
Harrison on the great constitutional question now involved 
is well-known. His son Russell Harrison has been summar- 
ily dismissed from the army and is unable to find out why. 
The War Department intimates that there was no further 
need of such services as he had been rendering the depart- 
ment of the Inspector-General in Porto Rico. However, 
his post was soon taken by another, a First Lieutenant being 
jumped up over the heads of his seniors, made a Major, and 
sent to fill the vacancy. This favored appointee is the son 
of another Supreme Judge with doubts — McKenna. The two 
sons of their fathers go to Porto Rico together, and all 
Washington is commenting. But General Harrison had yet 
another indignity to suffer, in an order detailing Paymaster 
Halford to duty in the Philippines. This officer will be re- 
membered as Mr. Harrison's private secretary in the White 
House. He is a society leader of much popularity In Wash- 
ington, and this jump, not to promotion, but to the Philip- 
pines, is being savagely commented upon in the Senate lob- 
bies. Whatever else may be said about these appointments, 
they are shockingly ill-timed, and justify the suspicion of 
improper motives. 



February 9, 190). 



SAN FRANCI«CO NEWi LETTER. 



On Wedding With ol Woman 

Who is Richer than Yovirself. 



By Reginald Schuyler. 

My little screed of last week discussing the Duke of Man- 
chester has brought me more than the usual quantity of 
letters, most of which concern themselves with the old ques- 
tion. Should a man marry a woman richer than himself? 
I. who know everything and a little more, am of course ex- 
pected to answer it. My abrupt answer would be yes. Why 
shouldn't a fellow wed with a girl whose income is bigger 
than his own? Why should the course of true love or true 
comfort be interrupted by mere wealth on one side and 
equally mere unwealth on the other. My ideas on the 
marriage subject are quite frank. The woman of wealth 
can afford to marry the man of her choice without consider- 
ing the details of his fortune. On the other hand the man of 
small means with something of a social reputation to keep 
up cannot afford to marry the woman of his choice provid- 
ing her fortune be nothing at all save youth and beauty. 
This sounds harsh enough to make Cupid weep, but there are 
sense and truth in it, dear reader, that cannot be denied. 

Take the case of myself, for instance. I have an income — 
yes; but my needs, modest as they are, require every cent 
of .c. There are apartments to be kept up, a man, club bills, 
carriage bills, florist bills, tailor's, hatter's, haberdasher's, 
and bootmaker's bills — bills, bills galore. I am not so young 
a dog as to readily learn new tricks. While half a loaf may 
be that much better than none, I prefer mine whole. Now 
it in my present condition I should marry a young woman of 
equally expensive tastes, but with no income of her own, 
where would either of us get off? It would be as far as the 
creature comforts go, a fifty per cent reduction for each of 
the contracting parties. I am not advertising for a rich 
bride, indeed in all modesty I may say that I have in my day 
dodged a few of that kind entirely of my own accord. But at 
the same time matrimony falls upon the good and the bad, 
the rich and the poor alike, and who shall say when I may 
be IT? Then as a matter of kindness to her as well as my- 
self I shall see to it that her purse is adequate to at least 
an equal share of the family burden. This is only fair to 
both sides. My dear readers, poverty is the greatest thorn 
in family life. Riches may make a man bad, but poverty 
makes him worse, believe me. I am speaking, of course, 
about people of the fashionable world whose fortunes have 
been thrust upon them rather than earned. For the young 
man whose expectations lie entirely in what he can earn I 
should prescribe a wife of the same station and fortune as 
his own, a wife willing and home-loving and not given to 
social ambitions. But to those who have lived the elegant 
life and would still live it, I say don't marry unless you can 
afford it. 

In our society here in San Francisco there are no end of 
people who practically starve themselves and go without the 
proper underclothing to make the small front that will keep 
them out of the shabby genteel class. Their life is a hungry 
hollow sham; their elegance is a fake. They sip and gossip 
at fashionable teas, they now and then dine at swell dinners, 
they dance their shoes out at cotillions to which they go 
in a street car, taking chances on a cheap owl cab for the 
ride back home, they attend art shows and make calls and 
hold a pew in church — and in doing even this in such a poor 
way they beggar themselves. Mush for breakfast, and yes- 
terday's roast warmed over for dinner. And the poor maid 
of all work has hanging in the scullery a French cap, which 
she hastily dons every time the front door bell is rung. 

Heaven save me from the horrors of artificial opulence 
and position. To escape this very thing I once herded cattle 
for two long years in Arizona. I do not believe in living 
beyond one's means. I have an income that is comfortable 
enough for me; but that would be impossible for two. So 
I shall not marry unless there is some money in the match. 
Now, good people rail at me, rip me and roast me as you like, 
but such are my honest convictions. Manchester has my 
sympathy in his marriage with the daughter of Mr. Zim- 
merman. His position required the millions, and as I have 
said before a most attractive young gentlewoman went with 
them. 






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THE PACIFIC COAST REGULAR 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. 

Season Begins May 1, 1901. 

Four years' course. University graduates allowed one year advanced 
standing. All lectures between 6 p. m, and 10:30 p.m. Address, College 
Building, 818 Howard St. 

Mf-PM qq-p MADAM KLOS3, recently from New York, 

I I \J I—/ I O I L_ . has opened Dressmaking Parlors at Boom 25, 
1019 Market street, San Francisco. System used 
that took the prize at Paris Exposition. 

LATEST STYLES- PERFECT F.T< 



Bethesda 



to swim in." 



"I've prescribed 
enough . . . 

— Da. Shrady, 274 Lexington avenue. New York 

L. CAHEN & SON, Agents, Wholesale Liqu»r Dealers, 

Send for Pamphle 418_Saoramento Street, 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, San Francisco. 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LTD.) OF ABERDEEN. 



Scotch Whisky 

Importers • MACONDRAY A OO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 9, 1901. 




Tkasurelr 
Wand 



GJeo&ey 



eynowand but P/eature's^^ 

Tom /loon. 




Mrs. Fiske's production of "Tess of the' D'Urbervilles" 
has worked up a lot of talk. All good, independent plays 
do that. This is an honest drama, as clean as anything 
really broad and human can be. and its title part serves to 
reveal Mrs. Fiske at her fullest. While she is all that is 
fascinating and wicked and witty as Becky, and a figure not 
to be forgot, she is in Tess less of a specialist and more 
of an all-round woman. She reaches those inner feelings 
that only a part of deep human interest permits the player 
to reach. It is this part in this play that brands Mrs. Fiske 
as one of the greatest actresses of the generation. This 
and Becky certainly give her a position on the American 
stage that none of her countrywomen have ever attained to. 
There is no poetry in her work, no false glamour, no pris- 
matic heroines — but a certain poise and a certain unaffected 
naturalness (for naturalness like anything else may be over- 
done on the stage) that are beyond compare with anything 
in my experience of the native actress. Mrs. Fiske is a 
wonder. She has a personality that is never aggressive, hut 
that never will be denied. You hare to feel what she is per- 
sonating. Her Tess is one of the most vivid, heart-gripping 
characters in the history of the modern stage. There is no 
resisting its shudder and pathos and spell. A man sat 
near me at the opening performance whose business (or 
crime) is the lending of money at exorbitant rates of inter- 
est. He cried like a man in that scene where Tess, finding 
her written confession had gone astray, confesses in person 
the secret of the ruined girlhood to her husband. Some of the 
critics say this play is harsh, that the theatre is a pleasure 
place, that people do not go to the playhouse to have their soul 
squeezed and their nerves twisted. They object to "Tess." 
Mr. Syle for one says that the Young Girl should not be per- 
mitted to witness the performance. If writing and plays 
were maintained on a level with "The Old Homestead" and 
The Ladies' Home Journal this little world of ours would 
not be a very interesting place for grown-up folk to live in. 
The Young Girl as a censor is all bosh. We want a human 
drama with blood and spine in it. Life is not a gilded 
pill. It is sometimes uncoated, dark brown and bitter. 

But apart from all this "Tess" happens not to be an objec- 
tionable play. Its story is as simple and no newer than that 
of any common melodrama. A woman who has been seduced 
in girlhood. A man who loves and marries her, she think- 
ing that he knows all. His discovery of the real facts and 
his departure. Her attempt to support a brother, a sister 
and a drunken mother. Her sale by the mother to the origi- 
nal villain after she has been told that her husband is dead. 
The return of her husband, her resentment of the lie and 
murder of the villain. There is the outline. They used to 
qo things like that every week down at Morosco's, and 
mothers took their young along; but nobody ever objected 
on moral grounds. Mr. Hardy and his dramatist have used 
the same material with realistic, artistic effect. That is the 
only difference. They have been taken seriously, their 
just reward for conspiring to develop a serious play. 

I can see nothing in Tess to shock the old or the young 

that is to say, to shock in an impure way. I admit that it is 
a play of vital force and relentless realism; it depicts suf- 
fering; it contains very little comedy; there is a poor 
creature of a girl in it whose very soul has been soaked in 
gin; it is in no sense a "pretty" play; had Bernard Shaw 
written it and included it in his collection of "Plays. Pleasant 
and Unpleasant," it would have gone in the volume devoted 
to the "Unpleasant"— but I say it is a good honest play, and 
no one who is willing to look life straight in the eyes need 
fear to see it on the stage. Mrs. Fiske's characterization 
of the central role is something to make every art-loving 
American take hope in his race. She has reduced acting 
to nothing but the dramatic illusion; you are unconscious 
of technique, of method, of effort on her part. She is sim- 
ply the character. 

The company acts in harmony, and there are several 



instances of special success; most notably Frank Gillmour's 
Angel Clare, a clean-cut, sympathetic rendering of a part 
easily made ridiculous; Emily Stevens' unscrupulous mother, 
a bit of squalid serio-comicality of great vividness; Fran- 
cesca Lincoln's drunken dairy-maid, a pathetically real per- 
formance; and the latter half Norman Conniers' Stoke. The 
first part of Mr. Conniers' personation is mere south-of-Mar- 
ket villain work; but in the latter scenes he gives life to the 
role. In all, "Tess" is one of the big successes of several 
seasons, a performance that no sincere patron of the drama 

can afford to stay away from. 

* * * 

Even though Mrs. Henschel's voice is not all that it was 
as short a time as three years ago, the song recital by Mr. 
Georg Henschel and herself at the Metropolitan Temple 
have been a source of delight to many of our sincere music 
lovers. It strikes me that the Metropolitan Temple is hardly 
the best place for these singers, who are first of all draw- 
ing room artists, and whose spell is much stronger in a 
smaller and warmer auditorium than this one, which is cav- 
ernous and cold. It is not the voices of the Henschels that 
have made them famous figures on the concert stages of 
two continents, but their smooth, refined art, and the grace- 
ful interpretations they give to the best of vocal music. 
They would seem to work for the composer rather than for 
themselves; and many a fine old gem of song that might 
have died forgot in our busy, -novelty-seeking generation 
owes its re-popularity to the Henschels. They have the deli- 
cacy and the real spirit for song. They have none of the vio- 
lent manner of the opera star, they do not revel in obscene 
rubato and lugged in top notes. They are simple, unassum- 
ing artists, and the concert stage of to-day is the better for 
their work. Mr. Henschel, a composer and director of no 
mean rank, is not a perfervid vocalist; he hasn't much of a 
voice, in truth. But his charm lies in not insisting on that 
voice, but on the beauty of the song. The same in lesser 
degree may be said of his wife and pupil. Mr. Henschel's 
accompaniments on the piano are perhaps as perfect as the 
world has ever known. I have heard Paderewski as an ac- 
companist, and Mrs. Marx and Walter Damrosch, and a few 
others, but none whose blend was fo sure and unostenta- 
tiously artistic as Mr. Henschel's. Their programmes have 
been marked by the same excellent taste as heretofore. 
They certainly have the gift of selection and arrangement 
in its superlative. 

* * * 

The third of the Henschel recitals will be given in the Met- 
ropolitan Temple this afternoon. On Monday night, Wed- 
nesday afternoon, and Thursday night they will sing again 
at the same place. 

* * * 

Bernhardt and Coquelin too! That is a combination to 
run special excursions for. We have admired the art of the 
one and the other, but we have never seen them together, 
as they will appear on Monday night at the Grand Opera 
House, supported by the company that aided them in their 
recent successes in the East. So much has been written 
of Rostand's poetic tragedy, "L'Aiglon," that all that remains 
is to see it. Many of us are familiar with the original, and 
the English translation as played by Maude Adams — in 
book form. But this will be San Francisco's first hearing 
of "The Eaglet" in this life and from the lips of the 
greatest of actresses. It is said by the French critics that 
Rostand has developed a new phase of Bernhardt, and that 
those of us Americans who remember her principally in the 
blood and thunder of Sardou will marvel at the poetic deli- 
cacy of this personation. Coquelin as Flambeau has a 
part that does not test his strength, but still is not beneath 
his dignity. For six nights the Rostand poem will be the 
bill. A special double bill of "Phedre" and "Les Preieuses" 
will be given on Sunday night. Coquelin has his great chance 
the week following in "Cyrano." 

* * * 

Not the least of the "Gwynne" family that has been mak- 
ing so much noise in the American stage of late is the musi- 
cal version of "Nell Gwynne," as rendered by the Tivoli 
company this week. The opera, which has been here before, 
has the fac that it was not written to the popular fad in its 
favor. It is one of Planquette's earlier works, and while a 
trifle out of date in plot and score, is yet musically sound and 
full of life and merriment. Ferris Hartman has a prime 



February 9. 1901. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



comedy part, with Annie Myers as Nell. The cast Includes 
Kiiwnni Webb, T"m Green, Josepb Kosarty. Julie Cotb . 
Maud Williams. Georgie Cooper and others Aimee L 
ter makes her first appearance here in the piece, being east 
as Charles II. 

* • • 

Tlu-re was merit in the Alcazars production of Henry At 
thur Jones ".liulah." last Monnay night, for the piece In 
Itself Is eminently actable, and the stock company Bi 
to grasp the situations with considerable dramatic force. 
There is a new idol in the temple of Thespis on O'Farrell 
and his name is Joseph Kilgour, who bids fair to fill 
with grace and comfort the niche lately occupied by the 
image of one Hastings. Miss Convere let herself go a little 
more than is her doll-like wont in the piece, and there are 
thrills to burn in the dramatic climax of the second act 
The work of Juliet Crosby was up to her excellent standard, 
and Polly Stockwell deserves mention. 

• • • 

The new bill at the Orpheum should be good and of pe- 
culiar local interest. Dorothy Studebaker has finally made 
good her threat to sing in public on the stage, and Idalene 
Cotton and Nick Long are too well known here to require 
re-introduction. George Austin Moore, another new-comer, 
is a ballad singer of some note. The nine Nelsons, acrobats, 
will remain another week, and the biograph will project pic- 
tures just received from China, illustrating the recent his- 
tory war. Others among the hold-overs are Murray & Lane, 
Kathryn Osterman, Empire City Four, and Lizzie and Vinie 
Daly. 

• * * 

"Nell Gwynne" will hold the boards for another week 
at the Tivoli, and then the famous "Wizard of the Nile" 
will be given a sumptuous revival. This was one of the 
big hits of last season, and the management promises a 
repetition of the production. Alf C. Wheelan has been es- 
pecially engaged, and will appear In his original creation 
of the King of Egypt. On the evening of February 19th, 
The Eagles, San Francisco Eyrie No. 5, will occupy the thea- 
ter, the proceeds going to the fund to entertain the Grand 
Eyrie that meets here in May. 

* * • 

For the week commencing Monday, February 11th, comedy 
will again hold sway at the Alcazar, where the company is 
never seen to better advantage than when interpreting hu- 
morous roles. Augustin Daly's sparkling farce comedy in 
four acts, entitled "A Night Off," will be the offering. The 
play is not new to San Francisco theatre-goers, but here- 
tofore has been produced at prices far above the moderate 
scale adopted by the Alcazar. 

* * * 

There are but two more nights of the James-Kidder en- 
gagement at the Columbia. To-night "Richard II" and to- 
morrow night "Macbeth." The Columbia re-opens on the 
25th instant with Mrs. Carter in "Zaza." 

* * * 

The ninth annual benefit in aid of the charity fund of 
San Francisco Lodge, No. 21, Theatrical Mechanics' Asso- 
ciation, will take place at the Columbia Theatre to-morrow 
afternoon. The programme will be unusually strong. 

* * * 

Mrs. Fiske will devote the first three nights of her last 
week at the California Theatre to "Tess of the D'Urber- 
villes," and on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights, and at 
the Saturday matinee, she will repeat "Becky Sharp." "The 
Waifs of New York" will be the next attraction at the Cali- 
fornia. 

* * * 

Leopold Godowsky, the great Polish pianist, who has made 
America his home for a number of years, will play for the 
first time in this city at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s hall next 
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday afternoons, at 3.15. He 
comes direct from Berlin, where he concluded a most suc- 
cessful series of recitals January 16th, and where the critics 
award him the highest praise. His repertory is enormous, 
embracing everything of note in piano literature. His own 
arrangement of Chopin etudes are nowadays attracting wide 
attention in the musical world, also his various paraphrases. 



Mothers, be sure and use "Mrs. Wlnslow's Soothing 

Syrup" for your children while teething. 



Morosco's Grand Opera house 

Oottlob, Man * Oo and Walla Kotoeoa •" mo« Hie farewell 

nppoiirnncc in llii. city of 

Mme. saii.mi BBBNHABDT 

am. M OOQCBLD) 

I'ii.Iit Die dlraollon t.| Mu MAORI' Klimi '.t two « eekH only. 

C until, e Monday evening next. February llih.ln Rostand a 

dramatic poem, for fix nluliis and Wednesday »nd Saturday 



matinees. 



"L'AIGLON," or the Eaglet. 



Prices: 11.50, 32. SlundS-1; boxes. &0. 824 ni.dSl2; general admls- 

BJon. -J: gallery, St. 

Sunday evening. February 17th. "Phedre" and "Lch Precicuses 

BedlOUle" Mine, bernbardt and M- Cuquelin will ai pear in 

every performance. 

teats now on sale at Box Office G rand Opera Houee. 

Gli r > T\ i THE POPULAR HOUSE. 

allTOrnia I Heat re- Reservation by 'Phone. Main 1713 

Only "Tess of the D'Urbervilles" Matinee to-day. 

Beginning Monday, February 11th. last week of MRS, FISKE. 

Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, 

TESS OF THE D'URBERVILLES 

Thursday. Friday, and Saturday night and Saturday matinee, 
"Becky Sharp." 

Commencing Sunday matinee, February 17th, 
"TheJWafs of JNew York." 



Alcazar Theatre. 



Belabco & Thall, Managers. 

Phone Main 354 



Week of February 11th. 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Augustin Daly's sparkling farce comedy. 



A NIGHT OFF 



A play brim full of rollicking fun- 
Seats on sale six days in advance. 
Prices: 15c., 25c, 35c„ &0c. 
Next — "What Happened to Jones." 



T'tVoli Opera Mouse. 



Mrs. Ernestine Keeling, 

-Proprietor and Manager. 



Monday, February 11th. Second week. 
Pianquette's Lyric Gem, 

NELL GWYNNE 

Beautiful Music! 

Graceful Dances! 
Monday, February 18ih, perfect production- 
WIZARD OF THE NILE, with Alf C. Wheelan, the famous 
comedian. 

Evenings at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2 sharp. 
Popular prices— 25 and 50 cents. Telephone Bush 9. 



Of San Franoisco'a Greatest Musio Hall. 

rpnetl ITV . O'Farrell St,, between Stockton and Powell streets. 

Idalene Cotton and Nick Long. Dorothy Studebaker, George 
Austin Moore, Murray and Lane, Kathryn Osterman and Co-, 
Empire City Four, Lizzie and Vinie Daly, The Great American 
Biograph. Third and final week of 

THE NINE NELSONS, 

Reserved Seats 25c. ; balcony 10c. ; opera chairs and box seats, 50o 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

Sherman, Glay Ej Go's Hall 

Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday afternoons, 

February 12th, 13th and 15th, at 3:15. 

Three Kecitals Only- „ „ ^ Al , n .,».> 

LEOPOLD GODOWSKY 

The Great PianiBt. 

Reserved seats 52, $1.50, H. 

Ou sale at Sherman, Clay & Co-'s- 

Metropolitan Temple. 

Crowded houses award ovalions to 

THE HENSGHELS 

For their artistlo recitals- 

THIRD RECITAL TO-DAY at 3:15 p- bi. 

Next week: Monday evening, Wednesday afternoon and final 

recital Thursday night. 

Prices : 75c to $2. 

Seats on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co- 



After the Theatre 



Go where the orowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to the matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beera and supper. 

The Cafe Zlnkand is society's gathering place after the theater 

over. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



February 9, 1901. 




The Middle Five. That hoys will be boys, and that all 
boys notwithstanding differences of 
creed and color are very much alike, may be gathered from 
Francis La Flesche's story of "The Middle Five." It is a 
record of the school experiences of five Indian lads at the 
boarding school established by the Presbyterian Board of 
Foreign Missions for the instruction of the children of the 
Omahas. Situated among the wooded bluffs of the Missouri 
on the Eastern part of the Indian reservation in the State of 
Nebraska, its founding marked an epoch in the tribe. It 
is a series of sketches rather than a continued story, and all 
the boys who appear in these sketches, as well as the writer, 
made their entrance upon the stage of life in the "tee-pee" 
or in the dome-shaped earth lodge. Upon entering the Mis- 
sion School they encountered a strict rule which prohibited 
the use of their own language. English names were given 
them because their Indian names were difficult for the 
teachers to pronounce. Their lives were the same as those 
of other boys, some study and much play, hide-and-seek in 
the hay-mow, shooting with bows and arrows and banding 
into "gangs" of which "The Middle Five" was one, and to 
the which the author belonged. In writing the story of his 
school-fellows it is, he says, with the hope that these little 
Indians may be judged, as are other boys, by what they say 
and do, and their claim to a share in common human nature 
be the better understood. 

Small, Maynard & Co., Publishers. Boston. Price $1.25. 

The Story of Nineteenth Century Science. In a large vol- 
ume entitled 
"The Story of the Nineteenth Century Science," Henry Smith 
Williams, M. D., has touched upon all the important branches 
of science, explaining their most complex developments in 
a manner, which, while being thorough, is within the com- 
prehension of the layman. The century's progress in astron- 
omy, paleontology, geology, meterorology, chemistry, biology, 
anatomy and physiology, the marvels of electricity, and other 
achievements in the various fields of pure science, the author 
outlines with rare ability and extreme clarity. In the open- 
ing chapter, "Science at the Beginning of the Century," the 
writer recalls just what knowledge of the sciences men had 
in the closing days of the Eighteenth century and what were 
the chief scientific legacies of that century to its successor, 
thus enabling the reader to better appreciate the immense 
strides made in all departments. To this story of the broad 
sweep of progress during the past hundred years is added 
some most interesting sketches of the men who have made 
themselves famous by their researches, and of the manner in 
which many of these savants were led to experiment in dif- 
ferent fields of science. The large amount of biographical 
matter, the carefully compiled index, and the many portraits 
and other illustrations add materially to the value of a vol- 
ume which is a veritable cyclopedia of scientific lore. 
Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New York. Price $2.50. 

Falaise, the Town of the Conqueror. Lovers of books of 

travel will recall 
with pleasure Mrs. Anna Bowmann Dodd's charming "Three 
Normandy Inns," and will welcome with delight a new book 
from her pen. In "Falaise, the Town of the Conqueror," she 
takes the reader through the loveliest part of Normandy, 
across the plains of Caen to the cliffs of Falaise, tells of its 
street scenes and horse trading, its women vendors, and its 
Fair of Booths, the famous Eleventh Century Horse Fair, 
the greatest of its kind in Europe, and of which many a 
scene is familiarized to all the world by Rosa Bonheur's 
masterly presentment of Perechons in full action, ridden 
by peasant grooms. Part second of the book sketches the 
history of the town, the birth of William the Conqueror, his 
great fortress, his sieges, and his starting out on the con- 
quest of England. An all too brief chapter is devoted to 
the modern aspect of Falaise, a most interesting and beauti- 



ful town which is little known owing to the fact that it lies 
somewhat apart from the high-roads of tourist travel. Mrs. 
Dodd is evidently a close observer of people and places and 
reproduces them for the reader's delectation in picturesque 
fashion. Her literary style is so charming that one closes 
the book convinced that the next best thing to seeing this 
historic old Norman town for one's self is to have been priv- 
ileged to do so through Mrs. Dodd's artistic eyes. Numerous 
full-page plates and other illustrations in half-tones from 
recent French photographs add to the delights of a delight- 
ful book. 
Little, Brown & Co., Publishers, Boston. Price